100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1

six THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH Z1, I
m I

Wise Selection
Of Vocation Is
Plea Of Myers
Encourages Students Who
Are Not Sure Of Work
In RadioSpeech
Vacillating students were given ad-
vice and encouragerment by Prof.
George E. Myers of the vocational
education and guidance department
yesterday in a radio talk over Sta-
tion WJR, broadcast direct from the
campus studios in Morris Hall.
"A wise choice of a vocation," Pro-
fessor Myers asserted, "is more im-
portant than an early choice." He
also pointed out that the student
who has not chosen his vocation "will
find plenty of company, and good
company too, among the freshmen of
any college he may choose to attend."
Cites Factors
Professor Myers cited native cap-
acity, genuine desire for further edu-
cation, ability to finance or work one's
way throu'gh college, and the respon-
sibility for support of the family as
the determining factors in the choice
of the life work.
"It is well to keep in mind," he
warned, "that in making and chang-
ing choices of vocations final respon-
sibility must rest with the individual
who is most directly concerned. He
cannot safely shift the decision to
anyone else. Young people who ac-
cept without question occupational
choices made for them by parents,
teachers, or friends, often find later
that they have made a serious mis-
take."
Explains Phases of Problem
Professor Myers emphasized the
fact that the problem faced by the
individual who is trying to make a
wise vocational choice consists of
comparing his traits and character-
istics, his personal assets and liabili-
ties, with the requirements and op-
portunities of different occupations
until he becomes reasonably sure that
he has found one which harmonizes
with what he can put into it. .
"Neither the happy-go-lucky stu-
dent intent only on having a good
time while in college nor the 'grind,'
intent only on making the highest,
grades," he said, "will find out very
much about his own personal assets
and liabilities. Only the thoughtful
student who is willing to give time
and serious attention to study of
himself as revealed by all the expe-
riences of college life will make much
progress towards the goal of self-
knowledge in selecting a vocation."

TH E STAGE*

Association To
Hold Meeting
Here Saturday

_._

I Deceivyes ]Vomn tior

AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THE JUNIOR GIRLS PLAY
"TUNE IN ON LOVE"
By ELEANOR BLUM
Who was it that said that in crit-
ic ism it was necessary to be both fru-
gal and truthful, an impossible com-
bination. "Tune in on Love" is a good
Junior Girls Play. Carried away by
the enthusiasm of the senior-open-,
ing night, the juniors worked from
a rather drab beginning to a peppy
climax.
Alison Tennant as leading man was
extremely good, making up for her
sketchy singing by her acting and
her ability to "appear the man."
Claire Gorman should also be com-
plimented.
The singing, it must be admitted,
was not good, and many of the lead-
songs were traceable to popular song
hits. Of them all, though, "Candy"
and the final hit of the show, "It
Takes a Long Time to Learn a Little
of Love" were both catchy tunes.
For the bit parts, Florence Chaikin,
as the justice of the peace stands
out above them all. She had more
ease, pep and enthusiasm than even
the leads.
Jean Fleckenstine as Horase Tim-
kins, played a difficult part well. Give
the juniors credit for having a plot
entirely different from preceding
years. Deserting the usual college plot,
the author centered her theme on an
advertising scheme to promote Tim-
kens products by a nation-wide love
contest.
The scenes were cleverly staged and
nicely set and the black-outs used for
the domestic scenes clever.
The trio, the announcers, and the
Charity Ball singer all did a nice
piece of work. Not a professional
piece of work, but who would want
it to be? What it most needs is "lift."
Denies Charge Of
Serving Raw Milk
Alva C. Walker, proprietor of the
boarding house at 611 Church St.,
pleaded not guilty yesterday in Jus-
tice Jay H. Payne's court to a charge
of bringing in and serving ungraded,
dirty, raw milk, and keeping and
serving it in an unsanitary method.
Walker's boarding house serves
more than 100 students, and his farm
was inspected Tuesday by Harold
Barnum, city milk inspector. Mr.
Barnum swore out the warrant yes-
terday following his inspection.

"TUNE IN ON LOVE"
A Review Dr. Blakeman Announces
SBy C. BRADFORD CARPENTER
Orchids to everyone from Miss JulieIComplete Program For
Kane down to the lowliest committee Group Meeting
members for having organized so well
a Junior Girls Play. "Tune in on The program for the convention of
Love," the story of a penniless young the Religious Education Association
couple who enter and win a love con- of the United States and Canada,
test sponsored by Timkin Caterers, Which will be held Saturday at the
Inc., and are featured on the air in Unicn, was announced yesterday by
their love nest every day from nineI Dr. E. W. Blakeman, counselor in re-
a.m. to five p.m. for a year, lends it- ligious education.
self beautifully to musical comedy, I The program will begin with a
and with the wealth of music and va-I luncheon at 12:30. At that timie Dr.
riety of scenes it possesses affords an Joseph M. Artman, executive secre-
evening of Junior Girl entertainment tary. of the Association, will speak on
that surpasses many of its prede- "The Function Of Religion." There
cessors in smoothness, charm, and will be discussions by the Rev. Ed-
completeness. ward Ramsdell, Ph.D., Ypsilanti,
"Tune in on Love" does not sparkle, Prof. Leroy Waterman of the oriental
from beginning to end; nor does it I languages department and others. At
have the alacrity that characterizes 3 p.m. Dr. Mary C. Van Tuyl, of the
afirst rate rfesioal musicalrioms psychology department will discuss
a fis ae professiona musical comn- "pycology departe nth will disus
edy. But when it gets into motion, it,"Problems Of Belief O the Part of
succeeds in holding one's interest and 700 University Students."
in presenting in a decidedly worth- There will be either committee busi-
while way the feminine talent of the ness or discussion groups at 4:30 p.m.,
class of '36. followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. Res-
The musical score and. accompany- ervations for the dinner must be
ing lyrics command attention, and made by phone or card. Dr. Ken-
are due all sorts of praise for their neth A. Heaton, of the state depart-
originality, continuity, and good ex- ment of public instruction, Prof.
ecution. But the dances are not as Lowell J. Carr of the -sociology de-
good, appearing crowded and lacking partment, Dr. Rabbi Bernard Heller,
originality. J. M. Artman, Superintendent E. H.
ntecast, Florence Chaikin car- Chapelle, Ypsilanti, and Superintend-
ries off the honors with a delightful tN. J. Quicksteadd, Royal Oak, and
voice and plenty of pep. The femin- Dr. W ende ll aketrt a
ine lead, played by Claire Gorman, among those who will take part in a
is done well but only well. Alison panel discussion on "Community Co-
Tenant makes a sufficiently virile operation and Character Outcomes."
and robustly attractive hero when she - --- - ----- --
gathers momentum, which is in the
middle of the first act.
Particular mention should go to D avis
"The Early Birdies," Jean Seeley,
Barbara Bates, and Valerie Rancu
for charming rhythmic singing. Prob-
ably the most realistic "faint on the
floor act" that the Lydia Mendelssohn
theater has ever shaken under is done
by Eleanor Wasey. It's great!
You should like this show. It'sP
all a lot of fun - not hilarious fun,
but enjoyable.
-- ii P I Tb II

Reed Receives
Nomination To
Legal Position.
New Deal Legislation Will
I Be Defended By New
Solicitor
WASHINGTON. March 20. -- UP) -
The New Deal's No. 2 legal post has
gone to a man who puts little faith
in "spell-binding tactics."
Stanley Reed, robust Kentuckian
nominated for solicitor general, relief
on quiet argument. His subdued style
'will be called into play before the su-.
preme court soon in defense of NRA
and other Roosevelt creations.
The 50-year-old lawyer and dairy
farmer will be second in command at
the department of justice as soon as
the Senate approves his appoint-
ment.
Reed is 12 years younger than J.
Crawford Biggs, the North Carolinian
who is stepping out of the solicitor's
spacious offices. His speech is crisp in
contrast to Bigg's southern drawl.
Although the new position will re-
quire him to represent the govern-
ment in the Supreme Court, Reed's
salary will be $2,500 less than the
$12,500-a-year he has been drawing
as general counsel for the Recon-
struction corporation. Reed will serve
as attorney general whenever that of-
fice is vacated by absence or disabil-
ity.
Defending the New Deal from legal
threats will be nothing new to him.
He appeared with Attorney General
Cummings in the gold clause hearings
before the Supreme Court and has
been active in preparing an NRA test
case which is to come up next mnonth.

MAY
FESTIVAL
Six Concerts
May 15,16,17,18
Soloists

SIX "NEW" ARTISTS

1

I

,

-Associated Press Photo.
Stanley Reed (above) of Kentucky,
who has been co-unsel general for the
RFC, has been nominated for the
post of solicitor-general of the United
States, to succeed J. Crawford Biggs,
who resigned.
Lecture On Crime
To Be Given Today
A lecture on "Crime Prevention"
will be given at 7:30 tonight at the'
Salvation Army Auditorium by "Pat"
Crowe, reformed burglar and kidnap-
er.
"Pat" has been in Ann Arbor for
more than a week in the interest of
his fight against crime. According
to Crowe, several city officials and
clergymen have endorsed his plan.

MARY MOOR E
New Brilliant Coloratura
Soprano of the Metropolitan
Opera
HELEN JEPSON
New Sensational Lyric Soprano
of the Metropolitan Opera
MYTRLE LEONARD
Star of the Metropolitan
Opera whom Schumann-
Heink calls "the other
Contralto."
MAXIM
PANTELEI EFF
Stupendous "Boris" of the
Russian Grand Opera
Company
WILBUR EVANS
American Baritone

I

SIX "OLD" FAVORITES

I

--

Su-perior
MILK.-ICE CREAM,
S pecial
VANILLA -- DELMONICO SALAD
Superior Dairy Company
Phone 23181

GIOVAN N I
MARTINEL LI
Leading Tenor of the
Metropolitan Opera
ETHYL HAYDEN
American Oratorio Soprano
JOSEF LHEVINNE
Distinguished Piano Virtuoso
PAUL A.LTHOUSE
Leading American Tenor of
the Metropolitan Opera
THEODORE WEBB
Favorite American Oratorio
Baritone
PAUL L EYSSAC
Narrator of the New York
Civic Repertory Theater
04O

SPRING FLOWERS
at Moderate Prices.
GENERAL MARKET
Flower Department
113 East Washington Phone 2-3147

- - - -o- I - - - a
109-111 E. Washington
Dial 8132

....from one end
to the other

Organizations
CHICAGO
SYMPHONY
ORCH ESTRA

o7

UNIVERSITY
CHORAL UNION
YOUNG PEOPLE'S
FESTIVAL CHORUS

'N
/

From one end to t
bitter, undevelope
Never a grimy, tou
use only the fragran
sive center leaves...t
you the mildest, bes
do not irritate your1
I'm your best friend
Sa anWW

the other-never a
d top leaf in me.

U ..

gh bottom leaf.

I

t, mellow, expen-
he leaves that give
st-tasting smoke.- I
throat-that's why
1, day in, day out.

x'h
t}
3
"r
;;*+.
:.
:"s
.'i
it
1
.""
""""
r:::.
t'
r':
::
ti
!."

Conductors

Earl V. MOORE
Musical Director
Frederick STOCK
Orchestra Conductor
Eric DeLAMARTER
Associate Conductor
Juva H IGBEE
Young People's Conductor
Howard HANSON
Guest Conductor

2 WORLD PREMIERES
BORIS GODUNOF
KIND DAVID PREMIERES
"DRUMTAPS" "JUMBLIES"

Choral Works

s0

*a

e AOR

- 0

Special Notice
Season Prices Reduced
The prices of season tickets
have been reduced $1.00 each to
the levels of $2.00, $3.00, and
$4.00 (former prices: $3.00,
$4.00, and $5.00) for holders of
Choral Union "Festival Cou-
pons," and to $5.00, $6.00, $7.00
(former prices, $6.00, $7.00 and
$8.00) for others.
Subscribers of record to pa-
trons' tickets will please mail in
their orders promptly on special
blanks mailed to each such sub-
scriber.
Orders from others will be

Ll

DNLY CENTER LEAVES

1 "'4

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan