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February 13, 1935 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-02-13

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THE MIICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRtUAR~Y 13, 1935

- -- - - - - -- -- I f

THE MICHIGAN DAILY bers of the less faithful headed for the exits, per-
haps convinced with our expert friend that the
exhibition was indeed disgusting. At this came
4 the loudest yelp of all. "Well, will you look at
that?" demanded the gentleman of the old school.
If anyone had walked out like that in the old
days, the crowd would have made them stick.
Well, that just shows you how spirit has
t .-fchanged .."
Faint
I-umblmgs . . .
t OME INDICATION that Michigan
students are not completely leth-
g "ar-ic is given ay the fact that to date they have

U

COL LEG IATE
OBSERVER

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Pubiisried every mornjing except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
-lI346 0I qEe 1935E
0 ANSOO WVSCONSs
MEMBER OIF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication if all news dispatches credited to it or
trot otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan. iPhone : 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. I1
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.............WILLIAMG.FERRIS
CITY EDITOR................. .JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ...................A..RTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ...................EI.3ANOR BLUJM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty,
Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, Iavid G. Mac-
donald, John M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPOR'1S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret 0. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Mu: phy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown, Cl4nton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
0. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard Weissmnan, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
mond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
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Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin,
Elizabeth Miller. Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Rueger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad. Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER.......... ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department. Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, GordonCohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe.
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie.
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margarette
Kollig, Ruth Clarke. Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernadine
Field, Betty Bowman, Judy Tresper. Marjorie Langen-
derfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
NIGHT EDITOR: ;THOMAS E. GROEHN

returned more ballots than any other of all the
115 student bodies included in the Literary Digest
peace poll -and this despite the fact that the
University is considerably smaller than a good
many of its rivals.
Perhaps the answer is that Michigan students
are interested in significant matters, but not in
the petty collegiateisms of another day. Per-
haps Michigan students are awaiting only devel-
opment of institutions adequate to stimulate and
express their real enthusiasms.
Were this found to be true, it would be a most
interesting discovery.
The SO-AP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
For The Flag
To the Editor:
I have read with considerable amusement the
remarkably well written letter from William L.
Fisch relative to militarism, the R.O.T.C., Fascism
and imperialistic war which appeared in your
issue of Jan. 26. Having served (in a mediocre
way) overseas in 1917-19, I agree with Mr. Fisch
that war as fought with our modern methods,
machinery, money and means is one of the worst
calamities that can fall to the lot of mankind.
But at this point my agreement ceases. Mr.
Fisch would abolish war by refusing to fight, by
lying down, supinely, belly-up, in the face of an
armed agression. Were all peoples, of all nations,
of such a temperament, it is obvious that there
would be no more wars because there would be
no more troops. Unhappily for mankind, but
fortunately for manhood, all men are not so con-
stituted.
In short, Mr. Fisch bases his strategy upon a
set of facts that will never exist. Were America
to follow his plan with any degree of unanimity,
this country would be at the mercy of almost any
minor power that chose to annex us.
Theories are fine. Sophomores should be en-
couraged to have them. They are inspiring at
the time, but after disillusionment that comes
later, they have a way of seeming a wee bit puerile,
When I was overseas, Mr. Fisch was about two
years old. His knowledge of war (so he says)
was gained from motion pictures. It cannot be
as clear, as stark, as horrible as the sort of knowl-
edge that comes from seeing and experiencing.
No one hates war more than the person who has
been through it.
But now is a time to be practical. Every major
European power is armed to the teeth. Old
jealousies have been revived. War debts have
complicated matters. If one's potential enemies
are so foolish as to arm themselves so efficiently
and at such great expense, what would America
do? Discard her own arms? Get ready to turn
the other cheek? Only a dreamer would say
"Yes." The R.O.T.C., by providing a large num-
ber of well educated junior officers is fulfilling
a function of major importance. It commends
itself to virile young men who are constitutionally
and temperamentally averse to taking a licking
lying down.
I believe that this nation is quite definitely com-
mitted to the policy of engaging in no more wars
save to defend our own borders. And should that
time come (which God forbid it may not!), when
an armed invader attacks us, Mr. Fisch and his
Student League will fade into the background of
forgotten theories as the manhood of this coun-
try rises to defend its flag.
"Flag?" Mr. Fisch may sneer.
"Yes, 'flag'," we repeat. Far better men than
Mr. Fisch or I have died for it before and will
gladly do so again.
-Philip C. Pack
Captain, Infantry
Asst. G-3, 32nd Division

By BUD BERNAR.)
When professors kiss co-eds outside of school,
that isn't news; it's scandal. But when they do
it openly in class - that is news.
A professor of psychology at Syracuse Univer-
sity suddenly bent over and kissed the beautiful
co-ed who sat at the front of the room. And
in spite of the fact that it was a psychology ex-
periment to prove that a sudden emotion can be
,measured by the perspiration on the hands-in
spite of that, the young lady had such a "sud-
den emotion" that it was several minutes before
the recording instrument regained its normal
composure enough to continue with the experi-
ment. Luckily for her, however, the instrument
does not record whether her emotions were pleas-
ant or unpleasant.
According to reports Huey Long is only
acting in self defense - professors are taking
over politics . . . so he'll run Louisiana State
University.
The Daily Kansan comes to the fore with an
editorial scoring the "colossal inconsistency of
women." This same inconsistency says the
Kansan, is nowhere more apparent than in the
matter of dress. We quote: "on a frigid day one
sees scores of women dressed in fur coats. But
with these cozy garments they wear no hats,
and they fail to button the coats. Girls with
college intellect go without food to own a fur
coat. They attach this garment to the person
by means of the sleeves and let the rest bellow
out behind, a flag flaunted in the face on their
non-fur-bearing "sisters."
Stories about finals are again appearing.
This incident took place in a math class at
Corneri University about the week before fin-
als. The instructor walked into the room and
announced that he would give the class an
idea of the material they would be responsible
for on the final.
"You will have to know," he began, "all
the equations on page 10. Then, there are
several good problems from pages 15 to 35
which are good examples of the type I expect
to ask you. You might commit the formulas
on page 50 to your memory, and if you know
all these things and the basic principles of
the course, you should have no trouble with
the exam. Now are there any questions about
the course?"
A single student waved his hand frantically.
"Yes, what is it?" asked the instructor.
The student hung his head a bit and then
questioned, "What text book are we using in
this course?"
7'

BOOKS TO BUY OR SELL?
ROOMS TO RENT?
DO YOU NEED A ROOM?
DO YOU WISH YOUR
CHANGE OF ADDRESS
PUBLISHED,?
One Answer.
USE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED AIDS
Cash Rates lic Line (5 words)
(or, roe for Three or More, Insertions)
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
420 Maynard Street
g&

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A Washington
BYSTANDER

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More
Longiana .
QUITE SOME TIME AGO The Daily
called attention to the fact that
Huey P. Long, oaf of the canebreaker, was a man
to match in American public life. "It is high
time that the intelligent section of the American
people took Huey Long for the very real threat to
American traditions and ideals that he really is,"
we said on that occasion.
Since then Huey has gone on his unrestrained
way; he has'made himself dictator of Louisiana;
he has uncovered a plot against his life and thus
squashed an anti-Long uprising; he was amazingly
effective in arousing opinion against the World
Court in the recent Senate vote; he has organized
his campaign forthe 1936, and more likely the
1940, bid fo the presidency by establishing
"Share-The-Wealth" Clubs throughout the nation.

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Everything that Huey does these days is done
with the White House in mind. His belated
"honeymoon" was a play for the love-and-kisses
vote. "Love Is Sweeping the Country" sang the
presidential candidate in "Of Thee I Sing." Huey
took the satire and enacted it into life. After
his fiasco in the washroom of the Sand's Point
Yacht Club he gave up drinking and today is a
teetotaler, completely and blatantly. That ought
to be good for the hintherland vote.
Huey may not have what it takes to make a
great statesman; in fact he hasn't. But he cer-
tainly has what it takes to make a genuine bid
for the presidency during a time of economic
distress. "He (Long)" says Paul Y. Anderson, "is
a tough baby, a very tough baby. It will pay to
watch him."
It will also pay to stop him.

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By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, February 12
THE LATEST Democratic National Committee
output is an attractively-typed little affair on
blue paper headed "Thumbnail Sketches of Wom-
men You Hear About in The New Deal." It con-
tains about 50 names and it certainly emphasizes
the Roosevelt administration flair for giving the
ladies a.place in the political sunlight.
The women's division of the national committee
got out the who's who and who's what of the wom-
en of the "New Deal." Its subjects range from
Madam Secretary Perkins, Madam Senator Cara-
way and Her Honor, Judge Florence E. Allen of
the United States Circuit Court of Appeals -
"just one step below the Supreme Court of the
United States," as the committee commentator
puts it, down through a wide range of big city
postmistresses, women collectors of the port, state
administrators of relief, housing and many other
"New Deal" alphabetical activities.
WHAT is coming, one might suppose, is a drive
in '36 for the feminine vote on the basis of
the Roosevelt administration's record of femin-
ine appointees. The worried republicans may be
planning new voter and "young Republican" ap-
peals but genial Jim Farley's Democratic organi-
zation already is well advanced on a program
of enticing the ladies to the polls next time the
"New Deal" goes to the election bat which the
out-of-power party cannot hope to match.
Throughout the thumbnail sketches runs the
notation that this or that woman was "first" to
pick off for her sex the particular political plum
involved. Until you see it in black and white-
or rather in the attractive two shades of blue used
-it is hard to realize just how far the Roose-
velt administration has been going in drawing
women into party and official life. There are so
many appointments of women "for the first time
in history" that the sketch writer is moved to
remark that it is "a phrase which President Roose-
velt is rapidly making hackneyed."
CASUAL SURVEY of the party activity back-
grounds of the women named suggests an-
other possible title. It could read "Party Politics
Pays, Ladies." With rare exceptions the femin-
ine "New Deal" office-holders attained their pres-
ent proud status by service on the national com-
mittee, on state committees or as delegates to
national conventions, particularly the '32 conven-
tion that put Mr. Roosevelt in the White House.
The ladies have had a special place at the "New
Deal" patronage pie counter.
Madam Secretary Perkins is one of those ex-
ceptions. Her sketch records no party worker
activity at all. And another is the only woman

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Akichigan

1. SUBSCRIPTIONS

/
/

The Old
School .

SPEIL

Daily

Insatiable Botanist
To the Editor:
A Japanese Esperantist sent me a letter, a
translation of which follows.
Readers of this column who have the desired
objects are requested to send them to Mr. Kangi
Momoi.
-Francis S. Onderdonk
Dear and Honorable Friends:
I am a botanist, and collect moss, and lichens
(herpes). Do these plants interest you? I wish
to collect specimens of these from all over the
world. These can be gathered in fields, forests,
and on mountains, trees, stones, and even on
tombstones. Will you help me? I desire your
help as far as you are able to give it. If you are
agreeable please send me specimens of these
plants. I enclose instructions for their prepara-
tion.
If possible the moss shall have a seed-pod, and
the lichen an unbroken edge.
Each speciment should be about,10 cm. by 15 cm.
Do not press them, but dry them naturally in
the sun with the reverse side upwards.
Pack each specimen separately.

For SECOND SEMESTER $2.25
2. J-HOP EXTRAS
SECOND EDITIONS ...:.. 10c
3. J-HOP PICTURES
Beautifully Finished ... 10 x 20
Only $1.00
Phone 2-12 14
or Call at
Student Publications Buildling,
420 Maynard Street

A GENTLEMAN OF MIDDLE AGE
sat in the stands of Yost Field
House the other night and saw what he and many
others considered a very poor exhibition of the
caging art.
But while others confined their expressions of
disgust to muttered imprecations, our gentleman
of the old school shouted his beliefs down the
necks of those in front of him until in self-defense
they had to pretend agreement to anything he
said.
"Shoot, shoot," he shrilled insistently. "They
don't teach the boys to shoot these days. It isn't

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