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October 15, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCTOBER 15, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY

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Varsity Holds
Light Drill To
Polish Attack
Oosterbaan Characterizes
Wisconsin As Potentially
Dangerous
Frosh Learn Plays
Reserves Hold Lengthy
Scrimmage In Which
Stabovitz Stars
With several outstanding excep-
tions, Coach Harry Kipke allowed the
Varsity men who beat Indiana, 7-0.
Saturday, to take an easy day yester-
day when he devoted most of his time
to discussing their errors and smooth-
ing out several new plays to use
against Wisconsin next week.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan, who
spent Saturday afternoon, scouting
Wisconsin in their tilt with Notre
Dame, characterized the Badgers as
"a big, heavy team which would be
very dangerous if it got started."
Wisconsin's lack of speed, however,
has been particularly apparent in all
three games, but given a lead to de-
fend, the Badgers could make it very
tough for the opposition, Oosterbaan
thought.
Oosterbaan Teaches Badger Plays
With the Wisconsin plays which he
had diagrammed, in his hand during
the entire practice session, Ooster-
baan spent some time teaching a
freshman team the Badger forma-
tions so that they can demonstrate
them to the Varsity in dummy scrim-
make this afternoon.
The remainder of the Varsity squad
which did not see action Saturday,
along with Mike Savage, Earl Meyers,
and Jim Lincoln, took part in a
lengthy scrimmage' on Ferry Field.
Everybody was allowed to get in the
game before the afternoon was over,
but without a doubt Chet Stabovitz
stood out as the best individual per-
former of the afternoon. A hard-
running, heads-up ball player, Stabo-
vitz turned in a stellar performance
yesterday when he side-stepped, stiff-
armed, and pivoted away from tack-
lers time and again as he reeled off
consistent gains. Stabovitz is a driv-
ing runner who picks his hole and re-
fuses to stop because a tackler has a
hand on him. His blocking ability
was also aptly demonstrated yester-
day when he cut down three would-
b tacklers to clear a touchdown path
for one of his teammates.
The injury jinx which has been
pursuing the Wolverines relentlessly
since the beginning of practice, seems
still to be very much in evidence. Bob
Amrine seriously injured his leg in
scrimmage last night. Bill Renner
appeared on the field with a very ten-
der left finger and a sore throat. X-
rays showed no fracture to be pres-
ent in the hand, however, as had been
feared earlier, but big Bud Hanshue
will be out of uniform for several
weeks with the twisted knee which
forced him out of the Indiana game.
Everhardus To Leave Hospital
Chris Everhardus was due to be re-
leased from the University Hospital
last night. He has been confined
there with a slight concussion, and
in all probability will be in shape
for Wisconsin. The men who are
definitely out of the picture as far
as the Badgers are concerned are Bob
Cooper, who today went back to the
hospital with the leg injury which
has handicapped him all season. Bob
Amrine who also has a bad leg and
Fred Ziem whose trouble is the same.
Joe Rinaldi was on the field today,
but it is very doubtful if he will be

in shape to see a great deal of service
in Madison. He has been out of uni-
form so long that, he is pretty well
behind the rest of the squad and Tiny
Wright will probably start at center.

McMillin, Philosophic In Defeat
Compares Football Game To Life

By LESTER BRAUSER
"When your squad's green, and
comparatively untried, you can hard-
ly blame it for shortcomings such as
it revealed in the game today."
Thus, the slight, gray haired Bo
MlcMillin philosophically and char-
acteristically excused his big Hoosier
eleven for its defeat by the Wolver-
ines last Saturday. In the dressing
room after the game, he was a strik-
ing contrast to the coach of a losing
team who growls and grumbles over
his team's faults. He talked freely
and unhesitatingly with newspaper-
men, answering every query affably.
"Only three seniors in my lineup,"
the Indiana Mentor commented. "In
fact, there are only seven seniors on
the entire squad and there were 13
sophomores out of the 35 I brought
along today," he added.
"My boys made plenty of mistakes
today but they will play again and
then they will not repeat their er-
rors. That is how they'll find life
after they have discarded their grid-
iron togs for the last time -plenty
of lessons they'll learn then from
their mistakes. The first mistake
means little if it teaches a person
Al Agett Averaged Over
14 Yards On Each Play
EAST LANSING, Oct. 14.-(/)-
Al Agett, the Tennessee reserve back
who stole the offensive honors for
Michigan State at left halfback in
Saturday's game, advanced the ball
119 yards in eight plays, the statisti-
cians' records showed today. The
average is 14.9 yards on each play.
He was not thrown for a loss once.
On one play he was trapped behind
the line on an attempted pass, but
turned what should have been a loss
into an eight-yard gain by squirming
through a half dozen Kansas line-
men.
Kurt Warmbein, the regular left
half, and Steve Sebo, reserve right
half, had poor blocking in front of
them most of the day and were
thrown for heavy losses. On 12 plays
from scrimmage Warmbein gained 37
yards but lost 35 on those in which
the Kansas linemen threw him be-
hind the line. Sebo carried the ball
13 times, gained 55 yards and lost 29.
All prospective freshmen wrest-
lers are asked to report to Coach
Kelly at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the
wrestling room of Waterman
Gymnasium.

his lesson but if it is repeated it's
just too bad," McMillin continued.
That is Bo McMillin. He takes his
football seriously realizing its main
practicability.
"Kipke's boys, like mine, lack the
necessary experience to land on top
of the Big Ten football heap this year.
I believe," he added.
Coach McMillin was not lacking in
praise for the men of the Maize and
Blue. He thought that Michigan de-
served a heap of credit for its un-
expectly fine showing Saturday.
Captain Reed Kelso spoke of Mich-
igan as a nice well balanced all
around team,- and another of his
teamates, C. W. Norton, added than
he knew as well as the rest of the
Indiana team that their considera-
tion of Michigan as an outfit to be
reckoned with, and not just a "set-
up," was well founded, as the score
after the game indicated.
So Coach Bo McMillin, one of the
world's finest gifts to the coaching
profession, left Ann Arbor after tast-
ing his first licking at the hands of
the Michigan Wolverines. He'll
probably taste it again just as well
as he will make Kipke's men feel the
bitterness of defeat but the bitterness
will melt away before the power of
his fine, clean personality.
I-M Sp orts
VOLLEYBALL

Swim Jude,' 3I~ltMannu~
Matt Mann, Varsity swimming
coach, will offer two series of
swimming classes for male mem-
bers of the faculty beginning Mon-
day, October 14 at the Intramural
pool.
A beginners' class will meet
Tuesday and Thursday from 12:15
to 12:45 p m., and a section open
to any faculty member will meet
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
at the same time.
K arpii ski Winis
72 Hole Medal
PlayTourney
Al Karpinski of Rochester, N. Y.
won the 72-hole medal play Univer-
sity golf championship when he card-
ed a total of 313 strokes to nose out
Al Saunders and Chuck Novak who
tied for second place with 317 blows
each. Bruce Smith was fourth with
322.
Karpinski, a sophomore, is a rangy,
well built stylist who will undoubted-
ly play Varsity golf this year. Saun-
ders is a junior who has already had
a year of Varsity experience while
Smith and Novak are comparatively
inexperienced.
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, coach,
announced at the same time that
he made public the results of the
University tourney, that the fresh-
man squad for the coming week
would consist of Emery, Novak, Blak-
ley, Smith, Evans, Murphy, Zimmer-
man, and Griffin.

A BRAIN HARASSED BY A PEN
THAT RUNS DRY, LOSES ITS
Haki
Hence Parker Created 102% More Ink Capacity and Visible Ink Supply

All
ed in
their

independent students interest-
playing volley ball should send
entries in to the Intramural

* From Harvard to Southern Calfornia
Wan ted by More Students That's why thousands of students are ton pump like other sacless pe
replacingtheirpresentpenswiththisrev- nothing to render it useless later
Than All Other Standard olutionary new Parker Vacumatic with That's why it is guaranteed meet
7rw m le visible ink supply and 102%more of it. cally perfect. Go to any good

Sports building immediately.
in the Independent Volley
league starts Oct. 24.
SPEEDBALL

Play
Ball

L I CLl Cl:! l. V(dZVi IGGl.4

Doherty.
Call

Again Issues
For Frosh Talent

Fraternity teams will try to apply
rushing methods to speedball as the
regular schedule is resumed at 5:15
p.m. today. Games scheduled for
today are: Theta Xi vs. Psi Upsilon,
Phi Beta Delta vs. Sigma Phi Ep-
silon, and Chi Psi vs. Sigma Alpha
Mu.
TOUCH FOOTBALL
Students wishing to play touch
football should send their entries in
to the Intramural building at once.
Touch football is becoming more pop-
ular every year among students who
like to play football but are unable
to play on the varsity squad. Fifteen
teams have already entered the In-
dependent Touch Football League
and play will start Oct. 21.
Suede and
Wool Jackets

Coach Ken Doherty has issued a
second call for freshman candidates
for cross country, javelin, shot put
and discus. All who have participat-
ed in high school or prep school in
any track activity are requested to
report to Coach Doherty any after-
noon this week at the Yost Field
House or at Ferry Field.
All Students interested in try-
ing out for the Varsity Wrestling
team should meet at 8 p.m. tonight
at the Michigan Union. The exact
room will be designated on the
bulletin board.
Cliff Keen, Varsity Wrestling
Coach.

Every time that you
write, your Train of
Thought flashes along
rails more delicate than
gossamer. And every
petty annoyance-e very
distraction-caused by a
pen that skips and runs
dry in study periods,
classes, or exams, ob-
structs the track and de-
rails the train.

WRITES TWO WAYS
WITHOUT ADJUSTMENT

By holdi"g this mir-
acle writer to the light,
they can see the ink level
-see days ahead if it's
running low. It is lami-
nated-built tip ring
upon ring of shimmering
Pearl and Jet--smart,
velvet-like, wholly ex-
clusive.
It contains no rubber
sac found in sac-type
pens-no scquir t-gun pis-

CALKINS-FLETCHER DRUG STORES

THREE

DEPENDABLE STORES

324 South State

818 South State

A $3.50 Hat.
thiat looks
ike $6-ina
Mirror!.
If you can tell one of these
%3.50 La Salle hats from the
%6 article, there's a job waiting
For you in the highest hat
:ircles.

CLOTHING OF VALUE AND DISTINCTION SINCE 1848
Two Ways to Outsmart the Weather

1'

III

So we keep bringing in these
$3.50 hats for $6.00 heads,...
md keep worrying about
yours.
Walk A Few Steps
And Save Dollars
Tom Corbett
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
116 East Liberty Street

.HRI
KNOWN AS THE BEST - THE BEST KNOWN
with MANHATTANIZED
Collar Attached.
F RE IS THE NEW Manhattan
shirt with the "Manhattanized"
collar attached, the soft collar that
looks stiff, that stays put, that gives
you that well-groomed appearance
mny time of the day. It will not wilt
-)r wrinkle. There is no starch used.
It keeps its place properly on your
deck. A product of Manhattan skill
znd Manhattan devotion to quality
standards. Available in a smart new
iclection of fancy patterns as well
is white and plain colors.
Retails at $1.95
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
WeSene toSeve Aydin'
809 SOUTH MAIN STRLCT

SUEDES . . . $5.95 to $10.95
WOOL .....$4.95 to $6.45
Several Styles to choose from.
CLOTHES
119 South Main Street

L

..I'

Two Important Events at Calkizis-Fletcher s
DO COME IN Special Exhibit of
and have a quiet PERSONAL TALK with C A R L ZEISS
MISS MARJORIE MURPHY DRc'vRI E
(EXPERT BEAUTY CONSULTANT)
Let her tell you about
Under the Direction of MR. SM E RAG E
I vrbara Qould Special Representative of CARL ZEISS, Inc.
Will Be Held in Our Store
NEW IRRADIATED SKIN CREAMB! O
$2.75 Wednesday, Oct. 16
(TRIAL SIZE $1.25)
Featured in This Exhibit
Barbara Gould's representative will be here
ALL THIS WEEK 9 ZEISS-IKON CAMERAS * BINOCULARS
to explain to you Barbara Gould's new Skin Cream which is *' MAGNIFYING GLASSES - and a display of
irradiated, with vitalizing, health-giving ultra violet rays! Exceptional ENLARGEMENTS made with
It stimulates the tissues to make tired, sluggish skin look
smooth and young and unlined. Come in and let her look a Contax Camera.

TWEED
BALMACCANS
Durable, warm, handsome tweed coats
in either a plain or reversible coat. Two
shades of brown, three of gray and a
rich gray-blue.
$22.50 - $27.50 $30.00

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