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May 08, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I,

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1935

Conference Of
Teachers Will
MeetSaturday
School Of Education To
Sponsor Gathering In
Gaylord

British King And Queen Attend Jubilee Service

M
4

An educational conference for the
administrative and supervisory offi-
cials in schools of the upper part of
Lower Michigan will be held Saturday.
May 11, at Gaylord under the spon-
sorship of the University Extension
Division and the School of Education.
The program of the conference will
deal with important findings of edu-
cational investigations in selected
fields with special attention to the ap-
plication of such findings to the im-
provement of school practice.
Those who will conduct the discus-
sions are Professors Clifford Woody,
William Trow, Edgar Johnston, and
Franci Curtis, all of the education
school.
The topics to be considered by the
conference will include the behavior
problems of pupils, the instruction of
slow normal pupils, the improvement
of reading, and the redirection of
extra-curricular activities.
A large attendance from the forty
schools in the upper part of the Lower
Peninsula is indicated by the response
thus far, according to Dean James
B. Edmonson of the educational
school.
"The/ School of Education, in co-
operation with the Extension Division,
is devoting much attention to the
development of field courses and
field conference that will help educa-
tional administrators to keep in-
formed concerning significant find-
ings in educational research and to
assist these officials in their efforts]
to improve school practice," Dean
Edinonson said. "Our plans have met
With the most enthusiastic response
from Michigan school officials."
Sharp Increase
In'Mechanical
Ij lj*ies' Nted
A sharp increase in the number of
"mechanical injuries" was noted in
April, due to the desire of students
to participate in games which spring
weather makes possible, according to
the monthly report of the Health
Service released yesterday by Dr.
Maurice R. McGarvey, Health Service
physician.
"ractures, sprains, wounds, bruises,
infections of the skin and dog-bites
gave us no little concern," Dr. Mc-
Garvey stated, "and were often ser-
iously incapacitating to the afflicted
individuals. We anticipate injuries
from violent physical contact, but we
continue to offer pointed suggestions
of prevention in many cases of in-
jury due to carelessness."
Dr. McGarvey viewed with alarm
the number of bicycles on the streets
and said from Health Service experi-
ence in injuries sustained from acci-
dents to bicycle riders that he con-
cluded that they do not have a
"chance with their life or limb" in
contact with automobiles, concrete
pavemnent, or both.
Plan Beautification
Of Ypsilanti Road
Extensive plans for the beautifica-
tion of highway M-17 between Ann
Arbor and Ypsilanti have been an-
nounced by the Washtenaw County
Roadside Council.
The council is now undertaking a
two weeks' drive to procure from
Murray D. Van Wagoner, state high-
way commissioner, formal acceptance
of a project which would, according
to the members of the council, trans-
form this highway into a corridor of
trees, bordered by flowering shrub-
bery and trees.

Committee For
Building Show
Begins Plans1
Plans for the most complete build-
ing show ever to be staged in Anni
Arbor or vicinity were started yester-
day with the announcement by the
members of the show committee that
exhibits by nearly every firm in the
city connected with the construction
industry will be housed in Grangers'
Ballroom.
The show has been gradually in-
creasing in its scope since its original
inception by a group of local con-
struction workers. The tentative date
for the opening of the show has been,
set at May 20, and it will continue for
a month or six weeks according to the
plans of the committee.
Building tradesmen and construc-
tion supply companies as well as the
persons and firms locally connected
with them will be approached in the
near future by the show committee
headed by Mr. H. R. Buehler. A meet-
ing will be held soon to arrange the
disposition of the various exhibits, it
was announced.
Clyde N. Keppel, for many years a
building contractor, has been ap-
pointed by the show committee and
the Ann Arbor chamber of commerce,
which is cooperating in arrangements
for the display, to manage the show.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Con tinued from Page 2)
of the year. Election of officers for
the coming year will take place. If
you are interested in the annual pic-
nic, be there to discuss plans for it
and to select a day for it to be held.
There will be no speaker for the
meeting. Information concerning our
plans for Engineering Open House
will be included in the reports.
Electrical Engineers: Meeting of
the student branch of the A.I.E.E. at
7:30 p.m., Room 248, Thursday, May
9. Officers for next year will be
elected at that time. All Juniors
are especially urged to attend. Re-
freshments.
League Merit System Committee:
Important meeting Thursday at 4:30
in the Undergraduate Office. All
members must be present.
Phi Tau Alpha, societas honorifica.
Latina Graecaque, die Jovis, Maii
nono, hora usitata, in hospitum Mu-
lierum Michiganensium conveniet.
Disputatio ultima de litteris Latinis
medii aevi a comitibus quisbusdam
agetur. Emendatio constitutionis
proponetur quae ad electionem prae-
fectorum attinet.
Wesleyan Students Guild: Hike and
and roast, Friday, May 10. Meet at

Stalker Hall at 5 o'clock. Call 6881
by Thursday for reservations. There
will be a small cover charge.
U-M Outdoor Club will hold its an-
nual spring party Saturday after-
noon and evening, May 11. at the'
Sylvan Estates Country Club. At this
time the members of the council of
the club for next year will be elected.
In the afternoon there will be base-
ball, hiking, and swimming. After
the dinner and meeting at the club-
house there will be games and danc-
ing. The group will leave town about
1:30 and return after 11 p.m. Any
students-interested in outdoor activi-
ties is invited. Reservations for sup-
per and transportation must be made
with James Loughman, 23677, or a
council member before Friday. Total
cost will be approximately 70 cents.
Senior Ball Committee will meet
Thursday, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Un-
ion.
FIVE ARE DROWNED
PELOUSAS, La., May 6 -(,P)- Five
persons drowned near here today in
floodwater caused by a heavy week-
end rain. A search was being made
for the bodies.
WHITE Nu-Buck OXFORDS
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-Associated Press Photo.
This Associated Press picture, sent by radio from London to New York, shows King George and Queen
Mary of Great Britain as they attended services in amnient St. Paul's cathedral during the opening of the

i

r1

silver jubilee marking the king's twenty-fifth anniversary on the throne.
in the celebration.

The entire British empire joined

pen House Will

EngineeringO enouse
Feature Light Beam Broadcast

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
in a series of articles dealing with the
exhibits that have been planned for
the Engineering Open House which
will be held in conjunction with Spring
Homecoming May 17 and 18.
By RALPH W. HURD
A special demonstration of the abil-
ity of sound to be transmitted over
a light beam will be featured by the
electrical engineejIng department as
part of its displays for the Engineer-
ing Open House.
The original sound will be picked
up by a phonograph, and carried
through a microphone to an ampli-'
fier connected to a neon tube. The
light from the tube will thus be mod-
ulated in accordance with the im-
pression made by the sound. This
light beam will be fodused.on a photo-
electric cell which will convert the
light into a modulated current. An
amplifier and loudspeaker following
the photo-electric cell will then repro-
duce the original sound, and tie dem-
onstration will be complete.
There also will be an oscillograph
connected to the photo-electric cell,
which will show a picture of the sound
coming through the loudspeaker. Vis-
itors will be allowed to talk over the
light beam and both hear and see
their own voices.
The "talking statue" and the "danc-
ing doll" will be the subject of an-
other project. By means of a spe-
cially constructed lighting box a sta-
tue can be made to appear to smile,
frown, grin, be dignified and even
seem to talk. In the same box a doll
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-educational
College Degree or Two Years of
College Work with Good Grades
Required for Entrance
Transcript of Record Must Be Furnished
:Morning, Early Afternoon and
Evening Classes
For further information address
CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar
233 Broadway, New York

will appear as an animated dancer.
This is all accomplished by controlled
lighting.
Also included in the lighting display
will be a working scale model of the
Union Ballroom's colored lights. Their
operation will be explained by student
attendants, to the satisfaction of
many who have long been curious as
to the mechanics of this attractive'
lighting system.
A voice inverter of the type used in
trans-Atlantic telephony will be in
operation during the Open House.
Visitors saying "I think this is
strange" into a microphone will hear
reproduced "I kniht siht si egnarts,"
and if they are able to repeat the
latter "garble" they will have their
original intelligible words reproduced.

Health Service Filled
By Measles And Colds
Measles and an unusually large
number of colds have filled the in-
firmary to capacity, Dr. William M.
Brace, Health Service physician,
stated yesterday.
"The sharp rise in the number of
colds at this time of the year is rather
unusual," Dr. Brace said. "Most of
them are of the type known as 'spring
colds,' and are probably traceable to
the present inclement weather."
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