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February 28, 1935 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-02-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THu

THE MICHIGAN XDAILY
PubiLs .ed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
19~34 P tiaeviJyezt1935 v
P L" s~eWISCONSIN

"university-country club." The fact that a very
large portion of the student body is working its way
unquestionably establishes that many, at least, are
interested enough in getting an education to make
all the sacrifices involved in earning their own
way.
In regard to Michigan in particular, the fact
that 53 per cent of the entire student body is at
least partially self-supporting shows that Mich-
igan is no "Harvard of the West" in this respect.
A University of Wisconsin political science pro-
fessor has been appointed a special advisor to
Emperor Selassie of Ethiopia. Mussolini should
hastento counteract this by creating another cab-
inet post for himself.
A former professor of fencing at the University
of Minnesota is trying to revive interest in his art
in New Orleans. A match between Huey and the
leader of the Square Dealers should draw a good
g ate.
TheSOAPBOX

'
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J

MAMMON

COL LEGIlATE
OBSERVER

I

By BUD BERNARI)

S

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered atrthe Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mal.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Ollices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street.
.Arm Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214,
psentati ves: National:Advertising Service, Inc. 11
We, 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.

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7

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ................WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR...............JOHN HEALEY
ETITORIAL DIRECTOR ...........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ..................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ......................EI^ANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. Evans, John J. 1laherty,
Tlhomas E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Mac-
donald, John M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
FMorence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown, Clinton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
G. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard Weissman, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
mond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
Dorothy Briscoe, Florence Davies, Helen Diefendorf,
Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin,
Elizabeth Miller, Melba Merrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Rueger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ................RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER ...............:...ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department. Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park.
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS : Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kollig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernadine
Field, Detty Bowman, Judy Tresper, Marjorie Langen-
derfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN M. O'CONNELL
it' Still Up
To The Students. . .

Letters published in this column should not be,
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Revolutionary Right
To the Editor:
Required reading for William Randolph ($80,-
000,000-a-year) Hearst and his cohorts:
"This Country, with its institutions, Belongs
to the People who inhabit it. Whenever they shall
grow weary of the existing government, they can
exercise their constitutional right of amending it,
or Their Revolutionary Right to Dismember or
Overthrow it."
This scanjdalously subversive doctrine - this
Bolshevistic political tenet - this fragment of
criminal syndicalism- was advanced by -
America's Abraham Lincoln.
-U.S. Radical.
'Back TO Fundamentals'
To the Editor:
The Communist scare in the universities with its
attendant investigations and proposed investiga-
tions is reminiscent of a similar scare a few years
ago in certain orthodox churches. For years the
missionary societies had been sending their cast-
off barrels and puny pennies to their paid repre-
sentatives among the heathen across the seas. Dis-
tance lent charm to the activities of these emis-
saries until some snooping traveller discovered that
instead of teaching denominationalism ornament-
ed with the blood of the crucified Christ, these un-
grateful and harebrained apostles were neglecting
the fundamentals of baptismal ritual and many of
the churchly constitutionalities.
Immediately the ignorant populace among the
missionary-supporting laity, was aroused with the
cry of "Investigate! Clean up our mission fields!
Recall the unorthodox! Back to fundamentals! The
heathen are being imposed upon! Let us protect
the heathen!"
At a great expense and much unnecessary
trouble, properly endorsed men were sent around
the world to find out what the missionaries were
doing. That no one was recalled following the
investigation proved to the disgruntled and be-
wildered citizenry of the church that their under-
paid apostles were doing .their best under cir-
cumstances which no one except teachers and hea-
then can possibly understand.
If our "boys and girls" may be likened to the
"heathen" of the foreign, mythical islands and
"inland jungles, may we not wish for them but one
thing-not that they may be given the "right"
ideas but that they be awakened to think for them-,
selves?
-Free Thinker. l

It was pretty late last Satjrday night, or
perhaps I should say early Sunday morning,
when a group of ralher nuoc:t Aows Con-
gregated in front of the D.U. Us -se a Corne
Univerity They raised such a racket tht
everyone in the house was se m ros~d n
pretty sore about it too. Finay one of the
fr aters went to quite the argument. No sooner
had he stepped out of the door t!n ne of t e
crowd yelled at him:
"Hey, you, ish ft's the D.U. tose"
The brother replied that it was.
"Well do you know Jack Srnith?"
"Yes, he's my roommate. What about it?"
"Well, will you pleash come here and pick
him out? The rest of ush want to go home."
This story originating from the campus of the
University of Colorado runs as follows:
Chi Psi fraternity was awarded $30 damages
by a student jumy of law school students. The de-
fendants were three members of Chi Omega soror-
iy-
The Chi Psi charged the co-eds c dt6,.own a tree
f hei'front .xrd to wn a et of a li.e numbcr
of cokes. Thy jury fNund the co-eds gulty of
malicious, wanton, and reckless disrcgard of prop-
erty rights," and fined them the $30.
The Chi Psi had sued for $70.
Down at the University of Oklahoma the
other day, a load arrogant freshman crowded
into the front line of the registrar's office and
blustered out. "I wanna enroll."
"You can't enroll here," he was told.
"Then where can I go?' he demanded.
The 25 fellows whom he had butted in on
then told him.
ADD EXAM QUESTION BONERS - In a his-
tory class at Illinois the professor asked his class
to define A.U.C. (which means translated from the
Roman, "from the founding of the city") and he
got from one prodigy:
A stands for apple that man loves in a pie.
U stands for unicorn and by a lion did die
C stands for care -- from the apple 'twas left.
0 stands for the grade the question will get.
A fraternity at Ohio State University was
complaining about the water in the house main,
which they claimed was unsafe for drinking.
The other day one of the members was asked.
what precaution they take. He answered, "first
we filter it."
"Then, what?" the other asked.
"Then we boil it and add chemicals."
"Yes."
"And then, we drink beer."

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:e

A Washington
BYSTANDER

ANALYSES of the ills of the present
and past student government to
cause its attempted revision each year is not en-
tirely due to imperfections in the form of govern-
ment employed. Regardless of how much "power"
is given the council, if its members and the stu-
dents at large are not sufficiently interested to
make it an important body, it will not be one.
The trouble with a great many critics of student
government, including those who deprecatingly
remark that there is no such thing as real student
government, is that they expect the Board of Re-
gents and University officials to give them powers
and functions which have been exercised by the
University before the council has proved that it
is competent to handle them.
There have been several changes of student
councils during the past few years. Each time a
new constitution has been adopted there have
been pleas for more power until there is in the
proposed constitution an almost blanket provision
of power for the new body.
The whole idea in drafting this constitution
was to increase the power and the democratic
bacliground of this body, but on paper it appears
not very distinct from other plans which have been
submitted. The reason, basically, is that no coun-
cil is better than its membership, and its mem-
bership is no more active than the students want
it to be.
The present council undoubtedly did not go out
looking for things to do, but it acted capably with-
in its own sphere. If the new council or any new
council is to be a success, the students must know
what they want accomplished and then must in-
sist upon action by the council on these matters..

As Others See it
Let's All Have Tea
IT IS UNFORTUNATE that Harvard and Ox-
ford are having difficulties finding a debating
subject other than the two already suggested. One
of these is trivial; the other non-debatable before
an American or British audience. Neither question
commands great public interest. The subject: "Re-
solved: That This House Favors a Government
Censorship of News.", is not debatable for either
Americans or Englishmen. The First Amendment
to our Constitution provides: "Congress shall make
no law . . . abridging the freedom. . . of the press."
Popular opinion in both nations is overwhelmingly
in favor of the negative on the censorship resolu-
tion. It is significant that this is the side of theJ
question each team wishes to uphold.
To break the impasse caused by the worthless-
ness of this question, Oxford has proposed the
resolution: "That the First Function of a Biog-
rapher is to Reveal Feet of Clay." Is this bit of
dilettantism the best topic two liberal universities
can find to discuss before an international audi-
ence? Are Harvard and Oxford so secluded from
the so steeped in the academic cloister, that they
can find no more fundamental problem to argue?
Such a trivality may serve for a literary tea, but
so important an event as the Harvard-Oxford
debate merits a more vital subject. Harvard and
Oxford hold a significant position in both Amer-
ica and Great Britain. Their common spirit of
friendly inquiry and intelligent criticism should
find play in such a contest. '
The Harvard Debiting Council has refused to
discuss over a transatlantic network a subject
suitable only for a minor English A theme. Since
both teams desire the same side of the censorship
question, it remains to suggest a better theme. "Re-
solved: That the United States and Great Britain

Li
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27
AS AN EXAMPLE of things political being far
from what they seem, the Senate vote on the
McCarran amendment demanding that the gov-
ernment pay wages prevailing locally for work
relief projects, is illuminating.
Attempting an analysis of
the strangely mixed motives
behind individual votes which
made up that 44-to-43 admin-
istration defeat is like trying___
to unscramble eggs. In that r
fact lies the chief hope of ad-
ministration leaders that in
the end the White House will p
have its way about the details
of the program. The weakness
of the position of the McCar-
ranites, most of whom are ar-
dently in favor of an even more . ENRIK SMIPSTEAR
gigantic work relief program,
is that they won that tilt by grace of the votes of
an indefinite number of senators whose object was
to kill, not to nourish, the resolution.
THERE is no other way of accounting for the
strange spectacle of apparent Republican
unanimity for the McCarran amendment. For the
first time in years the East-West party split failed
to show itself. A dozen Repub-
lican liberals and almost as
many die-hard regulars voted
together. Even those twin one-

Gcio.oxle

ummalm

a
O'D
AY

Subscripti s For the
Remainder- School Year

0

No Rich Man's
School ...

F REQUENT INSINUATIONS to the
F affect that the University of Mich-
igan is, or is becoming, a rich man's school are
pretty effectively refuted by statistics recently
released from the office of the Registrar which
show that nearly 53 per cent of the student body
earn either all or part of their way through college.
Eliminating women students, the percentage of
men alone who are wholly or partially self-sup-
porting is even more significant. The statistics
reveal that slightly more than 61 per cent of the
men fall under this classification. Nearly 30 per
cent of the campus women are working at least
part of their way.
The figures of the Registrar's office also disclose

man minorities who sit with
the Republicans, LaFollette of
Wisconsin, Progressive, and
Shipstead of Minnesota.
Farmer-Labor, went along,
" ': That would look like a Re- !
publican get-together at last
on an issue. It was nothing of
the kind. It had no more sub-
stance as indicating party har-
ROBERT MfI.FOLLETT mony than has the much
vaunted figure of 13,500,000
Republican votes cast in the last election, which
ignores the particular brands of Republicanism for
which much of that vote was cast.
THE FACT that 15 of the 32 senators whose terms
expire in '37 voted for the McCarran amend-
ment, 10 Republicans and five Democrats, suggests
that personal political considerations and organ-
ized labor influence played an important part in
the outcome. No doubt they did in individual cases.
Yet, the broad basis for Republican conserva-

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