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September 24, 1935 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEPT- EPAM R 4, 1535

THE M CHi Cx A "D A I°L

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TIlE MICHIGAN DATIN

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American College Girl

Shows

Independence Of Parisian Designers

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Chooses Dress
For Comfort,
Practicability
Combines Sweater Of One
Costume With Skirt Of
Another For Economy
The traditionally true American
girl will once again assert her in-
dividuality when she sets her own
styles for campus wear this year.
She is independent of the Parisian
designer choosing the more comfort-
able and attractive as well as ec-
onomical models instead.
It is her privilege to take a sweat-
er belonging to one outfit and com-
bine it with a skirt of another suit
thus making two suits go a long way.
In so doing the modern college wom-
an's wardrobe is more economical
than in the past years. It is not
unusual to see a sorority woman
down on her hands and knees
stretching out a sweater that she has
just laundered.
The newest skirts are circular in
form- ranging in color from the
calmest grey to the most outlandish
plaids which can only be subdued by
a plain blouse or sweater. The odd
jacket completes any outfit.
The swagger suit of shepherd's
plaid will be headlined as the most
popular costume for the class room.
The coat is sufficiently long to serve
on chilly days with plain sport
dresses. It is ideal for the early foot-
ball ;games as well as "tea" dates
especially when eombined. with a
smart "Highland fling" hat, purse,
'gloves and shoes to match.
For the days when a heavy coat
is necessary, it is convenient to have
at least one knitted dress or a tail-
red frock. One dress can appear
miraculously different with a change
of collars and cuffs.. These assessor-
ies will be in the limelight as the
most important part of any ward-
robe. In the selection of clothes, one
predominant color scheme makes it
possible to have a complete outfit at
any time.
An additional fact in favor of the
knitted frocks is during the after
dinner hour in any sorority, dormi-
tory, or league house when the time
is spent in knitting over the inevi-
table idle gossip. Soft woolens in the
glow crinkle yarns as well as boucle
for the dressier ocacsions are es-
pecially popular. Large wooden but-
tons in modernistic shapes complete
the dress effectively.
One of the most attractive dresses
fir the class room comes'in the new
camel-suede material reminding one

Cardigans Popular

Formals For This Year Show

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Cardigans are popular with 'the
student for campus wear. These in
gay colors over plain skirts are ap-
propriate for the class room.
of last year's uncut velvet. This
model is ideal in that it doesn't
wrinkle easily or get shiny, and is
also inexpensive enough for anyone
to squeeze it in the skimpiest allow-
ance. It comes in tailored models.
Suede shoes will again reign for
fall campus wear. Brown oxfords
combined with a green kid trim were
noticed in one shop. The low heeled
shoe is not only the most oppropriate,
but also the most comfortable for
school with the auto ban continuing
to operate.
The fall hats are the most flatter-
ing to the average face that they have
been in years. The "jockey" hats with
the brim hiding the one eye ranks
along with the saucy "bell-boy" fash-
ions in popularity especially when
made up in autumn colors. The pert
feather trim makes any hat look
jaunty.
SHOW SOFTER TONES
The exotic nailpolishes shown dur-
ing the summer months are being re-
placed by the softer fall tones, rose
and gold. Although a flare of color
is striking with an evening gown, it
is too conspicuous to be in good taste
for daytime on campus. Natural
and shell are more appropriate.
Although short hair' cuts with a
natural hairline in back and soft
curls on the sid is most in favor thiss
year, as always any coiffuer that is
becoming is acceptable.

The new formals which will be
seen at all the smart campus social
functions this year are more color-
ful and romantic than they have
been for years, with styles ranging
all the way from exotic Medici in-
fluences to copies of Hindu women's
costumes.
Or, if these two extremes don't
suit your taste, choose something in
between, - a sophisticated formal
with intricate Grecian drapery, or a
military-looking formal, perhaps in-
spired by the threatening Ethiopian
war, trimmed with jaunty braid.
The richest colors of the artist's
palette have been chosen for this
season's formals, and when the deep
shades of mulberry, purple, andl green,
are made up in velvets and crepes,
they are almost breath-taking. The
fabrics are varied, too, with an old
favorite of the Gay Nineties, change-
able silk, back in a prominent posi-
tion in the fashion news.
Florentine Influence Present
Metallic materials are again pop-
ular, although designers are using
lame and gold-threaded crepes and
taffetas with even more originality
than last year. The Florentine in-
fluence is found in the popularity of
jeweled clips and belts copied after
the intricate gold jewelry of the per-
iod, and some of the beautiful ham-
mered gold pins, set with rubies and
emeralds, seem worthy of Lucrezia
Borgia.
One of the most striking formals
we saw on display among the new
collections was made of flame chiffon,
simply draped, and copied so exactly
after the ancient Grecian costumes
that it might have stepped right
from the Parthenon frieze. Bands of
gold encircled the full skirt and
crossed over the shoulders in front
to form the narrow belt.
Taffeta, Striking
Another unusual dress that would;
be perfect for the campus social
events was a dark changeable taf-
feta that changed from black to]
red or blue under the lights. It was
cleverly made and boasted a fitted1
jacket that made it as practical as1
it was good-looking.c
Though lace and tulle have tradi-
tionally been considered too sum-,
mery for wear during the winter, thei
designers are paying no attention to
old traditions and are showing many
would have caused lifted eyebrows
lovely dresses in light materials which
and scornful protests several years
ago.
An outstanding example of thisc
type of formal was one of tulle, shad-i

ing from pale pink at the top down
to deep rose at the hem of the bouf-
fant skirt. Yt was simply made, de-
pending upon its cut and color for
its smartness, but the result was ul-
tra-ultra good-looking.
Black Velvet Popular
On the opposite end of the fabric
scale from tulle lies black velvet, and
this fabric is being used in many of
the new dresses. Our favorite was
one which combined the velvet with.
black lace. The lace was used for
the bodice and tied in a tiny bow, and
and had short cap sleeves, a dress
guaranteed to look as smart after a
hard winter's wear as when you put
it on for the first rushing formal,
Drapery seems to be an obsession
with fashion designers this fall, and
it is not surprising that there is an
amazing number of draped formals
being shown in local shops. Some of
the dresses have folds of the material'
looped at the side, while other have
the drapery at the hipline in the new
front fullness. One dress we saw
caught our fancy, because it fitted
tightly in front and then flared out
jauntily in back. Its material was
pink moire, and it had a demure
square collar and cap sleeves.
Perfect For Brunette
Dark green is stunning in a formal,
and even more so when it is used in a
metallic striped taffeta, as it was in
one dress we saw. It was made
simply with a fitted skirt and .nar-
row straps, and would be perfect on
a tall, sophisticated brunette.
No article on fall fashions would
be complete without mentioning vel-
veteen, which has become one of the
foremost fabrics in fashion headlines.
We saw one in a luscious shade of
purple, with a little-girl effect of a
button-on bodice. However, it had
a very grown-up back, fastening at
the neck, and then widening out.
We always thought jersey was such
a nice practical material for school
wear but we certainly were laboring
under delusions. The first thing we
knew they were showing jersey for
evening wear. It's a little dressed up,
though, because it's shown with me-
tallic threads. We especially liked
one formal we saw in black metallic
jersey with smart under-arm shirring.
What more could you ask for, that
is, if you want to be popular, and
who doesn't?
FAVORITE COLORS
Favorite colors for fall are rust,
green and brown, these three colors
often being encluded in the same
dress. As usual, black is still a pop-
ular color.

Newest Shoes
Combine Style
And Comfort
Oxfords Are Shown With
Low Heels And Variety
Of 'Leathers And Shades
Even if you have never walked
much before, you will while in college.
The long treks from one building
to another at the opposite end of
campus between classes will soon im-
press upon your mind the need for
comfortable shoes.
Comfort and style is combined in
many of the models shown in local
stores. Those extremely sporting ox-
fords shown to go with your camel's
hair coat or swagger suit have low
leather heels and are made in all
varieties of leather. Some of the
latest styles have fringed flaps at-
tached to the tongues. They are made
in buckskin and in almost any color
you might want, brown, black, grey
and even navy blue and green.
Combinations of colors are shown
in other models. One style uses navy
blue and chamois color, another
brown and rust and still another
brown and green. A -dress sandal
in suede combines brown, wine red
and tan and is stitched in the pattern
of leaves.
Gabardine is being shown in dress
shoes. Either as a contrast to a dark
dress or as a continuation of the color
scheme of your outfit, fabric shoes
are being made in shades of wine and
green. Incidentally, hose are also
being made in these shades.
For very dressy shoes which are not
quite formal sandals, satin or velvet
umps are quite the latest thing.

Formal Headdress
Shows Ornaments
To add that regal touch to your
new formal wear an ornament in
your hair. They come in all styles
and designs to go with every shape
face and hair style.
An unsual coronet is made of gold
to grace the head of the fair blond
with a headdress ,.of curls. A very
interesting silver clip inset with
rhinestones is worn just above the
ear holding back a roll of curls.
For the headdress featuring a curl
at the side of the forehead ,a special
ornament has been designed follow-
ing the curve of the curl.
Another type is the ornament
which encircles the back of the head
just above the nape of the neck. It is
made of silver and is brightly stud-
ded with jewels. Still another varia-
tion is the use of flowers in the hair.
Gardinia or daisies are wore in a

row at the back of the head or single-
ly at one side.
If one prefers to wear earing , the
clip style in plain gold or silver hoops
or jeweled are still popular.
i\
4l
CWARNERETTE)
Twor- way s/ rc ch
It's sole mission in life is to
smooth young hips-and with-
out any "bound in" feeling.
Made of soft knitted Lastex -
has bumpless "Pantom grip"
garters in front.
It's grand for any sort of wear
sports, lolling around, or
partying.
Have you ever tried an "Alure"
bras? They're KEEN!
8 Nickels Arcade

IT'S WORTH A TRIP
DOWNTOWN

If It's a
Smart Hat
You want and
not too expensive,
we have it!
OHat Shop
117 East Liberty
Across from The Pretzel Bell

COLOR CONTRASTS

The latest trend in fashions is to
emphasize color contrast. Acessories
no longer are chosen to match but
to acecnt the dress and two colors'
are often used in the same model.

II

University of Michigan Oratorical Assn.

NV

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I'

Special College Opening
Prices in our Beauty Parlor

OUR FAMOUS.
"Camli a "
PERMANENT
WAVE
A lovely wave at a low price
given by thoroughly experi-
enced operators, in a Style
becoming to you.
Regular x3.50 Value.
5.0
. ."."$3.50
. . . . x4.50
. . . . $5.50

ti w---

w . - ____ _..w

Welcome I
--to the new "Michigan"
co-eds and upper classmen
THESE FAMOUS MAKES
OF FROCKS AWAIT YOU
exclusively at
BRADLEY
* ELLEN KAYE
LOUISE MULLIGAN
EISENBERG
McCallum and Mojud Hosiery
These famous makes, always presenting
distinctive style together with the fact that
hundreds of dresses await your choosing,
makes The Collins Shoppe your favorite
shopping place for correct campus attire.
We Invite You To Inspect Our Showing.

-,"

Hill Auditorium

1935-1936

Ann

Arbor

II

EIGHT OUTSTANDING FEATURES:

EMIL LUDWIG
Noted Biographer
Author of "Napoleon,"
"Bismarck" and other
Books
HON.
WILLIAM R. CASTLE
Distinguished American
Diplomat
WON.
HARRY L. HOPKINS
Head of The Works
Progress Administration
REV.
BERNARD R. HUBBARD,
S. J.
"The "Glacier Priest"

REAR ADMIRAL
RICHARD E. BYRD
Famous Aviator'Explorer
DOROTHY THOMPSON
Outstanding Woman
Journalist
JOSEF ISREALS
Brilliant Commentator
On Ethiopia
EDWARD PRICE BELL
Foreign Newspaper
Correspondent

4

Charleen Wave
NtioEugene ... ..

Shampoo and Finger Wave . . . 50c
Oil-Shampoo and Finger Wave . 75c
Haircut . .50c Manicure . 35c

Rear-Adiiral
RICHARD E. BYRD

SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES
Three Central Sections of the Main Floor . . ...........................$3.50

Arch'

.. . 35c

Facials . $1.00 up

Extreme Right and Left Sections of the Main Floor........
Three Central Sections of the First Balcony ................ .

.. $3.00
. .. . . .$3.00

Extreme Right and Left Sections of the First Balcony.................$2.75
ALL SEATS RESERVED

Call 4161 for Appointment

Single Admissions: Main Floor, 75c, 50c, except
will be: Main Floor,$1.00;

for the Byrd lecture when the prices
Balconies, 75c.

X XTT T TR*. rr 7 v : - .- ,.. -

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