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October 11, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AY, OCTOBER 11, 1925

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 19~I5

Number Of Jobs University Broadcasting Studios
For Graduates Get New Recording Apparatus

Shows Increase
Statistics Of Engineering
College Show Trend To
Larger Companies
(Continued from Page 1)
jects have been the chief sources of
work for graduating students in the
civil engineering department. Prac-
tically all of these students have ob-
tained employment, according to
Prof. Lewis M. Gram, head of the
department.
The largest single employer of civil
engineering students has been the
Michigan State Highway Department,
which is in the process of building up
a, large organization for the utiliza-
tion of work relief funds granted
under the PWA and WPA units of
the Federal government. Prof. J.
H. Cissel of the department is now
on leave from the College, and is
superintending the bridge construc-
tion projects of the highway depart-
ment. A number of the students are
working with him on construction
jobs throughout the state.
Professor Gram reports an actual
scarcity in civil engineering students
available for employment who have
had experience. He finds that the
WPA and PWA have only started to
absorb the number of engineers
which their full programs require, and
that positions on these projects will
continue to be opening up for a long,
time to come. On the other hand,,
employment in private work is rela-
tively small, only a few of the stu-
dents having secured jobs in non-,
governmental civil engineering fields.
In the department of chemical and

By ARNOLD S. DANIELS
A set of complicated, dangerous-
looking instruments wa's installed
yesterday in the broadcasting room
of Morris Hall amidst great rejoic-'
ing by the speech department of the
University. The equipment, known
as the "Presto Recording Apparatus,"
has long been one of the greatest
needs of the speech department in its
research into diction and the correct-
ness of speech faults. Until this time,
a dictaphone has been used for theI
purpose, and because of the fact
that very few individual recordings
can be made, the results have been
of little value.
The new equipment will be used
by the 300 students taking speech 31
and 32, "where," says Professor Gail
E. Densmore, "it isalmost necessary
for effective teaching of all phases
of speech."
By means of the recording'appara-
tus it will now be possible to present
metallurgical engineering approxi-
mately 80% of the senior graduating
students from last year, and all of the
advanced and Ph.D. students have
found employment, according to the
records of the department. Although
no definite statistics are available,
this is a decided improvement over
the employment figures of this time
a year ago.
A majority of these employed stu-
dents are working in the larger com-
panies, and the jobs include a wide
variety of chemical engineering pro-
cesses. More students are working
in the petroleum field than in any of
the other processes, while less popular
concerns include activities in the al-
kali, gas and coke, rubber, organic
chemicals, iron and steel industries.

to students the "before and after"
of speech defect treatment; it will
also be used as a control stimulus in
testing audience response. A unique
feature of the recorder is that it is
able to record, and play back what it
is recording simultaneously. In this
manner the student will be able to
have a permanent record made of his
voice while the instructor is study-
ing it. The ease and rapidity with
which the equipment can be handled
will also make it possible to take al-
most twice as many individual rec-
ordings as was formerly possible by
using the dictaphone and other less
developed methods.
The records used are special "Pres-

ute, and may be played back at the the foreign languagesand alumni
same speeds. departments, i the case of the first
The apparatus itself is made up of for aiding students in their pronun-
three separate cases, one containing ciation. and in the case of the second
the recorder itself, another contain- for
ing volume and quality control and sending to alumni too far away
the third containing the delicate ma- to visit the University recordings of
chinery which controls the speed and talks of faculty members, as well as
transmission of the whole, recordings by such University organ-
The equipment will also be used by izations as the band and glee club.
C;A MPUS BEAUTY SHOP
SHAMPOO and FINGER WAVE
MONDAY and TUESDAY 35c - Regular Price 50c
71 1 North University Open Evenings Ph. 2-1379
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r

i
t

ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES FOR STUDENTS
Pianos to Rent Repairing of All Musical Instruments
Scluaeberle Music House

..,.°
..........
KAIN

to" records, which utilize a thick
layer of wax on an aluminum base,
making for much greater durability
than the standard record. In size the
records vary from twice the size of
the largest commercial records to
those about the same size as com-
mercial recordings of nursery rhymes
and children's sons.
The speed of the recordings can
be varied from 77 revolutions per
minute to 331/2 revolutions per min-
BEAUTY SHOPPE
625 East Liberty, over Kroger's
Shampoo, Finger Wave 50c
Manicure 35c Arch 35c
Open Evenings by Appointment
Telephone 5861

New Location: 203 East Liberty St.
40 Years in Ann Arbor
-I - - - -

Phone 6011
- - - - - - - -

r

It's Worth A

Trip Downtown

-

. , r-,-c' c' D

DR S\ Coo
D qRddCct

!/

11

NEW SUITS
$2950

EVERY WEEK.
to $3500

E have the smart little

Hats you

s
see in

"Vogue"

and "Vanity Fair.,"

Prices start at $2.98

State Street on the Campus

FOGERTY HAT SHOP

117 E. Liberty St.

Across from

Pretzel Bell

11

(I

II

J

PA

RESTRICTED ATTENDANCE

) FINE ORCHESTRAS
of M. and U. of Indiana featuring "The Harmony Sextet"

THREE BALLROOMS .....

. NEW AMPLIFIERS
open Free Ping Pong

Taproom

Friday: BARBARA STRAND~"Y Body and Soul" -- "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes"
Sam Stoller and Bob Clarlin Soloists "The Four Men of Note" Collins and Ganzhorn--Tango

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