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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH ..-- _.HI A DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 193

British Submit
Estimates For

THE SCREEN

AT THE MICHIGAN
Army Expense "DEVIL DOGS OF THE AIR"

_ .
_.

House Of Commons Gets
Paper Providing F o r
$2,000,000 Increase
LONDON, March 4. - (P) - The
largest military expenditures in re-
cent years, an increase of nearly $2,-
000,000 over last year, were provided
for in the army estimates submitted to
the House of Commons today.
German rearmament was men-
tioned particularly in the white paper,
and increased armaments in the Unit-
ed States, Russia and Japan were also
noted.
It is necessary to commence re-
placement of Great Britain's capital
ships at an early date, the white
paper said,
The army estimates, for the fiscal
year beginning April 1, call for £43,-
550,000 ($207,298,000). In submitting
them, Lord Hailsham, war minister,
said that "in the deliberate judgment
of the government the time has now
arrived when action should be taken
to bring our military preparations
more up to date."
The white paper affirmed the gov-
ernment's confidence in the ultimate
triumph of peaceful methods. But in-
creased expenditures for defense, it
was said, could no longer safely be
postponed.
There was a risk to peace in Brit-
ain's disarmament while other nations
were not disarming, the white paper
said, and added:
"In diminishing our own security
we lid not contribute to general dis-
armament."
Great Britain, it was said, could not
overlook increased armaments in the
United States, Russia and Japan and
elsewhere throughout the world.
Regarding German rearmament, it
was said:
"If this rearmament continues at1
the present rate, the existing anxieties
of 'Germany's neighbors will be in-
creased and peace itself may be im-
periled."
Red Cross Expert
To Conduct Course1

i

A Warner Brothers' picture co-star-
ring James Cagney and Pat O'Brien, and
featuring Margaret Lindsay and Frank
Mc~luzh. Also a Zasu Pitts-Thelmna Todd
comedyPaul Tompkins organ program,
and a news reel.
WHAM! CR-R-R-ASH! E-E-E-E-
YOW (shrapnel)!
Paul Tompkins' organ prelude to
"Devil Dogs of the Air" tells the story
better than any review could hope to,
Before the intimate little details of
who wrote the story, who photo-
graphed the picture, etc., have disap-
peared from the screen, the audience
has been set in high gear by the Bar-
ton Organ's martial airs. And "Devil
Dogs of the Air" then marches ahead
to spin its sometimes laborious, some-
times pleasingly comical, but always
jingoistic tale of life in the air force
of the marines. From first shots of
the marines being reviewed to the
war "games" near the finale, the in-
vidious business of war is painted pink
and gold. Pat O'Brien, beefy, mascu-
line, authoritative, and dapper,
"tough" James Cagney are the artists
who do the painting.
What entertainment there is for
the discerning cinemagoer in "Devil
Dogs of the Air" will be found in its
on-the-ground scenes, which could
just as well be laid in a non-marine
setting. Phrasing it differently, from
dedication to fadeout, cinematic boost
for the tom-tom beaters is the most
frankly propagandizing motion pic-
ture to emerge from Hollywood in re-
cent years. If we accept the premise
that war is neither attractive nor so-
cially desirable, "Devil Dogs of the
Air" should be on the black list, no
doubt about it.
--G.M.W.,Jr.
Beer Ban Repealed
By Oregon Council
(Special to The Daily)
EUGENE, Ore., March 4-In a
heatedsession featured by debate for
and against the bill, the Eugene City
Council last Tuesday repealed the
University Beer Zoning Ordinance
which was much the same as the
Ann Arbor law, and at the same time
agreed to back fully any action which
Oregon University may care to take
on the matter.
The bill which was repealed by the
Eugene City Council was in many
ways similar to the Ann Arbor Ordin-
ance which says that no beer may
be served east of Division Street,1
agitation for the repeal which came
to a head last year when the pro-
posed repeal was defeated by a city-
wide vote.;
The argument for repeal of the
Oregon bill was that it was driving;
the students down town where they
came in contact with degrading in-
fluences. Those who opposed the:
repeal based their argument on the
supposition that if the bill were re-
pealed the effects of selling beer near
the campus would be harmful.
REGISTER YOUR CABY NOW 1
The state health department in
Alabama has launched a "register
your baby" campaign in hopes of
stimulating greater parental coop-1
eration in gathering vital statistics.

Units Of Local
Governments
Are Criticized
Professor Bromage Makes
Charges In Radio Speech
Sunday
A direct attack was made upon
the "too numerous" local governing
units and their uncorrelated functions
by Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the
political science department in his
talk over Station WJR broadcast Sun-
day from the campus studios in Mor-
ris Hall.
Local government, according to
Professor Bromage, includes counties,
villages, towns, townships, boroughs,
school districts, and special district
corporations such as fire, drainage,
irrigation, or even mosquito abate-
ment districts. In other words, he
stated, there is a local governmental
unit for about every 800 men, women,
and children of the United States.
"State leadership," asserted Pro-
fessor Bromage, "has been sadly lack-
ing in the consolidation and elimina-
tion of local units."
In county administration, he point-
ed out, there stands strikingly
apparent the absence of any corre-
lation of functions. "Separate offi-
cials," Professor Bromage tremarked,
"all go their own ways. A system of
departments dealing with related
matters is necessary." He blamed the
retarded development of an orderly
system of county government on the
fact that there is no chief county
executive.
Prof. R. D. McKenzie of the sociol-
ogy department defended sociological
local inventories which map the re-
sults of social behavior in his radio
addressgbefore the talk of Professor
Bromage.
"If we continue our analyses over a
period of years," Professor McKenzie
said, "we can discover the trend of
our community's development and
thus gain information that will assist
us in directing that development more
in conformity with our wishes and
ideals."
Prof. Dickinson
Describes Board
(Continued from Page 1)
sent the complainant, but invariably
the company is represented by coun-
sel, who argues the case before the
board or its representative, the exam-
iner. Both the complain by the worker
and the defense of the company con-
cerned is heard by the examiner, who
aids the worker in the presentation
of his case if the latter does not have
a lawyer.
The full proceedings of the hearing
are taken down by a court reporter,
Professor Dickinson explained, and a
report by the examiner is appended
to the account.
The final decison is handed down
by the board, of which Dr. Leo Wol-
man is chairman, and is issued on the
basis of the facts brought out at the
hearing. The decision of the Board is
absolutely final and, according to the
automobile code, must be accepted by
both parties, Professor Dickinson de-
clared.

Walter A.hHausknecht, swimming
expert of the National Red Cross
headquarters, will conduct the an-
nual course for examiners in Red
Cross Life Saving, this week. These
classes are designed for those who
have already fulfilled the Red Cross
requirements in Life Saving and
wish- to qualify as examiners, in-
structors, or directors of swimming
pools, beaches, or summer camps.
Classes will be conducted for men
in the swimming pool of the Intra-
mural Building from 1:30 to 4:30
p.m., Wednesday, Thursday, and Fri-
day afternoons, March 6, 7, and 8.
Classes for women will be held at I
7 p.m., Friday, March 8 in the Y.M.'
C.A. pool, and at 8:30 a.m. Saturday
in the Union pool.
Mr. Hausknecht will be available
for personal interviews from 10:30;
p.m. until noon Tuesday in Room;
302 of the Michigan Union.

I-

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I

You can no longer afford to send your
laundry home. Our ROUGH DRY (semi-
finish) bundle for students is far more
economical than any other laundry serv-
ice. This gives you finished laundry on
shirts, handkerchiefs, and socks. Under-
wear and pajamas are washed, dried and
ready for wear.

Price per Pound
(Minimum Bundle-

loc

0 0!

50c )

Shirts, Extra

loc

#0 0 0

Full Dress Shirts not included in this Service

"

Gouged by a Gimn-ne Girl?

.*.04,.AP "0 /+'9o4/

Sox, Extra, pair,
Handkerchiefs,

Extra

Ic

. . 2c

. .

--,

SAMPLE BUNDLE

3
6
3
2
2
1

SHIRTS FINISHED
HANDKERCHIEFSSR
PAIRS F SOXSERVICE
PAIRS OF SOX WASHED - -DRIED
SUITS UNDERWEAR )
BATH TOWELS FOLDED
PAJAMA SUIT / READY TO WEAR

TOTAL COST 92c

For This New ROUGH DRY SERVICE, Call any of the following Laundries:

VARSITY LAUNDRY
Phone 2-3 123

TROJAN LAUNDRY
Phone 9495

oifi bv ).'-Jin I the WKick . *.(.1011 tL)! L i

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