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April 16, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-04-16

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THE MICHIGANDAILY

'%Xp 4SKZ&jwLt .

THE MIHIAN AIY _..S I£AA

LAT E
WIRE
NEWS

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
lubI31ataon In the Bulletin Is construotive notice to all members of the
Unlyprity. CODY received at the offce of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:30 an. Saturday.

Surveying Camp

Prepared For Summer

Classified birectory

LAUNDRY

First Commercial Flight
To Hawaii Starts Today
ALAMEDA, Calif., April 15 -(A)-
Trail-blazer of a commercial air line;
to the Orient, the Pan-American Clip-
per is scheduled to begin a.2,400-mile
flight to Hawaii at 4 p.m. (Pacific
standard time) tomorrow.
The 19-ton flying boat went aloft
today on the final test flight of a
series which engineers said, hadthor-
oughly proved the accuracy of a new
radio compass.
Edwin C. Musick will be in com-
mand of the four-motored amphibian
for the flight to inaugurate an 8,500-
mile transport service between the
United States and the Orient.
Ten persons have lost their lives in
flights from California to Hawaii,
but several others have made the
flight successfully. The Clipper was
flown on test flights for total dis-
tances of more than six times that
between here and Honolulu.
Finre Indictment To Be
Pressed Against Insu ll
WASHINGTON, April 15. - (P) -
Attorney GeneraldHomer fCum-
mings decided today to ask trial of
Samuel Insull and associates at Chi-
cago on the remaining Federal in-
dictment resulting from collapse of
the Insull utilities.
Insull already has won acquittals
i 1 Federaf and State courts, after his
return to this country from Europe
by Federal officers.
The remaining Federal indictment
of five counts involve the involuntary
bankruptcy of the Corporation Se-
curities Co., of Chicago, on Sept. 22,
1932, described by the Justice Depart-
menf as "top company of the Insull
group" of utilities that collapsed.
Indicted with Insull were Martin
J. Insull, Samuel Insull, Jr., Harold
L. Stuart, Philip J. McEnroe, John
F. O'Keefe, Edward J. Doyle, John H.
Gulich, Stanley Field, William R. Ir-
win and C. W. Daniels.
IA .,r 7 yf

TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 1935
VOL. XLV No. 139
Notices
Senior and Graduate Students:
Those senior and graduate students"
who have been invited to be guests1
of honor at the Twelfth Annual Hon-
crs Convocation of the University of
Michigan should order caps and
gbwns as soon as possible at the Moe
Sport ,Shop pr Van Boven, Inc. It
is necessary to place tlese orders be-
fore Saturday of this week in order1
that the caps and gowns may be deliv-
ered in time for the Convocation,3
April 26.
Jcseph A. Bursley, Chairman, Com-
mittee on Honors Convocation
Notice to all Faculty Members and
Officers: Arrangements have been
made with the purpose of having in
the General Library both for present
purposes and for future historical
value, a file of the portraits of mem-
bers of the faculty and University of-
ficials. It is highly desirable from the
Library's point of view that this file
be of portraits in uniform size. Port-
raits will be made without cost to any
faculty member or officer by Messrs.
J. F. Renschler and Son. Members
of the faculty are cordially invited
to make appontments with Rensch-
ler and Son for the purpose. Any
special questions arising with respect
to the matter may be asked either of
the secretary of the University, Mr.
Shirley W. Smith, or the Libraian,
M;. William W. Bishop.
Marsh and Mandlebaum Scholar-
ships: During the current semester
the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts will award three Mandle-
baum Scholarships and two or more
Marsh Scholarships for the year 1935-
36. Application blanks are now avail-
able in the office of the Dean of the
College, and must be returned to that
office on or before April 30. These
scholarships are restricted to stu-
dents enrolled only in the Literary
College. In making the awards,-con-
sideration will be given to the char-
acter, financial need, and scholarship
of the applicants, in the order named.
University Bureau of Appointments
& Occupational information has re-
ceived notice of the following U. S.
Civil ServiceaExaminations:
Junior Naval Architect, $2,000.
Forestry Conservationist (several
grades), $2,600 to $5,600.
Scientific Aid (several grades),
$1,260 to $1,800.
Administrative Assistant to the Di-
rector of the Census, $5,600.
Assistant Pathologist to Patholo-
gist, $2,600 to $3,800.
Chief Scientific Aid (Blister Rust
Control), $2,600.
Grazier, $3,200.
Principal Transportation Econo-
mist, $5,600.
Principal Operating and Cost An-
alyst, $5,600.
Assistant and Associated Aquatic
I Biologist, $2,600 to $3,200.
Announcements are on file at the
Bureau, 201 Mason Hall.
University Bureau of Appointments
& Occupational Information has re-
ceived notice of the following Detroit
Civil Service Examinations:
Posting Machine Operator (fe-
male), $1,560.
Calculating Machine Operator (fe-
male), $1,560.
Ambulance Operator, $1,440.
Junior and Senior Building Oper-
ator Engineer (maintenance), $2,100
to $2,580:
Junior and Senior Operating Engi-
neer (heating plant), $2,100 to $2,580.
Roller Operator.
With the exception of "Ambulance
Operator," all of the above examina-
tions are for seasonal employment
only. These examinations are open
to residents of Detroit only,
Announcements are on file at the
Bureau, 201 Mason Hall.
Notice to Vre-Forestry Students:

Word has been received froI Wash-
ington that 770 forestry students who
wish to secure experience will be en-
rolled in the Civilian Conservation
MICH IGAN
25c 35c
Matinees and Main Floor
Balc. Eves. Nights

Corp for the summer months only.
This School will be given a quota of
the above number. Unemployed sen-
iors (if any) will be selected first, then
juniors, sophomores and freshmen.
Students selected will be assigned to
camps near their homes and expenses
to and from home paid, except when
student states choice and can be sent
to distant parts of the country. In
the latter case the student will have
to report to enrollment point desig-
nated near camp and return from
there to his home at his own expense.
All pre-forestry studets interested
are urged to leave names with the
Recorder, School of Forestry and
Conservation, Room 2058 N. S. before
5 p.m., Wednesday, April 17.
r . S. T. Dana, Dean
All fraternities, sorrties, and dor-
rpitries are requested to send a repre-
entative to the Editorial Office of
the Michiganensian, in the Student
Publications Building today to check
the final copy for his respective or-
Sgaiization for the 1935 'Ensian.
Petitions for Executive Offices in.
the student organization of the Mich-
igan Union are due in the Student Of-
fices of the Michigan Union not later
than 4 o'clock Monday, April 22.
Sophomore Engineers: Class jack-
ets must be ordered before April 25
,t the Masten and Chase, 211 S. Main
c7t. Please order at once so the jack-
ets can be gotten without delay.
Contemporary: All manuscripts
submitted for the May issue must be
in the office of Contemporary, Stu-
dent Publications Building, by noon.
Saturday, April 27.
Contemporary: Manuscripts sub-
mitted to the April issue may be
called for at the office of Contempor-
ary Tuesday and Thursday after-
noons between 4 and 5:30 p.m.
Intermediate Dancing Class has
again been postponed until Tuesday,
April 23.
Archery, golf and tennis entries are
now being taken at the Intramural
Sports Building. Entries close April
29. Tournament play starts May 1.
Dance Program Rehearsals:
Tuesday -4:15, Campus Satire;
7:30, Stations and Satire.
Wednesday -3:00, Religious Cycle;
4:15, Men's Studies; 5:00, Fire Dance;
7:30, Campus Satire.
Thursday - 4:15, Dance of Greet-
ing; 5:00, Fire Dance; 7:30, Balance
- D. H. Study Rhythmic Study.
Friday -3:00, Bartoks, Peasants,
etc.; 4:00, Balance; 4:15, Men's Stud-
ies; 4:45, Stations.
Saturday - 9:30, Pavanne; 10:00
Satire; 10:30, Stations; 11:00 Campus
Satire.
Sunday -2:45, Men's Studies. All
Technical Studies; 4:15, Campus Sat-
ire; 4:45, Dance of Greeting.
Academic Notices
History 48: Hour examination,
April 16, at 10 a.m. Sections 1 and 5
in Room D, Haven; sections 2, 3 and
4 in Room C Haven.
Lecture
University Lecture:
Prof. Bronislaw Malinowski, of the
University of London, will speak on
the subject, "The Economic Motive
in the Development of Civilization,"
Tuesday, April 16, at 4:15 p.m., in
Natural Science Auditorium. The
public is cordially invited.
Public Lecture: Dale S. Cole, of De-
troit, will give a public lecture at the
Michigan League this evening at 8
o'clock, on the subject, "Wheice,
Whither, Why?" Mr. Cole, being a
trained and practicing electrical en-
gineer and a Baha'i student ,ap-
proaches his subject from both scien-
tific and religious points of view. The

STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
9x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
NOTICE
NEW AND USED CARS -- Largest
selection in the country. Associated
Motor Services, Inc. 317 W. Huron.
Ph. 2-3268. "Let's get acquainted."
lox ]
'Perversive Activities'
Banned By Ruthven'
(Continued from Page 1)
which is founded upon good charac-
ter., sound citizenship and scholarly
endeavor.
"Persons responsible for organiz-
ing or conducting meetings contrary
to this rule will be dealt with prompt-
ly and vigorously. The University has
no desire to curtail freedom of speech,
but, as a state-supported institution
devoted to education, it proposes to
continue to fulfill to the utmost its

WANTED
COOK WANTED: For children's
camp near Jackson, Mich. Man
and wife preferred. Address Avru-
nin, 4075 Tyler, Detroit, Mich. 184
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main . 7x
LOST AND FOUND
LApY'S white gold Longines watch
with black cord strap. Return to
Box 40, Mich. Daily.
DISAPPEARED: Black Persian tom
cat. Children's pet. Reward. Call
8321. 180
obligations to the state and to the
cause of genuine education.
"Students who are known to have
interfered with the proper conduct of
University affairs and with the work
of their fellows are being investigated
and necessary action will be taken
promptly.
"Students who shall be guilty of
such misconduct in the future may
expect disciplinary action."

Camp avis, Surveying Field
Station, Set To Open June 24

By RALPH W. HURD
In 1904 Prof. Clarence T. Johnston,
head of the department of geodesy
and surveying, and the late Prof. Jos-1
eph B. Davis made a long wagon tripi
through the Jackson Hole country in
Wyoming.
Twenty-four years later, largely as
a result of this wagon trip, the survey-
ing field station of the University,
Camp Davis, was moved from its lo-
cation near Douglas Lake in this state
to a site in the Hoback valley in Wy-
oming, shown in the picture above.
The Hoback valley offers an ideal
area for field study in surveying.
Mountainous landscape formations
are supplemented by a flat table-land
in the immediate vicinity of the camp
which allows the student to engage in
the routine surveying activities un-
hindered by trees or rolling land that
might otherwise obstruct the view.
The activities of the camp are pri-
marily designed to afford surveying
public is cordially invited to this lec-
ture which is sponsored by the Baha'i
study group.
University Lecture:
Dr. Lawrence J. Henderson, Profes-
sor of Biological Chemistry in Harv-
ard University, will lecture on "Par-
eto's Contribution To Methodology
in the Social Sciences" in Room B,
Haven Hall, Wednesday, April 17, at
4 p.m., under the auspices of the De-
partment of Sociology. Those inter-
ested are cordially invited to attend.
Events Today
School of Education Forum: An all-
school of education forum will be
held in the library of the University
Elementary School at 7:30 p.m. All
members of the faculties of the Uni-
versity High School, University Ele-
mentary School, and School of Edu-
cation are urged to attend.
Physics Colloquium: Nathan Gins-
burg will speak on "The Infra-red Ab-
sorption Spectrum of Methyl Deuter-
ide" at 4:15 p.m., Room 1641, East
Physics Bldg. All interested are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Mathematical Club regular meeting
at 8 p.m., Angell Hall. Professor N.
H. Anning will speak on "The Lill
Process."
Adelphi House of Representatives
meets at 7:30 p.m. There will be a
debate on the proposition: "Resolved,
That the several states should com-
pletely abolish the various forms of
parole. All members should be pres-
ent.

students a chance to make practicall
application of the courses studied at
the University. After familiarizing'
themselves with the various surveying
instruments used, the campers spend+
a major part of the eight weeks period
making topographical and United
States Land surveys.
An intensive study is made of the
region with the end in view of locat-
ing possible areas for the construc-
tion of routes of travel, tunnels,
bridges, dams, canals, and reservoirs.
( Astronomical observations are also
taken in conjunction with the survey-
ing work in order that latitude and
longitude lines may be traced through
the region.
Supplementing the regular camp
program it has been the custom of the
students to reserve one week-end for
an extended trip through the Yellow-
stone National Park. The more ambi-
tious campers occasionally attempt to
climb the Grand Teton mountain
which lies just north of the Hoback.
Few, however, have reached the top
of this mountain, since it towers
nearly 8,000 feet above the surround-
ing area.
Camp Davis will open this year on
June 24, Professor Johnson, director
of the field station, announced. Av-
erage costs for the entire period, in-
cluding transportation, tuition fees,
and side-trips, amounts to about $150,
he stated. Eight hours credit is of-
fered, and students wishing to attend
the camp must satisfy prerequisites of
seven hours introductory work in
surveying here at the University.
4:30 Tuesday or Wednesday, or Wed-
nesday evening at 7:15. The room
will be posted.
Tea for Graduate Students in
Mathematics at 4:00 p.m., 3001 An-
gell Hall.
Christian Science Organization:
There will be a meeting of this or-
ganization tonight at 8 o'clock in the
Chapel of the Women's League Build-
ing. Students, alumni, and faculty
(Continued on Page 61
1 .-.

I

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Lydia

MENDELSSOHN

Th e a t r e

1935 Dramatic Season

ROBERT HENDERSON, Director

0

Compromise On Bonus
WASHINGTON, April 15 -(P)-
While House leaders sought carefully
today to steer the social security pro-
gram away from the liberalizing
amendments,dSenate spokesmen re-
ported the Administration would ap-
prove a compromise on the bonus.
Chairman Harrison of the Senate
Finance committee announced that
he would introduce the bonus bill to-
morrow, and added that its terms
would be satisfactory to Mr. Roose-
velt. Its provisions remained undis-
closed but predictions were that it
would not go as far as the Patman
or Vinson bills for immediate cash
payment.

B

SOCIAL DANCING
Adult class every Thur.
eve, at 8 pm. Private
lessons daily, 10 to 10.
'TERRACE GARDEN
STUDIO
Wuerth Theater Bldg.
Phone 9695

Announces
A SC HEDULE CHANGE
NOW - Opening Week - May 20-25
"LA BUR NUM GROVE"
with the Original London Cast.
NOW - Second Week -
NAZIMOVA and ROMNEY BRENT in
"SIMPLETON of the UNEXPECTED
ISLES"
(Monday, May 27, Tuesday, Wednesday Matinee and
Night"
IBSEH"S "GHOSTS"
(Thursday, May 30, Friday Matinee and Night, Satur-
day Matinee and Night)
The Stars, the Plays, and the Remaining Schedule are the
same as previously announced.
SEASON TICKETS,
Now On Sale
Any SIX PLAYS for $3.00, $3.50, $4.50, or $6.00.
On Sale in the GARDEN ROOM, Michigan League.

Anti-German Feeling
Causes Danzig Riots
FREE CITY OF DANZIG, 'April 15
-(OP)-Violent demonstrations against
Nazi Germany flared over the week-
end in the Polish corridor, leaving
one Nazi dead today and many others
wounded.
Uneasiness was felt, although offi-
cials said passions which flared into
violence had cooled.
Anti-German feeling broke out
anew in the Baltic and Pomorce-Siles-
ian coal fields, while several bloody
demonstrations were reported in Up-
per Silesia where Poles allegedly
urged by officials, are up. in arms
against German minority schools. The
favorable Polish showing in the Dan-
zig directions last Sunday apparent-
ly emboldened residents of the Free
City to manhandle Germans for "at-
tempting to Germanize us."
FRATERNITY PROOFS READY
Announcement was made yesterday
by 'Ensian staff members that fra-
ternity and sorority representatives
should call at the 'Ensian office be-
tween 3 'p.m. and 6 P'm. today to
check their page proofs.

Tau Beta Pi dinner meeting
6:15, Michigan Union.

at

- ENDS TONIGHT
Joan Crawford - Clark Gable
'Forsaking All Others"
Wednesday - Thursday
FIRST-RUN FEATURE
Loretta Young
"CARfAVAN"
-Plus
Guy Kibbee - Aline McMahon
"BABBITT"

Zeta Phi Eta: Regular meeting in
the League Grill Room, at 12 noon.
Stanley Chorus: Any women inter-
ested in trying out for Stanley Chor-
us come to the League from 3:30 to

0

...i.a

DAILY 15c TO 6 P.M.
W H ITNEY
-__- NOW

BING CROSBY
W. C. FIELDS
JOAN BEN N ETT
in

25cE MAJESTIC 3c
MATINEES M J S I MAIN FLOOR
EVE. in BALCONY EVENINGS
ENDS TONIGHT
Helen Hayes - Robert Montgomery
"VA N ESSA, Her Love Story a
MUzCAL COMEDY - ECREEN VAUDEVILLE - NEW
TOMORROW - Two Hilarious First-Run Feoatures!!
An electric storin of laughs - Seven of Hollywood's Finest
Funsters in a story of murder that will split your homi-sides.
BEN LYON;
THELMA TODD'
(I PERT KELTON LAURA HOPE CREWS;
R K O \ "SKEETS" GALLAGHER
CHICK CHANDLER -\WALTER CATLETT)
Plus - Thrills - Romance - Laughs - Girls
~~TMS GOT VR Y TH IN G!
-O

$ 5,0

FOR YOUR TRUE STORIES
Your own true life story probably has
those human, dramatic elements
that can win! ... Why not write it?

IN CASH
PRIZES

LESLIE HOWARD
RAY FRANCIS

VMS I mSSIPPI

1111

"BR IT ISH
AGENT"
and
MARY ASTOR
ROGER PRYOR
BABY JANE

YOUR o wn life . . . or in the life of some-
body you know of . .. there probably is a
gripping, human interest,
true life drama or romance 47 BIG1 C
that would win one of these
First Prize ,..
big cash awards. Second Prize...
Why not write it? Tell it ThirdPrize (5 at$
Fourth Prize (10 a
simply, naturally, as though Fifth Prize (30a
you were confiding it to a 47 Cash Prizes T
close friend. There are no PRIZE STORY
rules to hamper you ... no ATTAE CLS
restrictions as to length,

-- Thursday - Double Bill -
DAMON RUNYON'S
"PRINCESS O'HARA"
JEAN PARKER
and-
"TRANSIENT LADY"

AS
.t$501
t $25
ocali
CO
E O
NAY:

though it must contain at least 2500 words.
Before commencing your story, send for
._ _ _ free copy of booklet, "Help-
H PRIZES! ful Suggestions for Writers
....$5,000.00 of True Stories." It gives a
.... 2,500.00 clear explanation of the type
10.001 5,000.00 story True Story seeks, and
10.00) 5,000.00
0.00) 7,500.00 full Contest Rules. Whether
ng $25,000.00 you're a beginner or a train-
INTEST ENDS ed writer, we want your
F BUSINESS, story ! Prize Contest ends at
close of business, May 31.
- . --::--:-- - --

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