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May 28, 1935 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-05-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1935

w Measures
re Examined
By Fitzgerald
Governor Is Given Right
To Slash Expenditures
Under New Plan
LANSING, May 27.-- .P)--Gov.
Fitzgerald began the task today of
analyzing scores of measures left
on' his desk by the departed Legisla-
ture.
Despite the defeat of most of his
so-called governmental reform pro-
grain he possessed a weapon as pow-
erful as any he sought. A last-min-
ute amendment had placed in his
hands the power to balance the bud-
get. The measure, giving the execu-
tive authority to reduce appropria-
tions on a pro-rata basis when ex-
penditures threaten to exceed rev-
enues, was construed as meaning all
appropriations, including a grant es-
timated at more than $22,000,000 next
year for the public schools.
Indications were the governor will
instruct George R. Thompson, his
finance director, to determine how
cutting must be done to make the
budget fit revenues. He presumably
will place all institutions and depart-
ments on a strictly month-to-month
basis beginning with the fiscal year
starting July 1.
Under the legislative act he may,
at any time, order expenditures re-
duced to keep pace with revenues.
This procedure will make unnecessary
the vetoing of many items in the ap-
propriation bills to eliminate an in-
dicated $6,000,000 deficit. The gov-
ernor said it also removes the need
of a special session to repair the
budget.
Among the bills awaiting execu-
tive veto or approval were the $22,-
000,000 school aid bill, a "heart balm"
measure outlawing breach of prom-
ise, seduction and alienation of af-
fection suits (except against rela-
tives), a bill to limit hunting in pri-
vate pheasant reserves to legal bag
and season limits, University of Mich-
igan and Michigan State College
"yardstick" appropriations, a measure
prescribing felony penalties for rad-
ical activities, and many others.
Decoration Day
Plans Of ROTC
Are Announced
Plans for the annual Decoration
Day Parade of the R.O.T.C. were defi-
nitely announced yesterday by Lieut.
Col. F. C. Rogers. This ceremony,
the final one of the school year, will
be held in conjunction with the Amer-
ican Legion, the local National Guard
company, the G.A.R., and other civic
andpatriotic organizations of Ann
Arbor.
Assembly of the R.O.T.C. companies
is scheduled to start at 9:45 a.m. at
the National Guard Armory, Ann
Street and Fifth Avenue. Company
A is to form on Fifth Avenue north
of the Armory, with the remaining
three companies in order to the west.
The parade's line of march will be
west on Ann St. to Main St., south
along Main to Williams St., then east
to North University and Geddes. The
marchers will continue along Geddes
until they reach Woodlawn Ceme-
tery, where a service for the soldier
and sailor dead will be held.

Autogiro Lands On Roof Of New Post Office

-Associated Press Photo.
Another chapter in the history of the postoffice department was
written when an autogiro landed directly on the roof of the new $5,-
500,000 Philadelphia postoffice, picked up a load of mail, and soared
away. The feat was performed during exercises dedicating the big
building.

Modern Showboat
To Show Eskimos
Torrid Fan Dance
SEATTLE, May 27-(P)-The Es-
kimos are going to learn about the
fan dance this summer.
A showboat, carrying a fan dancer,
entertainers and a motion picture
machine, will leave here in a few
weeks for Alaskan waters.
"Up in the north, in the smaller
Indian and Eskimo villages, they have
no entertainment at all but an occa-
sional accordion, maybe a fiddle, and
the native dances and songs," said
Gordon Barteu, impressrio.
"Now for the first time they'll have
a showboat-none of this old Missis-
sippi stuff, but vaudeville and movies
such as we have in the states -they'll
be a revelation to the natives. I'm
an old-time Alaskan myself, so I know
they are starved for entertainment in
the inaccessible villages. Our little
boat will be able to put in almost any-
where along the coast, and we can
teach fan-dancing to any Eskimo."
Pretty girls are what most Alaskans
want to see, explained Barteu, so
they will be the mainstay of the show.

Counterfeiting
Ring Broken Up
By Government

Sixty Persons Accused
Passing $500,000
Spurious Notes

Of
In

Hawaii Host To
Fleet As Games
Draw To Close'
ABOARD BATTLESHIP PENN-
SYLVANIA, PEARL HARBOR, Ha-
waii, May 27.-- ()- One hundred
and ixty sleek warships were moored
in or near Pearl Harbor today as the
United States navy neared the end of
gigantic maneuvers in the Pacific.
The arrival of a marine expedition-
ary force was expected to complete
the return of all fleet forces partici-
pating in war games in the vicinity of
Midway Island, 1,350 miles northwest
of here.
Submarine division 12, comprising
the world's largest undersea craft,
put in here during the night, and
other vessels, mostly mine-sweepers
and tenders, were expected during the
day.
For the next three days, Hawaii
planned entertainment for the 50,-
000 officers and men of the fleet.
Anytime after Wednesday, how-
ever, all fleet units except those reg-
ularly based at Pearl Harbor will be
in readiness for orders from Admiral
J. M. Reeves, commander in chief,
for the final phases of the six weeks'
maneuvers.
5 Persons Hurt In
Weekend Accidents
Five persons were injured, three
seriously, in automobile accidents in
or near Ann Arbor over the wee -end.
In addition to these several minor
crashes occurred in which the occu-
pants of the cars escaped injury.
Two Dexter youths, Frank Horne
and Herman Elsasser, were seriously
injured when their car left the road
on US-12, east of Ann Arbor, and
collided with a telephone pole at
2 a.m. Sunday. Sheriff's officers who
investigated reported that the car was
apparently traveling at a high rate
of speed. The vehicle was completely
demolished.
David french
Is Appointed
To Fellowship
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, coun-
selor in religious education, an-
nounced yesterday the appointment
of David G. French, '35, of Cairo, to
a fellowship at the Chicago Theolog-
ical Seminary. The fellowship is one
of five given to the Big Ten univer-
sities.
In summarizing the work of the
graduating classes of the last four
years in this field, Dr. Blakeman
said that nineteen persons have en-
tered the calling of the church, three
of whom are now active in their re-
spective ministeries, four of whom
are now missionaries, while the re-
maining ten are working at seminar-
ies.
Dr. Blakeman remarked that while
it is not the object of a state uni-
versity to give professional training
for the church, it is the duty of every
college or university to lay the
groundwork for this as well as every
other profession. "At present," he
said, "there are more than fifty
courses in the University curriculum
which would be quite essential in
preparing for the ministry or for so-
cial service work.
"These courses are widely scattered
throughout the curriculum, chiefly
in the philosophy, Oriental language,
and sociology departments, and they
may be elected by all seniors. We
are pleased to have students hold in
mind that annually three fellowships

- two of $500 each, and one of $600
- are given to students of superior
ability graduating from the University
of Michigan and expecting to enter
graduate study in religion."

FACULTY FOR 1935 -1936

-Associated Press Photo.
J. R. McCarl (above), comp-
troller general, told the House mili-
tary committto an abstract of an
audit of TVA affairs was substan-
tially correct and showed "no in-
tention to mislead." Shortly after-
ward, the committee voted to table
a measure which would have en-
larged powers of the Tennessee
valley authority.
Wounded Man Clue
To Extortion Plot
PASADENA, Calif., May 27-(R)-
A critically wounded man was the
chief clew of federal agents today in
their efforts to solve a $72,000 extor-
tion plot directed at Herbert D. Ivey,
wealthy southern California banker.
They sought the true identity of
the man who gasped out his name
as "Jack Williams" after he had been
shot in a trap. They also were at-
tempting to locate his hideout and to
round up "the ten of us," mentioned
in numerous notes sent to Ivey.
"Williams was shot late Saturday
night when federal agents and San
Marino police opened fire on an auto-
mobile they said was fol'lowing them.

GEORGE F. ANDERSON
(LL.B., Northwestern)
EDWIN C. AUSTIN
(A.B., Wisconsin, LL.B., Northwestern)
ARTHUR M. BARNHART
(A.B., Princeton; LL.B., Harvard)
GRENvILLE BEARDSLEY
(A.B., Knox; J.D., John Marshall)
HERBERT BEBB
(A.B., U. of Ill.; J.D., U. of Chicago)
CHARLES CENTER CASE
(LL.B., Northwestern)
MORTON C. CRESSY
(A.B., Yale; LL.B., Harvard)
PALMER D. EDMUNDS
(A.B., Knox; LL.B., Harvard)
REUBEN FREEDMAN
(A.B., U. of Manchester, Eng.; J.D.)
MICHAEL GESAS
(LL.B., John Marshall Law School)
GEORGE E. HARBERT,
(LL.B., Notre Dame University
EDWARD B. HAYES
(A.B., U. of Ili.; LL.B., Harvard)

LLOYD D. HETH
(A.B., Beloit College)
HARRY EUGENE KELLY
(Ph.B., A.M., University of Iowa)
NOBLE W. LEE
(A.B., Harvard; J.D., John Marshall)
ROBERT McMURDY
(LL.M., University of Michigan)
JAMES WALKER MILNE
(A.B., Monmouth; J.D., U. of Chicago)
HON. GEORGE FRED RUSH
(A.M. University of Michigan)
LEWIS A. STEBBINS
(LL.B., University of Kansas)
HAROLD G. TOWNSEND
(A.B., Beloit; LL.B., Hlarvardi)
THORLEY VON HOLST
(LL.B., Valparaiso University)
ALBERT E. WILSON
(A.B., Hobart College)
VICTOR S. YARROS
L~L.B., N.Y. Law School)

Defends TVA Audit

Fall Meetings To
Bring_1,500 Here
Charles A. Fisher, assistant direc-
tor of the University Extension Di -c
vision, announced yesterday the fall t
meetings of three institutes which are
expected to bring 1,500 visitors to Ann
Arbor during the month of October.
The Conservation TnStitute will
convene during the first week of Oc-
tober. This meeting is in conjunction
with the Garden Clubs of Michigan.
The Woman's Club Institute, in
conjunction with the Michigan Fed-,

eration of Women's Clubs, will hold
its state convention here the week of
October 14.
The third institute meeting, to be
held on October 31 and November
1, will be that of the Parents' Edu-
cational Institute in conjunction with
the Michigan Congress of Parents and
Teachers.
'4servations and Tickets Hets. No Extra Chess,
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
k ...rig.Li.ne.d - Banded.,. se 1917
OFFICIAL For All Leading Steamship Lines
AGENCY Tours, Cruises & Tourist Com's
601 E. Huron, Ann Arbor. Ph. 6412

Catalog and Pamphlet on "The Study of Law and Proper Preparation" sent free.
EDWARD T. LEE, Dean, 315 Plymouth Court, Chicago

THE JOHN MARSHALL LAW SCHOOL

Thirty-sixth Year - An Accredited Law School.
Evening Law School with Day School Standards.
Courses Lead to LL.B., LL.M. and J.D. Degrees.
Text and Case Method. Moot Court Practice.

Your Photograph in

Positions Announced
For Switgout Today
The following'positions for the var-
ious schools about the medallion in
front of the library for Swingout
today were announced yesterday by
Allen D. McCombs, '35, chairman of
the Swingout committee.
Literary seniors on the diagonal
toward the Natural Science Building;
engineers, 'on the diagonal toward
the engineering arch; architects,
directly behind the engineers; medi-
cal students, on the walk extending
toward University Hall; lawyers, be-
hind the medical students; dentistry
students, on the walk toward the
Pharmacy Building; pharmacists,
directly behind the dentists; gradu-
ates, on the walk extending toward
the Romance Language Building; ed-
ucation students, directly behind the
graduates; nurses and business ad-
ministration seniors, after the edu-
cation students; foresters, behind the
nurses and business administration
students.
CANDIDATES ANNOUNCED
There are 20 candidates for the
Certificate in Journalism, Professor
John L. Brumm of the journalism
department announced yesterday.
To receive the Certificate, a stu-
dent must have completed one of the
curricula in journalism with at least
a "B" average. The awards will be
made at Commencement.

DETROIT, May 27 - (P) - With
60 men and women under arrest in
four cities, a counterfeiting ring which
federal agents believe has passed more
than $500,000 in spurious notes, has
been broken up, Bert C. Brown, head
of the federal secret service here an-
nounced today.
Brown made the announcement
after agents had arrested two women
here, in connection with the investi-
gation.
Eight persons arrested in Detroit
already have been sent to Chicago
for trial, and the two women, regis-
tered as Marie Rautsau of Dayton,
and Helen Brown of Richmond, Ind.,
will be sent there Wednesday, Brown
said. There are charged with passing
the notes.
Brown said that Richard W. Adams,
a Milwaukee photo-engraver, is held
at Chicago for trial on a counterfeit-
ing charge as the head of the ring,
which has been operating for six years.
Mrs. Ella Zahn of Belleville, Ill., whose
husband, Lester Zahn, now is serving
a five-year term at Leavenworth pen-
itentiary on a counterfeiting charge,
also is held for trial with Adams.
The hunt for members of the ring
was begun here last February, Brown.
said, but took the agents to several
cities since the equipment was moved
frequently.
The 60 under arrest were appre-
hended in Detroit, Chicago, Cincin-
nati and Philadelphia. Most of them
were distributors of the notes, Brown
said, which were of $5, $10, and $20
denominations.
Virgil V. McNitt
Is Campus Visitor
Virgil V. McNitt, donor of the Mc-
Naught Awards in Journalism, spent
the week-end as the guest of Professor
John L. Brumm of the journalism de-
partment: During his short visit Mr.
McNitt conferred with a number of
students about future employment.
Mr. McNitt, besides publishing a
daily newspaper in Southbridge,
Mass., is the owner of the McNaught
Syndicate in New York City and is.
one of the founders of the magazine,
"Today," edited by Raymond Moley.

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Snared by a Sappy Seal?
...*/4}At awnO/c/?oleQ

State Official Aims
At New Tax Laws
LANSING, May 27. - IVP)--Speaker
George A. Schroeder announced to-
day that he hopes to effect a reor-
ganization of the legislative council
to draft a board program of delin-
quent tax relief.
The speaker said Gov. Fitzgerald
has indicated he believes a special,
session of the legislature to rewrite
taxation laws this fall is unavoidable.
He will confer with the governor this
week, he said, to offer services of the
council.
"The lack of accomplishment of the
session just ended may be blamed di-
rectly on the fact that the 1935 leg-
islative council had no time to pre-
pare a constructive program," the
speaker said. "Special sessions of the
1933 legislature precluded an oppor-
tunity to study the problems which
were faced by 1935 legislators."
See the pen you
TAILOR to fit your
writing. With a
"I Safety Ink Shut-Off
that ends messiness.
"'' Fills with one stroke.

-M.tAT E JThEET
E -JE IT RU
JEWEL-R
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING

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