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April 04, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Baseball Team
Leaves Today
On Road Trip
Patchin To Start First
Game Against Marshall
College Tomorrow
To PlayNine Games
Coach Fisher Is Taking
17 Men On Tour South;
Five Pitchers Go
Three automobiles carrying 17 hap-
py Michigan baseball players and the
somewhat gloomy Coach Ray Fisher
will leave here at 1 p.m. this after-
noon, started on the first leg of a
nine-game road series which takes in
college nines in Ohio, West Virginia,
Maryland, and North Carolina.
'Fisher will drive one car, Capt.
Russ Oliver another, and Art Patchin
will pilot the third. A trailer will be
used to carry luggage.
Present plans are to arrive in Hunt-
ington, West Va., early Friday after-
noon, after spending the night at
some hotel on the way. The boys
will have a few hours to get the kinks
out of their legs before opening the
baseball season, with Marshall Col-
lege.
Patchin To Start
Art Patchin, lone veteran hurler,
who has been named to hurl the open-
er for the Wolverines, is in good con-
dition and will work at least six in-
nings if all goes well. He will be fol-
lowed by either John (Lefty) Gee,
sophomore pitching giant, or George
Butler, another sophomore, with a
chance that Oliver will give the Mar-
shall batters a look at his curve ball.
Although this year's club has had
an unprecedented numhber of out-
door workouts prior to the opening
game of the spring training trip,
Fisher is dissatisfied with the progress
made in the hitting and pitching de-
partments thus far. While the field-
ing has been good, cold weather has
handicapped the hitters, and the
hurlers have not had a suitably warm
day in which they could really "let
loose" for any length of time.
Batting Order Given
Fisher yesterday announced a bat-
ting order which has George Ford,
third, leading off, followed by Joe
Lerner, right field, George Rudness,
center field, Clayt Paulson, second,
Oliver, first, John Regeczi, left field,
Kim Williams, catcher, Jack Teitel-
baum, shortstop, and Patchin, pitch-
er.
After meeting Marshall College,
the Wolverines move on to Salem, Va.,

-Aw-

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4

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F'

STARCARSTENS

DEAR ART:f
I may be a menber of the "much-ridiculed" sex - but I do know some-
thing about baseball and am greatly interested in the game. I wonder if it1
would be possible for you to run some sort of a contest through your columni
inviting Michigan students to send in their guesses on the major league
races?
Just in case you are interested here are my selections:
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York Detroit
St. Louis New York
Pittsburgh Boston
Chicago Cleveland -
Boston . St. Louis
Brooklyn Washington
Cincinnati Philadelphia
Philadelphia Chicago
Bartel should make A world of difference with the Giants. The Cards
will find that even the great Deans cannot keep up with Hubbell, Schumacher,
Fitzsimmons, and Parmalee. The Cubs will be a disappointment. Charlie.
Grimm (the poorest excuse for a manager in either league) will discover
that you can't trade three first-string pitchers and still have a first-string
ball club.
Barring serious injuries, Detroit should repeat. Greenberg should have
a great year. Hogsett may be a starting pitcher. He displayed real form
in the World Series and will provide the Tiges with an effective lefty, along
with the two rookies -- Hatter and Sullivan.
Boston is a doubtful team with the effectiveness of Grove, Pipgras, Fer-
rell and Walberg determirning their position. N.Y. will threaten but will
not win. Cleveland is still the "Best Team on Paper" but still won't win the
pennant.
What do you think, Art?
"DOROTHY FAN"
Dear Dorothy Fan:
I think that I should like to invite you to attend the opener with me
in Detroit, April 16, that is, if you really are a girl, which I am inclined to
doubt. None of my beagle-nosed assistants could detect the faintest odor
of perfume or powder on your dainty epistle, and that is generally a pretty-
good test.
I agree with you, Dot, in general, but think: 1. That St. Louis will again
win the National League pennant. 2. That Cleveland wil finish higher than
fourth, probably in second, with the Yanks third.
If you will call me at the office this afternoon or evening we may be able
to get together on that April 16 date.

Here Is Proof That
Athletes A re Not
So Dumb After All'
The award this week of the Con-
ference medal for scholarship and
athletics to Harvey Smith, captain of
Michigan's track team, recalls the
fallacy of the old saw that "all ath-
letes are dumb."
The Conference Medal is one of two
awards given annually to Michigan
men for combining proficiency in ath-
letics and scholarship.
The other award is the scholarship
of $100 awarded annually by thef
Board in Control of Physical Educa-
tion to the Varsity letter winner with
the highest scholastic standing.
The scholarship last year was won1
by Bill Boice, Varsity swimmer, who
at the present time has a standing of
348 honor points for 121 hours of com-
bined work in the Engineering and
Literary Colleges.Nelson Droullard, a
reserve award winner in track, has
even bettered Boice's record, however,
with an honor point index of 3.66 for
74 hours in the Engineering College.
Among the senior athletes with
exceptional averages are Rod Howell,
cross-country and track star, who has
made 243 points with 112 hours; Sey-
mour Rubin, wrestler, with 298 honor
points for 112 hours; Cal Markham,
golf captain, who has made 236 points
with 104 hours; and Tage Jacobson,
with 226 points from 123 hours of
work, the points being given as 3 for
A

Tankinen Face Biggest
Test Of Season Today
NEW YORK, April 3.--(Spe-
ciaD -Michigan's intercollegiate
swimming champions face their
most strenuous test of the year to-
morrow as they start on a three-
day trail to the National A.A.U.
crown in the New York A.C. pool.
For the first time this season
Coach Matt Mann's Wolverines are
not heavy favorites to come out
victorious; it is thought that indi-
vidual stars will cut into the
Michigan score to such an extent
that the New York A.C. will win
the team title.
Jack Kasley, the Wolverine re-
lay teams, and Co-Captain Tay-
lor Drysdale are the only possi-
bilities for Michigan victories.
Jack Medica, the Spence broth-
ers, Matt Chortowski, and Dick
Degener head the parade of indi-
vidual stars who will compete.
ner of the Conference Medal, has
made '228 points with 133 hours.
Harvey Patton, junior track star.
has an average of approximately 2.7
per hour of credit.
Among the sophomore athletes who
have made outstanding scholastic
records is John Gee, basketball letter
winder and baseball pitcher, who has
made better than a B average with 93
honor points f or 45 hours of work.
Recent winners of the Conference
Medal have included Jim Cristy, last
year's swimming captain, Ivan Wil-
liamson, football captain in 1932, Ed

A,

- Russell; 1932 track captain, and Perry
Harvey Smith, recently named win- Austin, track distance ace, in 1931.

P

STAR DUST.
for a game with Roanoke College,
Saturday. Berger Larson is slated
to start on the mound for this game.
Other contests scheduled with the
University of North Carolina, April
8; Duke University, April 9; Univer-
sity of Virginia, April 10; University
of Maryland, April 11 and 12; Navy, F WEIRNITY
April 13, and Oberlin College, April EWELRY
15.

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______________________________________________________________11

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