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March 20, 1935 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 1935

Plan To Widen Swirling Dust Clouds Darken All Of Western Kansas

Professor Worrell Appointed
To FellowshipAdvisory Post
Appointment of Prof. William H. Jewish cultural center in Palestine.
Worrell of the oriental languages de- They have a fine university in Jeru-
partment to an Advisory Committee salem with some of the best minds
from Europe as instructors. The
on two annual fellowships was made teaching is done in Hebrew and the
recently by the Tenth Anniversary use of Hebrew as the spoken language
Convention of the Student Zionist is growing throughout the country."
Federation, Avukah. He also explained that; the members
This action was taken after the of the Jewish colonies, the Kvutzah,
although mainly employed in agri-
Convention had established the fel- culture, are also "engaged in devel-
lowships in order to promote the work oping the arts and trades." The
of the Avukah and to give opportunity Zionists have already bI ilt a large,
for a study of developments in Pal- modern well-equipped hospital there
estine. They allow a year of travel, and have been aided to success in im-
study, and work in that country and proving the country by the absence
are open to students who have com- of any business depression and the

3

-Associated Press Photo.
A dust storm so severe that street lights were turned on and automobiles required headlights, deposited
a heavy layer of silt over western Kansas. This unusual picture was taken a few minutes before the storm
rolled over Garden City, Kas.

Forestry Students In Demand
All Over Country, Dana Says
Dean Samuel T. Dana of the School The United States Biological Sur-
of Forestry and Conservation dis- vey, he continued, has requested that
closed yesterday in an interview that the University furnish up to six men
tpe students of the forestry school of to work on wild life management. The
the University are in demand for for- United States Bureau of Plant In-
estry projects all over the country. dustry has asked, according to Dean
"Letters have come," he said, "from Dana, to have a man from the Uni-!
the United States Forest Service Re- versity to study the damping off
gions of Alaska, the northwest, the disease in forest nurseries.
northeast, the lake and central states According to Prof. Shirley W. Al-
asking for students in the School of len of the School of Forestry and Con-
Forestry and Conservation to work servation, there have been some re-
this summer and, if possible, to con- quests for students in the forestry,
tinue working for a number of years school work as counsellors teaching
on forestry projects." forestry at summer camps.
The Alaskan regional forester has Dean Dana said, "Steps will be
written asking for about 12 men of made to fill these positions later in
forestry experience to work on the the year."
timber surveys and the boundary work
on Chugach and Tongass Nationalr
Forests, Dean Dana stated.
As he went through the list of re-
quests for men, Dean Dana stated that In Crib Dies t
requests for all men available have
come from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ho
Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, and Michigan
to work on wild life management,
emergency forestry work, and survey
and appraisal of land for purchase. Nine-Weeks-Old Infant Is
States from Maine, New Hampshire, Rushed From Coldwater
Vermont, and Pennsylvania to Oregon
and Washington have requested from Too Late For Treatment
aine to eleven men from the Univer-
sity experienced in survey and ap- Nine-veeks-old Clifford Stanley,
raisal of forestry land.k son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stanley,
Within the last six weeks letters of Coldwater, died in the University
sking for men to work in forest ex- o pCl ater, :d5d pin th Monda ,rs
periment stations have come from Hospital at 10:15 p.m. Monday, as
Asheville, N. C., Columbus, Ohio, doctors were preparing to give him
Flagstaff, Ariz., and New Orleans, La. treatment for severe burns, suffered
-- when his crib caught fire.
ad elsOf The infant boy was rushed here
ger Tells from Coldwater after Finn. the Stan-
M l hley's German shepherd dog, gave his
M ichiiufanSugar life in an attempt to save him from
a blazing room. The dog's frantic
barking attracted the attention of
Beet Industry the family in a nearby room.
Some hope was held for the baby
as an ambulance, bearing his burnedl
Describing the sugar beet industry little body, sped toward Ann Arbor.
n Michigan, which "pays out many He died, however, as hospital at-
nillions of dollars per year to farm- tendants were carrying him up an
ers in return for their crops, to em- elevator to a treatment room.
>loyees in wages, and to the State The Stanley's elder son, Roy, 17
end municipalities in taxes," Prof. years old, risked his own life in a
Walter L. Badger of the chemical futile attempt to save the dog. He
ngineering department spoke over was severely burned in entering the
Station WJR yesterday on the Mich- blazing room to remove the animal,
gan My Michigan hour broadcast after his baby brother had been res-
rom the campus studios in Morris cued by the father. He was believed
jall. to be out of danger last night.
Professor Badger pointed out that Stanley, a former welfare worker,
;rowing of beets is a different propo- explained that the furnace had ex-
iion than the growing of many ploded directly below the room in,
>ther crops. "Beets," he said, "are which the infant Clifford slept. TheI
ilways grown by contract between the rest of the family, he said, was in the
nill and the farmer. This contract kitchen and failed to 'hear the blast.
egulates the acreage the farmer shall They were completely unaware of the
put in, the type of seed he shall use, fire until summoned by the dog's
md the price he shall get for his barkings.
)eets."
The process of sugar making was HOWE GROWS WEAKER
lescribed by Professor Badger from WASWENGOWS Wa KER
he growing of the beets through the WASHINGTON, March 19. - (AP) -
utting and washing to the final stage Louis M. Howe, secretary to President
,utingan wahig t te fna stgeRoosevelt, was reported gradually
n which a syrup is formed, boiled ftrength late todayrinuais
ind then crystallized into what is illness at the White House.

Schoolmasters'
Club Will Hold
Annual Meeting
Meeting On April 26, 27
Will Mark Fifty Years Of
Service
Fifty years of existence and service
as a major organization working for
educational progress will be celebrat-
ed by the Michigan Schoolmasters'
Club at its annual meeting April 26
and 27 in Ann Arbor.
Four living charter members of the
club who have been active since its
inception in 1886 will be specially
honored during the sessions this year.
These men are Prof. John Dewey, Co-
lumbia University's distinguished
philosopher and educator; Prof. B.
L. D'Oge, of the Michigan State Nor-
mal College; Professor-Emeritus Jo-
seph Drake, of the University Law
School; and Levi D. Wines, emeritus
head of the mathematics department
in the Ann Arbor schools. Louis J.
Jocelyn, of Ann Arbor, secretary of
the club for 33 years and treasurer
for 26, will also be honored.
Featuring the two-day discussion
of educational and scientific problems
and reports will be the final debate
of the state-wide Michigan High
SchoolForensic Association, bringing
together the winners of a series of
debates in which over 12,000 students
have taken part, and the annual
Honors Convocation, held for the
honor students of the University.
At the latter event, Henry S. Den-
nison, president of the Dennison
Manufacturing Company, and a na-
tionally known leader in progressive
business management, will be the
speaker. He holds the honorary de-
gree of Doctor of Business Adminis-
tration from the University. Douglas
Malloch, noted author, will be the
Friday evening dinner speaker.
Prof. McClusky To Lead
Discussion At Lane Hall
The second in a series of discussions
for women students will be held at
4:30 p.m. today in the Upper Room
of Lane Hall. Prof. ,oward Y. Mc-
Clusky of the education school will
lead the discussion which will deal
with the various problems confront-
ing women students.
Patricia Woodward, '35, chairman
of the committee in charge of the
program, stated that the forum "will
be an informal discussion for women
students-concerning the choices which
every student must make on campus
- such as friends, activities and
courses.
New Cars for Taxi Service
H H
00
N N
CAMPUS CABS
24-HOUR SERVICE

pleted the freshman and sophomore
years at a recognized college or uni-
versity. Included in the fellowships
are the cost of living in one of the
Zionist colonies in Palestine and $250
for travelng and other expenses.
The holders of the fellowships will
be allowed to study at the library of
the Hebrew University and to take
an active part in the work of the
colonies. Upon return they will pre-
sent for publication a paper on life
in Palestine as observation and study
have revealed it.
Serving with Professor Worrell on
the Advisory Committee on the Fel-
lowships are Prof. Albert Einstein,
Profs. Felix Frankfurter and H. A.
Wolfson of Harvard, Prof. Isaac Hus-
ik ,of the University of Pennsylvania,
Prof. Kurt Lewin of Cornell, Prof.
Selig Perlman of Wisconsin, Prof. Ed-
ward Sapir of Yale, and James Water-
man Wise, editor of Opinion.
In commenting upon the Zionist
activities, Professor Worrell pointed
out that the most important of their
purposes was "the aim to create a
Allai"Nlazimova,
Romney Brent
Are Co-Starred
(Continued from Page 1)
feature Walter Slezak, Olive Olsen,
Paul and Lief Rocky -known in Eu-
rope as the Rocky Twins-Imogene
Coca, Nina Tarasova, and the dancers
Felicia Sorel and Demetrios Vilan.
Walter Slezak and Olive Olsen estab-
lished themselves here last season in'
the musical comedy "Meet My Sister."
The Rocky Twins have recently been
the features of the Central Park Ca-
sino and the St. Moritz in New York;
while they achieved success in Paris
as the dancing partners of Mistinguet
and Josephine Baker at the Casino de
Paris. Imogene Coca was the star of
"New Faces" in New York last year
and again this year in "Fools Rush
In."
Another player in "Up to the Stars"
will be the distinguished comedian,
Ilka Chase, who was co-starred this
year with Libby Holman in "Revenge
with Music," as well as in "Small Mir-
acle" and "On to Fortune." Also in-
cluded in the cast will be Alan Hand-j
ley and Mildred Todd, former Mich-
igan students who have been appear-
ing in New York productions.
Stewart Cheney has been engaged
as art director for the Dramatic Sea-
son. His designs for "The Old Maid"
and. "Times Have Changed" this win-
ter in New York have marked him by
experts as the brilliant discovery of
the season among scenic designers.
b -

C electrification of the country.
The lack of a business depression
can be ascribed to the valuable pro(-
ucts obtained from the waters of the
Dead Sea, and the building of power
plants on the Jordan River has al-
lowed the electrification of the coun-
try.
Those who wish to apply for the
fellowships to study ard travel in
this scene of Zionist activity should
write to the office of the Avukah for
information and application blanks,
the address of the office being 111
Fifth Avenue, New York City. The
applications must be in the hands of
the Committee on. Awards by April 1
and announcement of the successful
candidates will be made later in April,
their departure for Palestine to be this
summer.
Student Conipletes
Record State Map
The largest map of the lower penin-
sula of Michigan ever turned out by
the geography department has just
been completed by Kirk H. Stone, '35,
student assistant to Prof. Preston
E. James of, the geography depart-
ment. Having a scale of one inch on
the map equal to 125,000 inches on
the ground, the map measures nine
by six feet.
The map was made in connection
with some work being carried on by
Dr. Bruce, head of the post-graduate
medical school. It is an outline map
of the lower peninsula arranged by
counties, showing the number of
physicians in each county from Battle
Creek and Kalamazoo. Grand Rapids
and . Flint. Besides Dr. Bruce, Dr.
Nathan Sinai of the department of
hygiene and public health is going to
use it for some research work that
he is doing.

,

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Are Here Again!
B Y D E L vL,
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ENAMEL
Why Buy Unknown Quality?
Only , per Gal.
New Low Price
BOYDELL BONDED
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at
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ill.

Artur Rodzi sli
Will Conduct the CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA

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