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March 31, 1935 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
No Matter Where Or How-A Travel Service Will Arrange It For

SUNDlAY, M~ARCH1 31, 1935
lYou

Many Festivals To
Be Offered During
European Season

Dr. Baxter Shoots European
eauty Spots 'ith Cameras

Boatmen In Sngapore

By LLOYD S. REICH

(Continued From Page 9)I
Field of Blackbirds"'; Switzerland will
offer the Grand Prix of auto racing,
the fencing championship of Europe,
and the Bach Festival .at Zurich;
Corpus Christi Day and St. John's
Eve will be celebrated throughout the
continent.
In July: Germany will start her;
Wagner-Mozart Festivals at Munich
and will hold a world reunion of Heid-
elbergers at that town: France will
celebrate Bastile Day; England will
sponsor the Davis Cup Tennis Match-
es at Wimbledon; the Swedish moun-
tain-climbing season will begin; the
Scotish Amateur Gold Championships
will be held at St. Andrew's; music
and dramatic festivals will be held in
many European countries, and the
yachting season will be in full swing
in the North and Baltic Seas.
In August: Holland will celebrate
birthdays of the Queen and the
Queen Mother; Russia will hold the
International Physiological Congress
at Leningrad 'and Moscow; Scotch
Grouse shooting will begin; sheep dog
trials will be held in England and in
Wales; and motoring, swimming, ten-
nis, and other sport events will be
held on the continent.

L

THE YEAR OF YEAR V
R 'gTB tN
Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of
the succession of His Majesty King
George V to throne of British Empire.
POMP, PAGEANTRY, BRILLIANT
CELEBRATIONS...ALL ENGLAND
IN JOYFUL, CARNIVAL MOOD
See the colorful Royal Procession. At-
tend the Thanksgiving service in St.
Paul's Cathedral. Thrill to .the Navy,
Army and Air Force Maneuvers at
Olympia . . . to the medieval tourna-
ments... the spectacular fireworks dis-
plays... the traditional and immensely
impressive pageantry. Days teemin g
with unforgettable .Jubilee events.

Armed with a triumvirate of cam-
eras, Prof. Dow V. Baxter of the c
School of Forestry and Conservations
last summer shot his way throughI
France, England, Scotland, Denmark,
Holland, Germany, Sweden, Norway,t
Finland, and Russia. .
Of all the countries that he visited,N
Professor Baxter finds Sweden the
most intriguing. "The people are coun-
teous," he stated as he thought over
the adventures he had had amongc
the Swedes. "They even took me into
their society . . . Why, they even let1
me be one of the Swedes."
As far as beauuy is concerned, Pro-
fessor Baxter said that there is prob-1
ably no more beautiful section any-
where than the waterway from Stock-
holm through the Archipelago to Hel-
singfors. "Here and there through-j
out the whole passage one passesf
small rocky, spruce and pine-covered#
islets looming up out of the clear,1
greenish water."
Liked Swedish Scenery
Professor Baxter said that he hadE
no difficulty in making himself un-
derstood by the Swedish inhabitants,
because they all knew some English,r
and put up with his mistakes as he'
first tried to learn their language.
Russia, also, held enchantment for
him. Professor Baxter said that he
went there not to learn of the po-
litical, economical, and social life of
the new order of Russian government,
as most Americans and English do,
but because he wanted to learn of
the research carried on in the in-
tellectual institutes. Surprised to find
a foreigner interested in that rather
than their unique government, the
Russians, according to Professor Bax-
ter, "fell all over him trying to help
him to learn of the intellectual de-
velopment and to carry it back home
with him."
Had Brush With Nazis
In Germany Professor Baxter had
a rather unusual experience. While he
was in Berlin, a parade of brownshirts
was marching down the main street.
Lining the sides of the streets were
crowds shouting "Heil, Hitler!" and
holding their right hands skyward.
Unaccustomed to such a procedure,
Professor Baxter did not follow the
regulations of shouting and raising
his arm. An officer in the parade,
seeing a non-conformist among the
spectators paced over to Professor
Baxter and roughly persuaded him to
"Heil, Hitler" and lift his arm.
Unable to resist the call of Sweden,
aster Tour
$59 ;"eas"
All Expense
Atlantic City - Washington
New York - Philadelphia
THE PAUL HENRY TOURS
234 State. cadilae 7076
- -__________

Professor Baxter returned to the land'
which he terms "the land of romance,
courtesy, and friendliness." He spent
six months in study in this country
and Holland. His study consisted in
visiting the principal forest labora-
tories, learning new facts every day,
and compiling them to use in his
work at the University. There he sat
at the same dinner table as the direc-
tor of the largest pulp and paper mill
in the world, and together they dis-
cussed forest problems.
Amerifan Trees in Scotland
Another feature of the trip that
stands out in Professor Baxter's mind
is the trip to the small area of
Peebles, Scotland. There he saw
American trees growing in the same
manner as they do in this country.
The country bordering Norway, too,
reminded him of America. This sec-
tion, he said, is an exact replica of
the "Medicine Bow" in Wyoming,
having expansive arid dense lodge-
pole forests.
Only one mishap happened on the
entire trip, he pointed out. On the
way to Europe, aboard the S.S. Ber-
engaria, the ship encountered a storm.
This, according to Professor Baxter,
was no ordinary storm, for during
the period of raging waves several
aboard the Berengaria were injured
by being thrown against walls of
cabins, and this storm even made
headlines in various German, French,
and English newspapers.
"There is nothing more fascinating
than a good storm at sea," says Pro-
fessor Baxter.
Eleven Of Faculty
To Travel Europe
(Continued From Page 9)
will leave in June to spend a semester
in Germany. Dr. and Mrs. Harley
Haines, Jr., will also leave for Eu-
rope in June. Dr. Haines will spend
a year of study abroad.
Prof. Robert B. Hall of the geog-
raphy department will -take a group
of students to Japan this summer
for study in which University credit
will be offered. Prof. Carleton B.
Jceckel of the library science depart-
ment will spend a summer of study
in Sweden, Norway, England, and
France.
Prof. and Mrs. Sanford B. Meech
of the English department will go to
England this summer where Profes-
sor Meech will carry on research work.
Miss Hilda V. Burr, instructor in
physical education for women, will re-
turn to her home in England for the
summer.
PEPYS' CHURCH A CHAPEL
The small twelfth-century crypt'
of St. Olave's, Hart Street, the Lon-
don church in which Pepys wor-
shipped and where he and his wife
were buried, has been restored for
use as a chapel.

-Courtesy The Detroit News.
This picture shows the native boat-
men in their boats along the wharf
of the Shanghai waterfront.
Pound's Value
Makes Travel
CheapIn Isles
(Continued From Page 9)
VIII as fortifications, St. Mawes and
Pendennis, and to the Mount St.
Michael, a castle built on an island off
the Cornwall coast.
Many Immortalized Spots
Mountain scenery, Professor Cross
said, abounds in the Lake Country
and in the Highlands of Scotland and
Wales. The chalk cliffs on the north
coast of Devon are peculiar for their
red color and those in Cornwell for
their grey shade.
The River Wye and Tintern Abbey,
both immortalized by. Wordsworth,
are delightful in their beauty, Pro-
fessor Cross advised, as he told of
the effort made by the Forest Dean
along the left bank of the Wye.
Fountain Abbey, in the opinion of
Professor Cross, is one of the most
beautiful places in the world. It is
an ancient ruin, situated by the side
of a stream in the midst of green,,
fertile fields.
'Olde Englande' Seen
Many tiny villages throughout Eng-
land are quaint, he continuel. Es-
pecially he called attention to Bibury,
near Oxford and Cockington, in Dev-
onshii,e near the resort of Torquay.
In one spot in particular there is
a reminiscence of "Olde Englande."
It is in the Devonshire Lorna Doone
country, where from Lynton there still
runs an old-fashioned stage coach,
with red-coated footmen and all. It
isin this section that the Duke of
Devonshire has his 186,000 acres, with
its mid-victorian castles.

Special Tours
Aid Travelers
On Excursion
In All Fields Tourists Find
Agencies To Help Them
Find Accommodations
For prospective travelers who de-
sire to avoid the worry and hurly-
burly of choosing and making train
and steamship connections, of making
hotel reservations, And bothering with
exchange rates, there are a wide se-
lection of conducted tours which re-
quire as little as $200 and which ex-
tend for periods of four weeks or
longer.
The extent of the tours is of the
broadest. Europe is divided and sub-
divided into itineraries so that the
most particular or impecunious trav-
eler may find one to suit him. Tours
are conducted to the Levant, to Egypt,
to South American countries, to Mex-
ico, to the Far East, and even into
the interior of Africa.
And they are not all merely sight-
seeing tours either. Included among
them are: travel courses in prehistory,
with most of the sight-seeing in mu-
seums; lecture tours in which college
credit may or may not be allowed;
pilgrimages in honor of Biblical or
historical characters; and regular
summer sessions in foreign schools.
Soviet Courses Offered
Among the interesting sumier
courses which can be taken in con-
nection with a tour is one in Soviet
cultural subjects, sponsored by that
government and given in English at
Moscow. The Intourist tours handle
this course in Ann Arbor through the
Michigan Alumni Travel Bureau,
managed by Frederick S. Randall,
'23, which also maintains a compre-
hensive foreign and domestic travel
service and which is agent for many
travel tour services.
In addition Mr. Randall is spon-
soring and is director of the All-
American Undergraduate Tour which
is being sold throughout the country
by the American Express Company.
The tour covers most of the Eastern
European countries.
Another tour, seven weeks in ex-
cent, is offered by the Hamburg Amer-
ican Line and is organized especi-
ally for Ann Arbor students by Jules
Haltenberger, '36E, through the
Eugene G. Kuebler agency.
Promotes -German Tour
This tour gives a full five weeks in
Germany during which time the
members are guests of the German
government, thus making possible
the low price of the trip. Individual
excursions and extensions on the
five weeks in Germany, such as an
additional week in Paris or London,
may also be secured for a small in-
crease in price.
The Leidich Travel Bureau, in De-
troit, sponsors a nove form of tour
in which the members are not under
the personal conduct'ion of a :pro-
fessional leader but instead have
their itineraries arranged for them
in advance, with tickets, hotel prices,
and lists of important places to visit
furnished in advance.

PER
DAY

AND UP ACCORDING TO CLASS
OF TRAVEL. OTHER TOURS OF
VARYING DURATION AND PRICES

u

This exceptionally low rate includes all
expenses. It is made possible by Cunard
White Star's Round--Trip 'Excursion
Rate which is only % over the regular
one-way fare. This rate expires April
30. ., and the April 27 sailing of the
Aquitania is your last Cunard White
Star opportunity to enjoy this low rate.
You return in the Britannic May 1$8,
arriving New York May 26.
The All-Expense Tour, in addition to
London, includes the Shakespeare
Country, the Sunny South, Devon,
Bournemouth, Torquay, Penzance,
Land's EndBath, New Forest, Ascot.
Inquire about Cunard White Star's De-
ferred Payment Plan. Down payment
of only 25%. Send for folder listing
many other All-Expense Cunard
White Star Jubilee Tours.

11

Use the
"Longest Gangplank in te World"
for your trip to Europe, and enjoy
the comfort, beauty and excellence
of cuisine offered by the modern
vessels of the FRENCH LINE.
WEEKLY SERVICE BETWEEN NEW YORK-
PLYMOUTH-I-IAVRE
For Further Particulars Write to
FRENCH LINE, 1247 Washington Boulevard, Detroit
or consult your local travel agent.
l-i

WE ARE YOUR
LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT$
The great steamship lines direct you to "your
local travel agents" for expert advice.
We represent all these lines. We are your local
travel agents.
Consult us without cost, without obligation.
THE MICHIGAN ALUMNI TRAVEL BUREAU
ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL
FREDERICK S. RANDALL, Manager

OM-00M.-

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,

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