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May 11, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-05-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Owens
,Ward's Injury
May Keep Him
Out Of Even

Leads Buc
Ohio State

keye

Trackmen Against Michigan

Today

Tennis

Team Here

Today; Golfers

At Illinois

t '
tS

W-% 1 0 r *l - -1

Sam Stoller Seeks Victory
Over Ohio Flash In The
Broad Jump, Dashes
Michigan and Ohio State will meet
this afternoon on Ferry Field in what
is expected to be the feature event
of the Big Ten dual track meet sea-
son and a preview of the Conference
meet which will be held here May 24
and 25. Michigan, indoor titlehold-
ers, will be out to duplicate the sensa-
tional victory scored indoors over
the Buckeye squad.
The field events will begin at 1:45
p.m. and the track events, beginning
with the mile run, at 2 p.m.
The meet will mark the first ap-
pearance outdoors here of Jesse
Owens, 'most brilliant of the current
crop of sprinters, but the condition
of Willis Ward's minjured leg may
eliminate the possibility of another
duel between him and the Buckeye
flash which featured their indoor
meeting. In that meeting Ward
twice bested Owens, in the 60-yard
dash and the high hurdles, and fin-
ished second in the low hurdles.
Ward Takes No Chances
Ward is nursing the leg which was
injured two weeks ago at the Penn
Relays, and will take no,chance on
again hurting it with the important
Conference meet two weeks away.
In Ward's absence the Wolverine
attempts to halt the fleet Owens will
be led by Sam Stoller, the sophomore
star, who will compete against the
Buckeye flash in the hundred, 220,
and broad jump.
Even without Ward, however, the
Wolverines are confident of victory
over the Scarlet forces on the basis
of superior strength and balance.
Michigan looks for victories in the
mile and two-mile, javelin, discus,
high and low hurdles, and possible
wins in the half-mile and quarter-
mile.
Smith, Brelsford Battle In Mile
Clayton Brelsford, the sophomore
star, and Capt. Harvey Smith of
Michigan are favored to furnish one
of the best duels of the 'meet in the
mile, with Smith expected to have
regained his form. The sophomore
ace, Conference champion indoors,
has defeated his captain in their last
two meetings. In the two-mile run
Walter Stone, another sophomore
star, is expected to handle all Buck-
eye competition.
With the Buckeyes weak in the
javelin and discus, Adam Stone and
Bob Kositchek will be favored in the
javelin event and Skip Etchells in
the discus. In the shot put, how-
ever, George Neal and Joe Schwartz
will be favorites to place one-two.
Another Wolverine star, Bob Os-
good, will be favored in both hurdles
events over Ken Seitz, the Buckey
sophomore, and Moreau Hunt, the
Michigan junior.
Beetham Is Middle-Distance Threat
Charles Beetham, who with Owens
heads the Buckeye parade, will fur-
nish the Wolverine middle-distance
runners with competition. He will
meet Paul Gorman, Frank Aikens
and Howard Davidsn in the half-
mile, and an entry of Stan Birleson
and Harvey Patton in the quarter.
Beetham will be supported in the 880
by Cliff Smith, and in the 440 by
Smith and Ed Gazdik.
Melvin Walker, with Ward out,
will be the outstanding high jumper
on the field, but even his reputation,
based on a best jump of 6 feet 4
inches indoors, may not stand before
Konrad Moisio, Michigan's indoor
Conference champion and noted as
a "money jumper." The Buckeye
look for another victory in the pole
vault by John Wonsowitz, over Dave
Hunn of Michigan, who has failed to
show his best form during the out-
door season while the Buckeye sen-
ior has done 13 feet 6 inches.
Big Ten Standings

tankings tii *
Uncertain For CTAD
Today's Match
hio State Is First Team I DUST
To Score On Wildcats,
R* ! 4. 2_9 *--By ART CARSTENS-

Fischer, Kocsis Michi-an Links Stand Alone BREADON DENIES RUMORS
ST LOUIS, May 10- (,P) - Sam
Remain Behind I T" Nati ra1 R. Beat A nd Des i !on Breadon. president of the St. Louis

0

I LL DK~t

Michigan's tennis players, bent on
a victory which will indicate just
about where they stand in Confer-
ence rating, will meet Ohio State at
1:30 p.m. today on the Ferry Field
courts. Ohio State yesterday bowed
to the Northwestern team at Ferry
Field, 4 to 2, after the latter shut
out the Maize and Blue the previous
afternoon.
That Ohio State was able to run up
a score against the Wildcats attests
to their strength, for in four matches
played by the Purple the Buckeyes
have been the only players to win a
single victory.
Russell Ball, Wildcat star who eked
out a three-set victory over Howie
Kahn Thursday afternoon, lost to
the Buckeye No. 2 player, Bob Nilhou-
sen, 7-5, 4-6, 3-6. Paul Iams and Cly-
mer, the Scarlet and Gray No. 2
doubles team, swept through Rugg
and Doherty in straight sets, 6-3, 8-6.
Ball Defeats Chambers
George Ball, Northwestern No. 1
ace, allowed Bill Chambers as many
games as Bob Anderson won from him
Thursday, winning 6-1, 6-3.
Rugg and Doherty took the remain-
ing singles matches without much
difficulty, and the Ball brothers de-
feated Ohio State's No. 1 doubles com-
bination of Chambers and Nilhousen,
3-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Michigan's ranking in today's
matches is still uncertain. It is fair-
ly safe to assert that Howie Kahn
will be playing near the top, as he,
so far, has the best record among the
Wolverines. Kahn's three-set match
with Russell Ball was the high spot
of the Michigan-Northwestern con-
test Thursday, and Coach John John-
stone was very pleased with his per-
formance.
Ohio Brings Five Men
The Scarlet and Gray will present
a five-man line-up, so in all likeli-
hood there will be five singles matches
and two doubles on this afternoon's
program.
Bill Chambers, runner-up in the
National Inter-City doubles tourna-
ment, will present the stiffest opposi-
tion to be expected from the Buck-J
eyes.+
To oppose this aggregation, Coach
Johnstone has, besides Howie Kahn,
Bob Anderson, who has been playing
No. 1 this week, Sam Siegel, and Mil-
ler Sherwood, of his former first
bracket. The recent showings of
Johnny Rodriguez, Ted Thorward,
Jarvis Dean and Milton Eskowitz, all
of whom have played against Big Ten
opposition within the past week, may
alter his previous lineup, however, for
he regards them all as about equal.-
BOX SCOR E

WJITH INTEREST in today's dual
track meet running high permit
us to suggest that it is not too soon
for students to buy their tickets for
the Conference meet here May 24
and 25, or two weeks from yesterday
and today.
The most recent word from
Harry Tillotson is 'that 40-cent
student tickets for either day are
now on sale. The regular ticket
price is $1.10 and will assure the
purchaser of a choice reserved
scat for both the Friday prelim-
inaries and the Saturday finals.
Personally, we recommend the pur-
chase of the $1.10 ticket. While the
40 cent student seats will be reserved
on Saturday they will not be in as
good a section as the general admis-
sion tickets. Student tickets will ad-
mit only to the unreserved sections
on Friday.
For the sum of 30 cents, the dif-
ference betweent two student tickets
and the $1.10 general admission price,
the purchaser is assured of the best
possible seats each day.
Anyway, whether you buy the
40 cent or $1.10 tickets, better do
it now, or you'll find yourself
sitting astride thc field house
roof with a telescope on Saturday
afternoon a fortnight hence.
* * *.
YOUR HUMBLE servant spent a
quiet afternoon on the Municipal
golf course yesterday, pursuing the
elusive white pellet. Your humble
servant is not a great golfer, indeed
not even a mediocre golfer. In fact
he had 119 for the 18 holes. That, as
you have probably guessed, is several
strokes over par. But no one cared
particularly.
When, with a gale at my back, I
smashed a screaming 150-yard drive
straight down the fairway, my heart
leaped with the joy that comes only
once in a lifetime. When a 40-foot
putt trickled into the cup to win a
ten-cent bet I threw myself upon
the yielding turf of the green and
rolled in ecstasy.
That's the way golf affects you,
though. I'm only one of 25,000,-
000 nuts who betray similar
symptoms. Like them I religious-
ly refrain from mention of all
shots that weren't what they were
meant to be. Drives that plunked
into the river, approach shots
that approach, and putts that
rolled like greased lightning and
ended up on the farther edge of
the green.
This Municipal layout, while not
of championship length or difficulty,
affords a lot of fun. A practically
negligible amount of rough gives duf-
fers like me a chance to roam at will.
However, there are sundry creeks,
a roaring river, stone walls, thick for-
ests and a railroad track with which
the tyro may amuse himself - if he is
as bad as I was yesterday. I know
them all by bitter personal acquaint-
ance.,
An interesting sidelight on today's
Ohio-Michigan track meet is the war-
time experience of the rival coaches,
Larry Snyder and Chuck Hoyt. Sny-
der served as a second lieutenant
pilot instructor in the aviation corps,
and from there went to Ohio State
as a student.
Hoyt, after compiling an enviable
dash record at Grinnell college, joined
the navy and was commissioned as an
ensign assigned to inspection of sea-
planes.
NAME LIVES ON
The Preakness, Maryland's most
famous race, is named after the horse
who first won it - Preakness.

- Card
MalloyIs No 1- from
By FRED BUESSER first ridge affords a view of at least Club
It was designed by the most fa- five greens and five tees, and the only the N
Michigan Stars 5 y F mous architects in the country, it play that is not visible from within
Mcia Str Stay ForI, inga
. is considered better than that pos- two or three minutes walk of No. 11 to t
Distric Natsessed by any other college in Amer- tee is that which takes place over the Yank
ionalOpenica, it is Director Yost's pet among second ridge on two or three holes, Nati
all his athletic interests, and it was notably two, four, and five.
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., May 10 - The named by Walter Hagen when he
Michigan golf squad arrived here this played it in 1932 as the best condi-
afternoon without its two best play- tioned of the season. You guessed it.
ers, Johnny Fischer and Chuck Koc- It's the University golf course, lo-
sis, who are attempting to qualify cated right here at Michigan. and j
for the National Open in district open to the play of student and chain-
trials held this week-end. pions alike.
When the final pans and appro-
Immediately upon arrival Prof. Wens the fal for and o -
priations were mnade for the construe--v
Thomas C. Trueblood, coach, took tion of a University golf course in the<
the squad out to inspect the Urbana late twenties, Director Yost scouted°
Country Club Course where the match about for golf course architects. He
will be played with the Illinois links- was, fortunate enough to secure the
men Saturday morning, best in the business in the person of
McKensie and Maxwell, premier
Play Five Afternoon Matches course designers and the architects
The match will consist of two best- of the famous Ardmore.
ball foursomes and one singles match The links which these men pro-
played in the morning, and five duced is perhaps one of the best
singles matches played in the after- competitive courses in the country
noon. The probable pairings in the and is certainly without peer in the
morning will bring Kokes and Barr collegiate world, with the possible ex-
of Illinois against Markham and ception of Yale's new course which is"
Saunders of Michigan in the other. not yet in the best of condition.
In the one individual match of the J The real greatness of the course
morning round, Larry David of Mich- lies in its design. On probably no
igan will in all probability oppose Bud other in America can be found a more
Mickleson. natural lay-out, no course where bet-
In the afternoon round the above- ter use is made of the natural terrain'
mentioned five men of each squad in the construction of the entire
metioned fiver men ofieh squad eighteen holes. Nowhere are to be
will play another in five singles found the evidences of much excava-
matches, and although the exact tion, the greens are nestled in na-
pairings have not been definitely de- tural hollows, and the fairways
cided upon by the rival coaches, stretch beautifully along level or
Woody Malloy of the Wolverines will gently rolling ground that was in need
undoubtedly play number one for of very little preparation.
Michigan and battle Will Kokes, From the spectator's viewpoint the
Illini ranking golfer, in what should University course is really ideal. The_ _
be the best -match of the afternoon. - -----__------------ _____

inals, today denied, a report

New York that National League
owners had collaborated with
New York Americans in arrang-
a deal whereby Babe Ruth went
he Boston Nationals and the
kees got their pick of a list of
onal League pitchers.
PLAYINGA
TODAY?
Enjoy your game on a
course that is carefully
kept, that has beauti-
ful bent grass greens,
and rolling fairways.
FEES
WEEK DAYS
Nine Holes . . . . 25c
Eighteen Holes. .35c
All Day . . . . . . 50c
Saturday and Sunday
Nine Holes... .25c
Eighteen Holes ..50c
MUNICIPAL

u

Illini Have Won Two
Illinois boasts a victory over In-
diana which was scored last Satur-
day in a thrilling dual meet, 14-13,
when Kokes led the Illini linksmen
with a 36-hole total of 145, just one
over par for the day, and a more
decisive win over Northwestern, whom
they beat, 172-191, over a treach-
erous and rain-swept course. Kokes
and Bud O'Neal led the onslaught
against the Purple, each carding 74's.
The match with the Wolverines,
Big Ten and national collegiate
champions, will provide the real test
for the Illini. With Kocsis and
Fischer out of the Michigan line-up
they are conceded a good chance of
toppling the Maize and Blue golfers
from the pedestal of Conference Su-
premacy upon which they have
perched themselves for the last three
years.
Sullivan Beats
Senators, 8-4,
For Third Win
A five-run rally in the seventh in-
ning allowed the Detroit Tigers to
break a tie at two runs and defeat the
Washington Senators by the score of
8-4.
Joe Sullivan, star Bengal rookie,
limited the Nationals to seven hits
in winning his third consecutive vic-
tory of the season.
Other scores were:
American League
Boston 12, Chicago 2.
New York 6, Cleveland 3.
Philadelphia 7, St. Louis 4.
National League
All games postponed, rain and cold
weather.
WHITE Nu-Buck OXFORDS
for MEN in 4 styles at $3.50
H. W. CLARK
English Boot Maker
534-536 Foiest Avenue

COOKING UTENSILS

REMAIN.

OHIO STATE AB]
Prosenjak, rf .....4
Wickel, 3b ........5
Clowson, 2b (C) . .4
McAfee, lb .......5
Ulrich, p .........4
Faurot, cf ........4
Mosier, c.... ...4
Dye, ss ..........3
Hamilton, lf ......3

Totals
MICHIGAN
Ford, 3b ...
Rudness, cf
Paulson, 2b
Oliver, lb
Regeczi, If .
Teitelbaum,
Heyliger, rf
Williams, c
Larson, p

c

. --36
AB
.... ,.. 3
.. 5
.. 4
.. 4
.. 3
ss . . . .2
.. 3
.. 2
.. 4

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
4
R
1
1
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
6

H
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
H
0
2
1
2
1
0
0
1
1
8

PO
1
0
3
12
1
0
1
2
4
24
PO
0
1
0
17
1
0
2
6
0
27
R

A
0
2
4
0
4
0
1
3
0
14
A
2
1
3
0
0
8
0
0
3
17
H
6
8

ELECTRIC

HEAT

IS

AS

CIL E A N

AS

30

Chicago ...............
Illinois ................
Minnesota ............ .
Michigan ..............
Ohio State ............

W
.4
.5
.3
.3
.4

L Pet.
1 .800
2 .714
1 .666
2 .600
3 .571
3 .400
3 .400
4 .333
4 .3331
4 .2001

Totals.......

Score by innings:

Ohio State . .. . 100 201 000-4
Michigan .....002 400 000-6

SUNLIGHT!

Iowa ..................2
Northwestern ..........2
Indiana ...............2
Purdue '............ . 2
Wisconsin .............1
Yesterday's Results
Michigan 6, Ohio State 4.
Minnesota 3, Wisconsin 1.
Purdue 7, Indiana 6.
Chicago 5, Iowa 4.

Two base hits, Oliver, Hamilton:
three base hits, Clowson; stolen bases,
Paulson 2, Wiliams, Clowson, Mosier;
sacrifice hits, Teitelbaum 2, Ford;
struck out, by Larson 6, by Ulrich 0;
bases on balls, off Larson 5, off Ul-
rich 6; hit by pitcher, by Larson
(Prosenjak); left on bases, Michigan
7, Ohio State 11; double plays, Ohio
State (Dye to Clowson to McAfee);
passed balls, Williams, Mosier. Um-
pires, Slavin and Snyder. Time, 1:50.

1

4. ,ea

*

IN FORM?
Winter ruins form, but Spring
revives youth and vitality. Feel
the thrill of real enjoyment by
frequently playing on our su-
perb course. Rolling fairways,
sparkling streams, p e r f e c t
greens-- but plenty of hazards
-ail will add to your enjoy.
ment.

YOU can rub a white glove over
the bottom of a cooking utensil
that has just been used on an elec-
tric range ... and the glove will
remain spotless. This is because an
electric range cooks without combus-
tion-and consequently without the
products of combustion. There is no
dirt or soot to deposit on the bottoms
of pots and pans. Cooking utensils
stay bright, and shiny after long use
on an electric range. Youdo not have
to scour them after each cooking
operation and there is no caking of
grease to discolor them. .

Electric heat is as clean as sunlight.
There is no smoke or soot to darken
kitchen walls and curtains. An electric
range makes it easy to have a bright,
pleasant kitchen. Walls and curtains
do not require nearlyso frequentclean-
ing, and your kitchen can be made as
attractive as any room in the house.
You can own a modern electric range
for $89.50-completely installed and
ready to cook. Once you have used
an electric range, you will wonder
how you, ever did without it. See the
latest models on display at your
dealer's or the Detroit Edison office.

GOLF means
.Suede Jackets
;: GREENE'S feature individual
cleaning and inspection that more

I

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