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November 01, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-01

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GE TWO

"TIlE MICHIGAN IDAILY -"

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1935

1936 Supply Of
Pork Is AAA's
Latest Problem
Lending Policy Figured;
Wallace Announces 45-
Cent Corn Loan
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.-(;P)-
The AAA corn-hog section concen-
trated today on the problem of pro-
viding more pork for next year.
Secretary Wallace announced late
yesterday a 45-cent corn load for
the 1935 crop. This removed the
lending policy from among the major
worries for the present, and prepara-
tions were made for a gathering of
farmers coming here Monday to work
on the new corn-hog control con-
tracts for 1936.
Producers from the principal corn-
hog states will meet for a week's ses-
sion to tell the AAA what they think
the contracts should provide. The
AAA already has made known the
aim will be to increase hog produc-
tion.
Upon the farmers' suggestions,
AAA Administrator Chester C. Da-
vis said the new corn-hog program
will be drafted. Current in some
quarters was talk that the farmers
may be asked for their view on the
'"ever-normal granary" plan legal-
ized by the AAA amendments. This
would call for storage of crops on
farms in good years so they can be
utilized in poor years.
Secretary Wallace, long an advo-
cate of the plan, called attention to
a new requirement for qualification
for a corn loan this year. He said
that cribs in which "loan corn" is
stored must be capable of storing the
corn safely for two years. This re-
quirement, he added "might be or
might not be" the beginning of the
ever-normal granary.
The corn loans will be made avail-
able after Dec. 1 on field corn husked
and stored in the ear in sealed cribs.
Loans will be made on corn grading
only No. 3 or better, whereas in 1933
and 1934, a No. 4 grade was suffi-
cient.
Davis said that not more than
$150,000,000 would be required to
finance the loans this year.
Length Of Hair On
Canine Is Temper
Index, Says Doctor
CHICAGO, Oct. 31.-- (P)- The
length of Fido's hair is a good index
to his temper, Dr. Morris Fishbein,
editor of the Journal of the American
!Medical Association, said today in
an article on control of rabies.
"It is well known that . . . long
haired dogs develop rabies less fre-
quently than short haired dogs be
cause of the greater opportunity for
the removal of infectious saliva by
the coat of the former," the editor
wrote.
"Female dogs are gentler with chil-
dren than are males," he said.
Dog owners should be cognizant
of these facts in order to proctect
themselves from bites, which are "not
as uncommon . . . as might be be-
l believed," Dr. Fishbein wrote.
"Despite the availability of anti-
rabic vaccines, the number of deaths
from human rabies has remained vir-
tually unaltered for the past 25
years," his article said.
Because the Pasteur treatment
"does not invariably protect the pa-
tient," Dr. Fishbein said, "The local
procedure is the minimizing of canine
rabies and its spread by biting dogs."
With actual immunizationof dogs
still in the experimental stage, he
urged:

"Through elimination of all stray
and unlicensed dogs."
Leashing or muzzling of all licensed
dogs, which "should not be permitted
to roam freely on public grounds."
Placing of full "responsibility of
dog bites and the burden of all ac-
cruing expenses . . . squarely on the
owners of the dogs."
ACCIDENT VICTIM DIES
Mrs. Louise M. Letts, 80, 1012 Mich-
igan Ave., victim of an automobile ac-
cident in which one man lost his life
and his daughter and two others
were injured Monday, died yesterday
in the Plymouth hospital.
Her daughter, Mrs. Minnie Dietz,
55, who has seen two husbands die as
a result of traffic accidents, is im-
proving rapidly, according to physi-
cians. She has a possible skull frac-
ture and cerebral concussions.
Mrs. Letts died from a cerebral
concussion.
SHERIFF GETS NEW CARS
Four new automobiles were pur-
chased recently by the sheriff's office
and will be delivered today.
Three of the cars are coaches and
one is a large sedan, "for the bigger
jobs," as Sheriff Andres said with a
smile.

Stage Strike For Longer Football Practice

-Associated Press Photo.
Students at Gloucester, N. J., high school, demanding shorter school
hours so the football team will have more time for practice, went on
strike. Ruth Verfaille (left) and Peggy Lengel were two of the pickets
arguing that school should close at 2:30 in the afternoon.
Even In Gay Nineties There
Were Bright Spots In The Dai

Castle Offers
'Control' For
State Matters-
'Automatic Sanctions' Are
Cited As Best Influence
On Beligerents
(Continued from Page 1)
scored the flat declaration of the
present administration that we will
never recognize Manchukuo.
"If China recognizes Manchukuo
we would have no excuse not to fol-
low suit," he said.
As a general peace-insurance pro-
gram for the United States the
speaker urged that we "use the pres-
ent situation as a lever to bring about
a new understanding of neutral
rights."
After the present crisis passes, he
said, this country should work for
international rules that will protect
neutrals, rather than belligerents "as
they always have in the past."
He asserted that the foreign policy
of a nation should be the concern of
its state department, and that the
president should only interfere as a
last resort.
Presidential interference has been
employed much too often in the last
few years, he went on, and has had
"unfortunate results."
"The New Dealers would probably
call me reactionary," he said, declar-
ing his belief in "pure democracy,"
rather than in any of the European
dictatorships.
"Even in Washington," he con-
0 tinued, "there is today a strong ten-
, dency to centralization of authority."
y "I have no quarrel with the New
s Deal's recognition of Russia," he de-
clared. "The only thing I didn't like
e was the reason given - an increase
d in trade," which wasn't, he said,
, "playing the game with the American
e people."
n -___rn_
Sidney Ranson To
e Talk On Theosophy
k
s Capt. Sidney Ranson, noted Brit-
e ish theosophist, will deliver two ad-
s dresses here today in Natural Science
d Auditorium under the auspices of
e the Ann Arbor Theosophical Society
e and the Student Theosophical Club.
- The first lecture, "The Great Or-
derly Plan," will be given at 4:15
e p.m., and the second, "Theosophy,
f the Science of Life," at 8 p.m.
t Praising Captain Ranson as "one
e of the outstanding men anywhere
d in the field," Dr. Buenaventura Jim-
t inez of the Medical School, president
e of the society, said that the public is
f invited. There is no admission
's charge.
W Captain Ranson, who served in the
Royal Air Forces during the World
War, has been associated with the
r International Theosophical Society
- for many years, Dr. Jiminez pointed
r out. He has been an engineer in
- South Africa, a Liberal member of
- the British parliament, and an ed-
itor.
The theosophist came to the United
d States only recently, as a guest lec-
n turer of the Theosophical Society
of America.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
Yclock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance lic per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephonemrate -- 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions.
101' discount if paid within ten days
Minimum three lines per insertion.
from the date olast insertion.
By contract, per line- 2 lines daily, one
month ..... ..........8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 monthsr........c
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ..........8c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used as desired ..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired .........'lc
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The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per Inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Se per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6e per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7%, point
type.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A small 4x6 notebook. Name,
Edward James, Chem. 43A. Re-
ward. 92
LOST: Gold penknife and chain near
Dental School. Finder please call
6430.
OXFORD GREY SUIT COAT in
Union recreation room, Saturday
afternoon. Call Roldel, 6738. 90
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Suite with private bath
and shower for three or four.
Sunny rooms, steam heat, phone
8544. 422 East Washington.
88

Classified Directory

I

MAJ ESTIC
LAST TIMES TODAY
DOUBLE FEATURE
WALTER C. KELLY
ill
"VIRGINIA JUDGE"
-- --- Also
in
"HOT TIP"
-- EXTRA -
FEDERAL HOUSING REEL
METRO NEWS

I

ii

First Edition Boasted Four
Column Paper Full Of
Local News Items
By DON T. SMITH
From the file room of the Publica-
tion Building comes a musty old
volume which contains bound copies
of The Michigan Daily for 1891. A
careful perusal of the book not only
offers a sharp contrast to The Daily
of today, but also shows how rapidly
our University has expanded and de-
veloped.
The Daily of the gay nineties was
a four page newspaper of four col-
umns whose content was over half
advertising. No Associated Press
stories, Washington correspondents,
or photographs adorned its pages. It
contained only local news, an edi-
torial or two, and the official bulletin.
Asked For Support
Its editorials during the first year
of its existance were dominantly pleas
for better support by the student
body. One editorial stated: "It (The
Daily) is no longer an experiment,
but has come to stay. It has re-
ceived very encouraging support from
the business men and tradesmen of
Ann Arbor, and only fair support
from the students."
The second issue came out with an
editorial stating that two important
positions were still open, and went on
to say "these positions will be filled
according to the rule of the present
Flood Causes
Farm Damage
In New Jersey
Authorities Claim No Lives
Were Lost; River Rises
Above July's Top Mark
NORWICH, N. Y., Oct. 31.-t)-
Flood waters caused by two days of
rain rushed through Norwich and
Oxford today, but the sun came out
and the water began to recede.
Farms, highways and railroad
tracks were inundated, and village
streets damaged, but no loss of life
was reported. Some streets were
cluttered with rocks and clogged with
silt. Water entered homes and bus'
iness buildings.
Police said the Chenango river rose
several feet higher than during the
disastrous July flood which swept
southern New York, causing more
than 40 deaths. Most of the dam-
age apparently was caused by smaller
streams, however, and observers said
it would not compare with damage
caused by the July flood.
One highwayubridgedwas washed
out, others were closed, and a train
was halted by water on the Dela-
Ware, Lackawanna & Western rail-
road.
Early reports indicated that today's
flood was localized in the Chenango
River valley. The Chenango runs
into the Susquehanna at Bingham-
ton.
IUMMM

board, ,by competition." After two
weeks of competition, not overly keen
the jobs were filled, and The Daily
continued its publication of campu
news.
One full issue was devoted to th
new stadium and athletic field use
then. The story omitted no details
mentioning "it is located on Stat
Street about six minutes walk from
the intersection of Packard and Stat
Streets. It is entirely enclosed by a]
eight-foot fence, the entrance gat
being at the middle of the side bord
ering on State Street. A board wal
along the east side of the street lead
to the entrance." Judging from th
article, interest in the project wa
slight for "no one seems to have ha
the responsibility of overlooking th
work, and, as a consequence, th
workmen have been permitted to pro
ceed as slowly as they liked."
In this embryonic stage of Th
Daily, each issue usually consisted o
one detailed, length story on the fron
page, editorials, want ads, and larg
advertisements on the second, an
campus news on the third and las
pages. Under the headline "Th
Campus" there followed items o
every nature, from Professor Scott'
illness to the installation of a nev
bulletin board in Newberry Hall.
News Hard To Get
Getting news to fill the newspape
then was quite a problem. The pion
eer editors of The Daily filled thei
"Campus" column with such para
graphs as the printing of new post
cards of the campus, two fraternitie
having sittings at the photographer's
new officers of the Prohibition an
Democratic Clubs, and a discussion
"King Lear" by the Shakespear
seminary classes.
Wh-en The Daily finally gainedo
firm foothold as part of the Uni
versity, students sought it as a mean
of expressing their opinions and de
sires for improvements. These let
ters were published under the head
ing "Communications," and althoug
at first they appeared only sporadi
cally, the letters soon became a regu
lar feature.
Treated Varied Topics
Their subjects were varied. On
letter pleaded for better lighting con
ditions in the library saying, "whe
the gas burners give their best ligh
comparatively few persons are fur
nished with a light strong enoug
and steady enough' for a safe use o
the eyes."" Another student in hi
letter argued that credit should b1
given by the faculty to students wh
devote their time and effort to Th
Daily.
There was no sports page in th
University paper then, although ar
ticles on sports were included often
Society news was excluded for year
untilsthe size of the paper was in
creased.
Advertisements filled up one of th
four columns on the front page, an
traveling minstrel shows, livery com
panies, and stores selling oil for oi
lamps all helped finance The Dail
in those trying years.

OLANDER GETS NEW TITLE
LANSING, Oct. 31. - (iP)-Gov.
Fitzgerald appointed Oscar G. Olan-
der today as commissioner of state
police under the terms of the so-
called state police Kcivil service law.
The 1935 legislature enacted the
law which provides that the com-
missioner can be removed only by
preferring charges against him be-
fore the state supreme court.

MAC'S TAXI -4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x
Dr. Heller Given
Commission Post
Dr. Bernard Heller, leader of the
Michigan Hillel Foundation, has been
invited to serve at the Central Con-
ference of the American Rabbis on
the Commission of the Revaluation of
Judaism, it was announced yester-
day.
"The purpose of this commission,"
explained Dr. Heller, "is to draw up
a platform expressing the present
viewpoint of reformed Judaism in
America." Many of the foremost
spiritual leaders of the country com-
prise this commission and its work
will be vitally important for a clearer
understanding of the present prob-
lem confronting Jews, Dr. Heller said.
APPLES VEGETABLES
SWEET CIDER
Open Evenings and Sundays
FARM MARKET
320 East Liberty Phone 9778

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TAKE CARE OF
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while you are thinking about it

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