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June 01, 1935 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-06-01

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PAGE :SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUIWAY, JUNE 1, 1935

°AGE°SIX1TAL A M 1T1 1AN DAIL

Faculty Men
Discuss Result
Of NRA Ruling
E x p r e s s Confidence In
Continued Upswing Of
BusinessQ Recovery
(Continued from Page 1)
of the anti-trust measures will depend
largely on the executive. "The Pres-
ident sponso'ed the law encouraging
industry to codify and suspend the
anti-trust laws," he said, "Now how
can he in good grace crack down and
demand that they apply as'strictly as
before?"
Although he believed that "work-
ers who had jobs were immediately
assured of standards under the codes, "
he pointed to the fact that "the work-
ers' welfare depends on his total an-
nual income, not on his hourly wage.
If the NRA has cut down this annual
income, it is better it is gone."
He concluded the interview by say-
ing that he does not see how it is
possible to duplicate the code system
through a new NRA enacted by Con-
gress.
Professor Peterson minimized the
importance of the NRA, declaring that
"in the recovery plans it never has
had importance commensurate with
the ballyhoo given it and enormous,
amount of organization and admin-
istration activity involved in the code
formulation and enforcement."
"Therefore," he averred, "the NBA's
collapse possesses less significance
than present publicity might indicate.
There is nothing in the abolition of
the codes that would retard the bus-
iness upturn except the possibilility
of labor troubles that may occur.
"Also," he emphasized, "if the coun-
try irrationally adopts the belief that
a calamity has befallen it in the
collapse of the codes, that in itself,
though not justified, would hinder
recovery."
Commenting on the political con-
sequences of the NRA decision after-
math, Dr. Dorr expressed a belief that
"Congress will not do anything about
it this session."
"While the court's verdict of un-
constitutionality will give the Re-
publicans and anti-Roosevelt men a
chance to point to the NRA as a
failure in the 1936 campaign," he
predicted, "it will at the same time
give President Roosevelt an excellent
alibi. If recovery is not sufficiently
advanced by the time of election, the
President can say it is the fault of
the court's decision."
Dr. Dorr saw a possible line of ac-
tion in "returning to the Federal
Trade Commission and stronger anti-
trust laws." He advised that the
commission be given supervisory
power and that business be allowed to
organize its own codes.
The NRA ruling does not jeopardize
the AAA, he exclaimed. "That depends
on the Federal government's spending
power. Neither can I see how it can
have an effect on the government's
spending program," Dr. Dorr declared,
and "I think the TVA is also consti-
tutional."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Physics and Philosophy
Relativity and Uncertainty
The Theory of Emergence
Science and Religion
Professor Preston W. Slosson, Tues.
Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat., at 10:30.
Europe in Ferment:
The Aftermath of Versailles
Europe in Bankruptcy
Dictatorships and Democracies

Russia-The A w a k e n i n g
Giant
Storm Clouds on the Rhine
Prof. John B. Waite, Mon., Tues.,
Thurs., Fri., at 1:30.
Law Enforcement Today:
What Criminal Law Seeks to
Accomplish
Insanity and Trial by Jury
Police Problems and Behavior
The Modern Public's Respon-
sibility

Professor Harlow O. Whittemore,F
Tues., Thurs., Sat., at 9.t
The Modern City:
The Modern Capital
The Modern Metropolis
The Modern Industrial Town
In addition arrangement has beent
made for special lessons in tennis at
eight o'clock inithe morning on thej
women's athletic field and golf at
4:45 in the afternoon on the Uni-
versity Golf Course, by Coach Ray
Courtright of the University Staff.
These lessons are free to all enrolled
in the Alumni University.
For further information address
Bureau of Alumni Relations, 205 Uni-
versity Hall, Wilfred B. Shaw.
Plans for Baccalaureate and Com-
mencement.: All who expect to takec
part in the exercises of Commence-
ment week will please take note of
the following schedule in order that
there will be as little confusion asI
possible in carrying out the program:
Punctuality is especially important
as the processions will start on sche-
duled time.
Baccalaureate - Sunday, June 16,
11:00 a.m.
Weather Fair
Time of Assembly-10:45 a.m.
Places of Assembly
Members of the Faculties in Angell
Hall, Room 1223. Rhetoric Library
where they may robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, and Deans in
Angell Hall, Room 1011, the Regents
Room.
Students of the various schools and
colleges, as follows:
Literature, Science and the Arts on
Main Diagonal walk between Library
and Engineering Buildings.
Education on walk North side of
Physiology and Pharmacology Build-
ing.
Engineering on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Court.
Architecture on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Arch. (behind
Engineers).
Medical on diagonal walk between
Chemistry Building and Library.
Nurses on diagonal walk between
Chemistry Building and Library (be-,
hind Medics).
Law on East and West walk, West
of the intersection in front of Library
(behind Law).
Dental Surgery on North and South
walk in rear of North wing of Uni-
versity Hall.
Buisness Administration on walk in,
front of Physiology and Pharmacol-
ogy Building.
Forestry and Conservation on walk,
in front of Physiology and Pharma-
cology Building (behind Bus. Ad).
Music on diagonal walk from Li-
brary to Alumni Memorial Hall, near
Library.
Graduate on East and West walk
West of Library entrance.
Honor Guard at Waterman Gym-
nasium.
Weather Rainy
A sprinkle will not be considered
rainy. It must actually rain with no
prospect of clearing.
Students will proceed directly to
Hill Auditorium. Seats will be re-
served until 10:50 a.m.
Faculty will assemble in the dress-
ing rooms, second and third floors of
Hill Auditorium, where they may robe.
Enter by rear doors.
Commencenent - Monday, June
17, 9:00 a.m.
Weather Fair
Time of Assembly -7:45 a.m.
Places of Assembly:
Members of the Faculties and in-
vited guests, in Angell Hall, Room
1223 Rhetoric Library.
Regents, Ex-Regents, Deans and
Candidates for Honorary Degrees, in
Angell Hall, Room 1011, the Regents
Room.
Students, and Honor Guard at the
same places as for Baccalaureate.
Line of March -State Street to

Ferry Field.
Weather Rainy
The sounding of the University
Power House Siren at 7:45 will indi-
cate that the exercises have been
transferred to Yost Field House.
Students will proceed directly to
the Field House and enter through the
North doors.
Members of the Faculties will en-
ter through the North doors and take
their places on the platform in the
Field House.
Regents, Ex-Regents, Deans and
Candidates for Honorary Degrees will

assemble in the office in the North
end of the Field House.
L. M. Gram,
Chief Marshal
Students who receive the Bachelor
of Arts Degree in June or August, and
who are considering an additional
year of graduate study in prepara-
tion for work in child development
or elementary education, are invited
to discuss their plans with Willard C.
Olson, Room 2509, University Elemen-
tary School.
Academic Notices
Final Examination Schedule, See-
and Semester, 1934-1935:
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, School of Education, School
of Music, School of Forestry and Con-
servation, College of Pharmacy,
School of Business Administration
and Graduate School.
Code Letter Date of Examination
A - Saturday a.m., June 1.
B - Tuesday a.m., June 4.
C - Monday a.m., June 3.
D - Wednesday a.m., June 5.
E - Monday a.m., June 10.
F - Saturday p.m., June 1.
G - Tuesday p.m., June 11.
H - Monday p.m., June 10.
I - Tuesday p.m., June 4.
J - Saturday p.m., June 8.
K -- Thursday p.m., June 6.
L -Tuesday a.m., June 11.
M - Monday p.m., June 3.
N - Friday a.m., June 7.
O -Saturday a.m., June 8.
P -- Thursday a.m., June 6.
Q - Friday p.m., June 7.
R - Wednesday p.m., June 5.
X- Each course in Group X may
be examined at any time mu-
tually agreed upon by class
and instructor.
Each course in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts, and in
the School of Music has a code let-
ter for examination purposes. Many
courses appearing in the Announce-
ment of the Graduate School carry
these code letters also. Other courses
not carrying the code letters will be
examined as follows:
Classes Date of Examination

Knode ............... 103 R. L.
Modder ............ 2231 A. H.
Morris .............. 3209 A. H.
Ogden ............... 201 S. W.
Peterson ............ B Haven
Proctor .............203 U. H.
Roellinger .......... 2003 A. H.
Rowe ................ 208 U. H.
Schenk .............. 2003 N. S.
Walcott ............ 1121 N. S.
Weaver ............. 2235 A. H.
Weimer ............ 1035 A. H.
W ells ................. 35 A. H.
Whitehall ............ 202 W. P.

2
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1

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Ml
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TL
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Tt
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on. at
on. at
on. at
on. at:
on. at
on. at
on. at
ues. at
ues. at
ues. at
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ues. at
ues. at
ues. at

8 -Saturday a.m., June 1
9 -Tuesday a.m., June 4.
10- Monday a.m., June 3.
11- Wednesday a.m., June 5.
1- Monday a.m., June 10.
2 - Saturday p.m., June 1.
3 -Tuesday p.m., June 11.
8 -Monday p.m., June 10.
9 -Tuesday p.m., June 4.
10- Saturday p.m., June 8.
11 -Thursday p.m., June 6.
1 - Tuesday a.m., June 11.
2 --Monday p.m., June 3.
3 - Friday a.m., June 7.

Williams ............ 215 A. H.
Aero. 6 - Final Examination: This
examination will be given on Thurs-
day, June 6, at 8 o'clock a.m. in Roomt
104 East Engineering Building. 1
Geology 12: Place of Final Exam-
ination: A-P (inclusive) in Natural
Science Auditorium, Q-Z in West
Gallery of Alumni Memorial Hall.,
Geography 1 and 2: Final examina-
tions: Prof. James' section of Geogra-
phy 2 in room 25 A.H. Dr. Kendall'sz
section of Geography 1 in room 25
A.H. Dr. Kendall's sections of Geog-
raphy 2 in room 209 A. H. For all
other sections, the regular class-
rooms.
German Department: The follow-,
ing is the room schedule for the final
examination for German 1, 2, 31 and
32:
German 1: Diamond and Graf,
C. Haven.{
German 2: Graf, Gaiss, Diamond,,
Willey, Reichart-N.S. Aud. Van
Duren, Wild, Van de Luyster, Strie-
dieck-W. Lee. Phys.
German 31: All sections-B Haven.
German 32: Van de Luyster, Wild,
Willey - 25 A.H. Van Duren, Eaton,
Gaiss, Stredieck - 1025 A.H.
Psychology 34 Final Examination:
Students with initials A through M
come to Room 1025 AH; N through
Z to Room C Haven Hall.
History 12: Lecture Group I. Final
examination Saturday a.m., June 1,
Mr. Long's and Mr. Winnacker's sec-
tions.
Sociology 51: Final examination- I
Thursday a.m., June 6. Mr. Fuller,
Natural Science Aud.; Mr. Hartung
and Prof. Holmes, 25 Angell Hall.
Psychology 42 Final Examination:
Students with initials A through M
come to Room 231 AH; N through Z
to Room 35 AH.
History 48: The sections in this
course will meet for the final exami-
To the Seniors who will
be starting their careers
soon, we extend our best
wishes for success and
happiness.
To those who may need
additional pictures later
on: our negatives are per-
manently kept on file for
your convenience-
'hotographer
332 South State Street

nation in the following rooms: Sec-
tion 4 in G Haven; sections 1, 2, 3, 5
in C Haven, Sat. p.m., June 8.
History 12: Group III. Review lec-
ture, Friday, May 31, at 7:30 p.m., 231
A.H.
Politcal Science 2-Final examina-
tion, Friday, June 7, at 2:00 p.m.
Professor Cuncannon's sections in
1035 AH.
Dr. Dorr's sections, 231 AH.
Mr. McCaffree's sections, 25 AH.
Mr. Kallenbach's sections, C Haven
Sociology 110: Final examination-
This code letter should be B instead
of K, as listed. Examination will be
held Tuesday a.m., June 4.
Events Today
Sigma Delta Chi will meet at 5:15
p.m. for short business meeting in the
offices of the Publications Building.
Order of business includes election of
officers for next year. All active
members are asked to attend.
Coming Events
Methodist Episcopal Church:
Sunday 10:45 a.m. - Morning Wor-
ship Service. Dr. C. W. Brashares has
chosen as a sermon subject, "Christ's
Alternative to Communism."

i

BLUEBOOKS
ALL SIZES
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE

11

Stalker Hall for Young Men and
Women of College Age: 340 South S
Sunday, 6:00 p.m.-Wesleyan
Guild Devotional Hour. The program
will be in the form of an informal

State St.

Delivery Service

U1

UNION BILLIARD ROOM
Open Daily until Summer School
and open throughout the Sum me r
until September First.
TICKER SERVICE ON ALL BASEBALL GAMES

t
i
1

discussion of current interest for 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion; 9:30 a.m.
those who wish to be with us. The Church School; 11:00 a.m. Kinder-
usual supper hour has been discon- garten; 11:00 a.m. Holy Communion
tinued until the opening of summer and sermon by the Reverend Henry
school. Lewis.
Botanical Journal Club: Annual
Congregational Church: supper picnic will take place at the
Service of worship at 10:30 Sun- Botanical Garden on Tuesday, June
day with sermon by the minister. Sub- 4, at 6 p.m. All botanists, members
ject, "Religion and Social Action," of their families and friends are priv-
including the program now being set ileged to attend. A charge of 35c (25c
up by the Congregational denomina- for small children) will be made.
tion for more closely relating the Those expecting to attend are asked
church in an active way to the social to sign on the blanks provided on the
needs of the hour. bulletin boards in the Natural Science
building, the Herbarium and the Bo-
Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church: tanical Garden, or to notify C. A. Ar-
Services of worship Sunday are: nold before Tuesday noon.

ii

Further, the courses listed below,
will be examined as follows:
Education Cl.-- Wednesday p.m.,
June 5.
Business Adm. 102 - Friday p.m.,
June 7.
Business Adm. 122-- Saturday a.m.,
June 8.
Business Adm. 152- Saturday a.m.,
June 1.
History 92: Final examination Sat-
urday p.m., June 1. Men students will
meet in W. Physics lecture room;
women students will meet in 25 AH.
Business Adm. 206- Thursday a.m.,
June 6.
Any course not listed in any of the
above groups may be examined at any
time on which the instructor and
class concerned may agree.
Each student taking practical work
in music in the School of Music will
be given an individual examination.
Each such student should consult the
bulletin board at the School of Music
to learn the day and hour assigned
for his or her individual examination.
Final examination in English I and
II: Tuesday, June 4, (p.m.):
Instructor Room
English I

USE

YOUR

UNION

SLATER'S, Inc.

t

Knode ............... 103 R. L.
Meyer ..............225 A. H.
Stevens,............1025 A. H.
Tuesday, June 4, (p.m.)
English H.
Allen ................ 2209 A.H.
Bader ................ 18 A. H.
Baker ................. 101 Ec.
Bebout .............. 209 A.H.
Boothe ............. 2054 N. S.
Cassidy .............. 229 A. H.
Everett ...... . .....1209 A. H.
Green ............... 205 M. H.
Helm ...............206 U. H.
Hornberger ..........C Haven.

for

The
Red Horse

Tavern

Whitmore Lake
-opening tonight
with Ross Harger
and his music
-luncheons, beer and
wines...

We buy IIl books whether they will be used here
again or not and pay CASH.
LIBERAL TRADE ALLOWANCE
IF YOU PREFER
qIAT1:P'R

"%w 4F 0 9 ETaft we qw ®ms- -

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