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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 02, 1935 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __T H E . i XI C IJN JL Y TU ESDAY, APR

IL 2, 1935

THE MICH1GAN DAILY

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Lf1 *. f tig fR > .- Jw'1 I
d very morning except Monday during the
Univerityv year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
~r~rl of Student Publications.
Memb-r of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
3 Od ttd 'ofte ie, N CZ
M1AWH w 1SCONISIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PtESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited toit or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.:
Representatives: National:Advertising Servic'e, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y.--400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.

established here at the urgent request of the va-
rious organized medical groups of the state. The
plan was described by Dr. James D. Bruce, director
of the division, in writing for a reeent issie of "The
I American Scholar," as a program of study de-
csigned to maintain the medical practitioner at a
certain standard of -fitness.-for service-during his
professional years.
A need for the wide-spread establishment of such
a system is readily seen. Any doctor, in order to
be a competent practitioner, must, of course, keep
himself abreast of the newest methods of diagnosis
and treatment. Frequent advances in medical
science over a period of years are more than likely
to leave an old-fashioned, small-town family doctor
sadly lacking in knowledge of techniques. In this
profession, more than in any other, it is absolutely
imperative that the practitioner receive postgrad-
uate training.
The many benefits already accruing from the
work of this department warrant its continuedw
existence here. Not only that, its unqualified suc-
cess would seem to indicate definitely that a similar
program in other parts of the country is desirable.
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. AnonymoQus contributions will be 4isregrded.
The names of co i cnts Will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief. the edtorp reserving the right to condeus9
all letters of over 300 wordcs.
An AP6logy
The Daily wishes to correct an injustice done
the Campus Travel Bureau and Bert Askwith in
the form of 'a Soap Box letter appearing in
Sunday's Daily. All of the facts alleged in this
letter were investigated and none was found to
be substantiated. While there were apparently
a few delays in the service the reliability of Mr.
AskWith and the bureau were found to be un-
questioned.
Elementary Sum
To the Editor:

dowvntowin to

COLLEGIATE
OIBSERVER

If

In

COLLEGIATE
SHOE SECTfON

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR ....... ............JOHN HEALEY
EITORIAL DIRECTOR..........RALPH G.COULTR
SPORTS EDITOR ..................ARTHUR ARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................. EiANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty,
Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas I. Kleene Devid G. Mac-
donald, John M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy' ies,
Florence Harper, 'leanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown, Clinton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
.G. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard Weissman. George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
wond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
Dorothy Briscoe, Florence Davies, Helen Diefendorf,
Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith. Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin,
Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Aueger. Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad. Jewel 'Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ................RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER ..........ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department. Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Caneron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, W1111am
Barndt, Ted Wohgemuith, Lyman ittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, omer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF: Betty Cavender, Margaret
Cowie, Bernadine Field, Betty Greve, Mary Lou Hooker,
Helen Shapland, Betty Simonds, Marjorie Langenderfer,
Grace Snyder, Betty Woodworth, betsy Baxter, Margaret
Bentley, Anne Cox, Jane Evans, Ruth Field, Jean Guion,
Mildred Haas, Ruth Lipkint, Mary McCord, Jane Wil-
loughby.
NIGHT EDITOR: THOMAS E. GROEHN
Extension Of
Radio Service...
HE MORRIS HALL radio studio
closed its broadcasting season Fri-
day. The University in a recent report valued the
free educational advantages furnished to adults
and children in the state by the campus studios
this year at $935,338, as against a total operating
cost of $4,000.
The fact that the year's programs have gained
great acclaim and popularity can be observed
from the figures released by Station WJR over
whose facilities the campus programs have been
broadcast.
Whereas there were only 600,000 listeners to
these programs last year, there were close to a mil-
lion in radio audiences of the University programs
this year. This definitely points to the fact that
the broadcasting service, under the direction of
Prof. Waldo Abbot, has gained more popularity
with the people of the state. Appreciation for the
programs this year is voiced in the thousands of
letters of acclaim and interest received by the
studios.
That Station WJR appreciates having the Uni-
versity of Michigan on its schedule, is evidenced
by the fact that WJR affords broadcasting time
and much of the equipment free. They provide
times in the afternoon and evening which they
could otherwise use for commercial purposes. This
shows that they consider the University series a
worthwhile service.
It is indeed regrettable that such a valuable ac-
bivity as the campus broadcasting service must
close at such an early date as April 1 because of
he limited budget afforded to it. It is to be
hoped that next year the service will be allotted
a large enough budget to allow it to operate the
full school yeatr.
Undoubtedly the people of the state are as much
nterested in the educational information that
they receive from the faculty of the University in
the talks over Station WJR in the spring months
as they are during the fall and winter months.
Possibly it is difficult to induce members of the
faculty to prepare talks for broadcasting when the
vern'al urge of spring is calling them outdoors. But
to close so early a service which has provided for
the state close to a million dollars in educational
values, because the University cannot afford or
will not invest enough to keep it running for at
.east a month longer, seems a crime against those

who benefit so greatly from the broadcasts.
Postgraduate

By BUD BERNARD
We recently heard a stcry about a very cc zky
lad from Iowa State. When he graduated, by
scme ill chancA of fate, he landed a job with
the New York Times. Of course this made him
all the more cocky. In due time, he began to
bcthcm all the men around the office. Finally,
cne day the editor sent hits to get a statement
from Irwin S. Cobb.
Brsting into the privacy of Mr. Cobb's of-
fice, he began with his customary ego: "Mr.
Ccbb, I'm Hicks from Iowa State. I've accept-
ed a position with the Times and thought I'd
drop over and see if you had a statement for
the press."
The humorist was in a bad mood, so he
growled back: "Do you know what we do with
hicks in New York?"
"Mr. Cobb," replied the conceited lad, "I
don't give a hang what you do with Hicks in
New York, but I do know what we do with
Cobbs in Iowa."
The Indiana State Legislature is considering a
proposal to insure against injury or disablement of
all football and basketball players participating in
regularly scheduled games of Indiana schools, col-
leges and athletic associations. According to the
advocates of the proposal, this would be a very wise
move as all too many students are forced into
athletic competition because of their superior abil-
ities, and are unable to pay for any subsequent
resulting doctor bills which may be occasioned by
any unforseen accidents. Certainly the frequency
of accidents in modern sports has not become so
great that insurance companies should not show
a sizeable profit on any such insurance they claim,
and certainly the innumerable students who meet
with serious injuries each year would be greatly
assisted by such aid.
Here is a humorous story coming from the
University of Texas. A young man, at that
institution, got an "A" for the first time
in his mental career and immediately wired
his folks to tell them about it.
To be sprightly, he added humorously that
he had suffered a nervous breakdown as a re-
sult. Four hours later a dust-covered car
skidded up to his fraternity house door and
out stumbled his parents.
The lad's "stopless" telegram had read, "Off-
spring Gets A Nervous Breakdown May Re-
cover.
College editors already know, at least most of
them, how closely President Roosevelt is guarded
by the secret service. A group of them were
waiting in an anteroom to see the President. The
door opened and they began to file inside. One
editor said good-naturedly to another: "Come on,
comrade." The word "comrade" was enough - the
lads were immediately grabbed by huskies and
thoroughly searched.
A junk man recently rapped on the door of
the Delta Gam sorority at the University of
Illinois and asked the young co-eds who an-
swered the door whether they had any beer
bottles to sell.
"Do, we look like we drink beer?" was the
retort.
"Pardon me lady," said the solicitor, "do you
have any vinegar bottles?"
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Se6ood from out

Mind
cture of
Shoes
to These,

If two and two make four then Alexander G.
Ruthven is either a member of the National Stu-
dent League or on its payroll, or the League has
been secretly hired by the President to further
his efforts in effectuating legislative appropriations
favorable to the University. If this isn't so then
we are forced to the conclusion that "A Michigan
Man" . . . who wrote in The Daily for March 19
has "in order to gain a modicum of odious pub-
licity" cut his own throat, betrayed the students,
the faculty and the University itself, to use the
very words he slung against the National Student
League.
How did this mess come about? "A.M.M." wrote
that "there is a determined movement in the
State Legislature to abolish the educational mill
taxes and force educational institutions to be
dependent on direct appropriations from the gen-
eral fund," that the "mill tax is the lifeblood
of this university" and that "the National Student
League has engendered the Legislature's action,"
thus cutting the throat of everybody concerned.
The Daily for Friday' crashed through with a news
item right into "A Michigan Man's" bread basket.
It stated that ::The Reed Bill, which was intro-
duced into the Legislature Feb. 18, proposes that
the income of the University shall be taken from
the general fund," that this bill is "also sponsored
by President Alexander G. Ruthven," that "Pres-
ident Ruthven indicated he was in favor of the
substitution of the general fund for the state prop-
erty tax as the source of the University's in-
come ..."
Now what's to become of "A Michigan Man"?
It must be taken for granted that President Ruth-
ven knows what's good for our University; the
N.S.L. seems to be "just like that" with the Presi-
dent on this question. Knowing President Ruth-
ven's political complexion, we must conclude that
he and the N.S.L. are a bunch of conservatives;
which places "A Michigan Man" on the other side
of the fence . . . .
--A True Michigan Man.

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MAIN FLOOR III

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DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS ARE EFFECTIVE

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A Washington
YSTAN DER

NOTICE

Talk vs. Action

To the Editor:

Viewing the international scene, one finds a
situation strikingly similar to that of 1917. Today,
as in the fatal year we find ourselves spending
many minutes talking, screaming, convinced that
war must not reoccur and that it is inhumane,
horrible, wasteful, unnecessary, etc.
Those conscientious war-haters who have taken
the trouble to look back a few years will no doubt
observe that there were probably as many paci-
fistic organizations as there are today. People
rated war as much as they profess to today, and
they wasted their time just as they are wasting
it now. Talking has been tried before; screaming
has been tried before. What good did it do? Per-
haps a few more souls heeded their cries and chose
the cell for the shell hole, but many, ma' more
went to the front reluctantly.
April fourth represents, if nothing else, the op-
portunity for the great mass of college students
to stop talking for an hour and to act on their
convictions. For one hour they can drop the
pen and take up the banner of peace if they so
desire. But university administrations shy from
the word "strike." "Strike" smacks of Toledo,
California and labor. They would have the stu-
dents listen to a man (most likely of above the
draft age) complimenting them on their fine spirit,
their pressed pants and their clean sports. The
phrases will be trite and the listeners bored. The
germ of inaction will be subtly injected Into their,
skins.
During the last massacre a man dressed in any-
thing but brown was a slacker. He was yellow,
afraid if he hesitated to donate a body to the

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, April 2.
SEN. CARTER GLASS who filled, with an "amia-
bility" surprising to himself, the difficult role
of Senate manager for a bill he hoped would be
licked, seems to have learned
something by that experience.
He is on record with a pro-
posal to choke off delaying de-
bate by a change in Senate
rules. Veteran that he is of both
House and Senate, he probably
does not really expect to get
anywhere with that. It is just
a gesture. But the Virginian
promptly repeated on the par-
I amentary business by which he
wound up the seven-week dis-
cussion in the Senate of the
TUER P$ work-relief resolution.
The very next bill taken up
was an appropriation measure, also under Glass'
management as appropriations chairman. It was
the treasury-post office supply bill, filled with dy-
namite. Yet Glass got it through the Senate and
to conference in jig time.
** * *
ONE OF THOSE was a $2,000,000 boost by kc-
Adoo of California in funds made available
for air mail extensions. As the bill stands, the
Senate approves putting that much additional into
the transpacific airmail route development. But
Glass accepted it only to get it to conference.
There was a time when Carter Glass would have
stood up and fought even the appearance of ac-
cepting the proposals he does not approve. That
he intends to do battle as relentlessly as ever
against those he dislikes but through the easier
parliamentary mechanism of the conference re-
port, goes without saying.
SEN. GEORGE NORRIS based his idea of sub-
stituting a "unicameral" legislature out in

I

THE PRICES of Season Tickets (six concerts)
have been reduced $1.00 each, to new low
levels of $2.00, $3.00, and $4.00 for holders
of "Festival" Coupons (an average of from
33c to 67c per concert), and $5.00, $6.00,
and $7.00 for others.
Orders filed and filled in sequence.

-_ ARTISTS
MARY MOORE . . . . . . . . Soprano
HELEN JEPSON . . . . . Soprano
MYRTLE LEONARD . . . Contralto
RUTH POSSELT . . . . . . . Violinist
WILBUR EVANS . Baritone
MAXIM PANTELEIFF . . . ..Baritone
GIOVANNI MARTINELLi . . . Tenor

GROUPS
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

EARL V. MOORE
MsicEal Director

THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

OSEF LHEVINNE

Pianist

FREDERICK STOCK
ERIC DELAMARTAR

PAUL ALTHOUSE . . . . . . . Tenor

ETHYL HAYDEN
THEODORE WEBB ..
PAUL LEYSSAC
MABEL ROSS RHEAD
E. WILLIAM DOTY. . .

....Soprano
. Baritone
Narrator
Pianist
Organist

Conductors

YOUNG PEOPLE'S
CHORUS
JUVA HIGBEE,

_ ,

WORKS
BORIS GODUNOF in English

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