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October 29, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHI XN IAILY-

A -.4

4
4

Dr. Blakeman
Speaks From
Morris Hall
Address Is Third Panel In
Paren-ducation Radio
Broadcast Series
"Why Don't Michigan Communi-
ties Do A Better Job of Preventing
Juvenile Delinquency" was the sub-
ject of the third panel of the parent-
education series, which was broad-
cast over WJR at 1:30 p.m. today.
The discussions were led by Dr.
Edward W. Blakeman, counselor in
religious education, L. H. Lamb, sup-
erintendent of schools at Flint; and
W, P. Rutledge, Wyandotte chief of
olice.
In summarizing the discussion, Dr.
Blakeman stressed four suggestions
which he believed necessary to di-
minish juvenile delinquency in Mich-
igan first, the requirement that every
activity of the city, whether social,
economic or political should be con-
scious of their obligations to pro-
duce good citizens; second, the
simplification of religious establish-
ments. "The churches should be lo-
"cated strategically to serve youth
ward by ward," he said, "and also
control of the churches should be
shifted to men trained in religious
education rather than in leadership
for adults.
The third requirement, he stated, is
the establishment of community
councils which will persist in efforts
to meet all social needs, efforts to
provide religious training, and the
fourth was the legislation should be
sought which will survey the chil-
dren's health regularly, locate emo-
tional instability early and challenge
the family, the church and the school
to re-educate every maladjusted or
problem child.
The next in the series of discus-
sions on juvenile delinquency will be
given at 1:30 p.m. next Sunday, when
J. M. Rowlander, probation supervis-
or of the state welfare department,
will speak on "What is the Most Im-
mediately Practical Thing That Can
'Be Done to Improve Juvenile Proba-
tion and Parole in Michigan?"
Professors Leave
For jental Chio
Leaving for New Orleans this week
are Prof. Bulkley Vedder, Prof. Paul
H. Jessrich and Oliver C. Applegate
of the School of Dentistry.
They will attend the annual con-
vention of the American Dental As-
sociation to be held the week of Nov.
4. Professor Vedder is planning to
present a paper before the conven-
tion.
Prof. Richard H. Kingery and Prof.
George R.,Moore are attending con-
ventions of allied societies of the
Dental Association this week. They
will remain in New Orleans to attend
the principle meeting.
Aryan Kiss Jails
Jewish Mereant
HEILDESHEIM, Germany, Oct. 27.
- 03) - A kiss from one of his pretty
Aryan salesgirls cost a Jewish mer-
chant a month in jail today.
Another salesgirl chanced upon the
embrace, and tattled. The court
ruled the Jew had "insulted not only
a German maiden but also the entire
German people" although the girl
said she had offered no resistance.
The prosecutor asked for a three

NOTICE!
BRING THIS AD and
to IVORY'S
Corner Hill and State Sts.
and get a Large Root Beer
and a Toasted American
Cheese Sandwich.
A 20c Lunch for One Dime!

Jimmy W onders While New York Waits

--Associated Press Photo.
Jimmy Walker, former Mayor of New York, is gazing pensively at
the city which once idolized him. He is reported to be wondering, as he
returns to the metropolis from Europe, what kind of reception he will
get after his three-year absence.
Vi naud Collection Is Nucleus
For New Library Department

Outline Budget
For onmnty
Fund Agencies
$50,000 Is Alloted By The
Community For Relief
Organizations
Budgets totaling $55,000 were an-
nounced yesterday for the affiliated
agencies of the Ann Arbor Com-
munity Fund.
Budgets for the various agencies
were determined by the budget com-
mittee of the fund associatin work-
ing on the basis of the quality and
the quantity of the service rendered
to the community by these agencies.
The budget of the Salvation Army
has been increased from $4,731, which
was allotted for 1935, to $5,500 for
1936; while the Young Men's Chris-
tian Association budget has been in-
creased from $6,352.50 to $6,500.
These increases are based on the fact
that since the withdrawal of Fed-
eral assistance in the problem of
taking care of transients, the in-
creased burden has been taken care
of by the Salvation Army and the
Y.M.C.A.
The largest cut for the coming year
has been in the campaign expense
budget which has been reduced from
$4,040, the amount spent last year,
to $1,200 which is to be allotted for
1936.
Ex ec Large
Ateudance At
Press Meetng
A record attendance of approxi-
mately 200 editors and publishers is
expected at the 17th annual meeting
of the University Press Club of Mich-
igan which will meet here Nov. 14, 15,
and 16, committee members stated
yesterday.
The unusually large number of ap-
plications for room reservations be-
ing received by Prof. John L. Brumm,
chairman of the journalism depart-
ment and permanent secretary of the
club, led officials to anticipate the
large attendance. Reservations have
been coming in faster than at any
time in recent years, Professor
Brumm said.
The journalism department has
asked all Ann Arbor householders who
have roomhs available to notify them
by postal card.
Plans for the meeting and the list
of speakers will not be completed un-
til later this week. Senator Arthur
H. Vandenburg has been secured to
give the feature address, and several
members of the University faculty
will speak.
In the first nine months of 1935,
figures show 5,639 truck loads of
fruit and vegetables were shipped
from Sacramento, Calif., to out of
state markets.

IIr

WANTED FOR SALE
STENOGRAPHER: Half-time work, TANDEM bicycle in good condition
afternoons. Must be rapid and ac- for only $20. 617 Ashley. 83
curate on engineering dicetation --
and interested in a position for THREE formals, size 16 for sale,

:,
i
_ n

BETTER COURSE
BALLRIOM
DANCING
4 Reasons Why:

ified Directory

two years or longer. 85
HOUSEHOLDERS near the campus
having rooms to rent on the nights
of Nov. 14 and 15 for attendants
at a newspapermen's convention,
notify by postal card the Depart-
ment of Journalism, 213 Haven
Hall, Campus. State price. 87
NOTICES
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: FRIDAY night, October 25.
Vicinity of Hill and Tappan, a
female Manx (tailless) kitten. Buff
colored. Call Richard Johnson,
7376 or return to 731 Tappan. Re-
ward. 86
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x

peacock blue, black and gold. Al-
most new. Reasonable. Call 2-1750.

3i

1 80
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. 1.00. Many style.
Craft Press. 305 ird. 9.- -
VOICE BUILDING and singing. Fri-
vate and class lessons for juniors
and advance students. Grace John-
son Konold, 1908 Austin. Phone
4855. Formerly voice instructor in
School of Music. 5x
MAC'S TAXI--4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x

I I

1. Strictly Private
2. Teaches the latest dances
3. Lessons at your convenience
4. No onlookers; no embarass-
ment.
Terrace Garden Studio
Wlumriii 'lwater Bldg Phone 9695

MILLEf
727 North University
Phone 9797
Sells

°. ,

11

Baltimore
Dairy Lurch
Opposite Angell Hall
Special Plate Lunch
For Today
ROAST REEF
or
BALTIMORE MEAT LOAF
with Creamed Potatoes,
Creamed Corn, Bread and
Butter.
15c

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
FOR RENT
SOMEONE wanted to live during
winter in summer home on Whit-
more Lake. Completely furnished
and all modern. Rent reasonable.
Phone during the day. 4323. 84
PARTY WITH BUICK car wants
driver to Florida. Phone 3591. 76
Head flattening was a common
practice of the Waxhaw Indians of
South Carolina. Infants' headsnwere
slowly compressed, giving them an
elongated forehead and bulging eyes
which supposedly made them better
hunters.

The annual average value of all
agricultural "rops and livestock in
Kansas for the last 20 years was
$438,241,102, according to official es-
timates.

1
*
T<
Y,
to
k
f-
.
l

The Vignaud collection - one, of
the largest on geography and explor-
ation ever collected by one man -
has formed the basis of the Clements
Library map division which is in its
first year as a separate department.j
The maps included in the VignaudI
collection form the nucleus and the
major portion of the map division.1
Henry Vignaud was an insatiable
book collector, scholar, and noted au-
thor on historical subjects, accord-
ing to library authorities. His main
interest concerned the history of
geographical discovery; his library
was filled with all the books, atlases,
maps, manuscripts, and pamphlets
he could buy on the subject. As H.
G. Brown, head of the map division
of the Clements Library, has ex-
plained, "EHe was never known to be
wealthy, and probably he did what
il book - lovers do in Pais,
'haunted the left bank of the Seine,'
and all the small obscure book shops
looking for bargains during the many
years he lived in Paris as secretary to
the American legation and embassy."
Columbus and Vespucius were the
subjects of Vignaud's most important
writings. His own copies, specially
bound in red morocco, are part of
the collection in the Clements Li-
brary.
On his death at the age of 92,
Vignaud's library was offered for
sale and it was his wish that the
collection which filled three large
rooms to capacity should go to an
American university. The late Re-
gent and library donor, William L.
Clements, heard of the possible sale
of Vignaud's books so he persuaded
his fellow regents to send a Univer-
month sentence, but the court cut.
this to one month because the Jew
had fought in the World War and
because the girl accepted the kiss too
wilingly.
Drink ROYAL DAIRY Milk
for your health. We have a
complete line of dairy goods.
Ryal Dalry
421 Miller Ave. Dial 3836

sity representative to Paris to obtain
the collection. In this Regent Clem-
ents was partially influenced by the
fact that he was about to present
his own Library of Rare Americana
to the University, according to Dr.
R. G. Adams, Clements librarian.
"The Vignaud Library," Mr. Clem-
ents is quoted as saying, "dove-tails
into my library in a remarkable fa-
shion. It supplies the critical and
reference books which explain the
source books in the Clements Li-
brary."
William W. Bishop, University li-
brarian, was sent to purchase the
library and in evaluating it he said,
"The library is worth the entire
sum asked . . . the collection supple-
ments our present holdings in a very
remarkable way. Its purchase will
save ten or fifteen years of work in
making the Clements Library pro-
ductive in scholarly publications."
The material in the Vignaud col-
lection was distributed between the
General Library and the Clements
Library according to content, officials
said. Everything relating to the dis-
covery and development of America
or the Americana section being
placed in the Clements Library.
There it was deemed necessary to
provide a special department for the
care of the maps which made up a
large part of the collection, accord-
ing to Dr. Adams.

WI

ki

________________ __ ___ ~ ==~-

Schaeberle Music House
203 East Liberty Phone 6011
CLASSIC and POPULAR MUSIC
Strings and Repairs for all Musical Instruments
Expert Repair Work

II

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents THE HONORABLE
WILLIAM RoCASTLE
FORMER ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE
AND AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN
speaking on
" ur Relations W t
other Nations"
THU RSDAY, October 31 - 8:15 p. m.
at HILL AUDITORIUM

0

Season Tickets: $3.50, $3.00, $2.75
Single Admissions: 75c and 50c 1

Tickets at Hill Aud.
10 to 12 and 2 to 4 Daily

I,- *- - - - - - - --- -___________-_______________________________________ ________________________________________

r.

LAST TIMES TODAY
"THE IRISH IN US"
and
"THE GIRL FRIEND"
Wednesday - Thursday
SYLVIA SIDNEY
"ACCENT ON YOUTH"
and RICHARD BARTHELMESS
"FOUR HOURS TO KILL"

I

SLaugh Laden

15c MATINEES
and Balcony .Nights

_

Matinee 2°& 3 :30' t Matinee and
Evening Shows at L ** Baic. Evenings 25c
7 & P.M JVI ~ Jj ~ Vain Floor Eves., 35c
LS wSHh MA ESTIC-
LTSHOWING OF

:;1

DAILY 1:30-11 P.M.
Wl lTN EY
15c to 6 - 25c After 6
Now

I

I
I

TWO FIRST-RUN
FEATURES !

PETER B. KYNE'S
'Ca ppy Ricks
Returns'
and
Jean Arthur Geo. Murphy
~s

114

U t:-:: - L.'&. 3 '_ nwA"C. e 1t 4 '- ':'U - II, I

" I I &A ^^ ?®

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