100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5,1934

THE MIC HIG AN DAILY

PAGE TB

Kipke Stresses
Pass Defense
In Long Drill
Regeczi Tests Defensive
As le Tosses Passes
Against Varsity
Handicapped by a light line and a
still lighter backfield, Michigan State
will be forced to rely almost entirely
on an aerial attack against a heavier
opponent this Saturday. Realizing
that pass defense is the most essen-
tial part of this .week's practice ses-
sions, Coach Kipke has been drilling
his players consistently on that phase
of the game.
A freshman squad well versed in
State plays, and augmented by the
presence of John Regeczi in the back-
field, provided the offensive opposi-
tion in yesterday's practice session.
Play after play went between tackle
and guard with a plentiful intermin-
gling of passes.
Regeczi Tests Defense
A note that was struck at the be-
ginning of the season when Regeczi
practiced tossing footballs over the
scrimmage line was continued today
with the return to the fold of the man
who is counted upon to uphold the
regular punting job in the manner in
which he has performed for two out-
standing seasons.
Regeczi threw flat passes over the
line and to the side, plays that were
good for four yards on every com-
pleted attempt and there were quite
a few. Then he threw passes down
the center that were unusually suc-
cessful, tosses that were snatched
from the very middle of the defense.
Once in a while a longer pass went
out to either side of the line.
Meyers For Savage
Earl Meyers took the end post us-
ually held down by Mike Savage. Earl
has shown a great deal of improve-
ment and has shown a special apti-
tude on offense.
Earlier in the afternoon, Regeczi
and Oliver punted down the field as
James, Pillinger, and Triplehorn took
turns in running the ball back..
The first team lined up with Mey-
ers and Ward at the ends, Viergiver
and Austin at the tackles, Hildebrand
and Borgmann at the guards, and
Jerry Ford alternated with Fuog at
center. The backfield consisted of
Oliver, Triplehorn, Patanelli, and
Remias.
GRIDDERS PLANT WHEAT
Henry and Bob Kirk, brothers in
the Kansas State backfield, put in 2,-
000 acres of wheat at their home near
Scott City, Kan., last summer, alter-
nating at twelve-hour shifts on the
tractor, which operated 24 hours a
day.
dI

Gehringer Safe At First When Hallahan Muffs The Ball

Bachman Still
Undecided On
Spartan Lineup
State May Use Two Full
Teams Against Michigan
Here Tomorrow
EAST LANSING, Mich., Oct. 4. -
UP --Michigan State's 29th meeting
with the University of Michigan at
Ann Arbor Saturday is likely to be in!
great contrast to the game of twoI
years ago when the famous "iron
man" team played against the Wol-
verines.
Present indications are that Coach
Charlie Bachman will use at least two
complete teams against Michigan, and
the names of the players who will
start will probable be undetermined
until after the final practice session
here Friday afternoon.
Bachman is moving swiftly in an
I effort to build up the center of State's
line to the greatest possible strength,
but to date he has not been very
successful. Gilliland, Demarest and
Armstrong are outwith injuries and
it is not likely they will be able to
play Saturday.
Just what backfield combination
will start against Michigan also is
doubtful. Tuesday Bachman used
Steve Sebo, the Battle Creek soph-
omore, considerably, but on Wednes-
day Sebo was not so much in the
picture. Russell Reynolds and Kurt
Warmbein will probably be two of the
starting backs, while Sidney Wagner,
guard, and Edward Klewicki and
Louis Zarza, ends, should get the
opening call in the line.
The coaches spent lots of time Wed-
nesday drilling the team on defense.
Walter O'Hara, president of the
Narragansett Park, Pawtucket, (R.I.)
race track, expects to have Cavalcade
and Discovery meet for a $25,000
added purse over a mile an three-six-
Steenths on Columbus day, Oct. 12, in
a weight for age race.

BOX SCORE

Golf Championshiip
Finals Begin Today

ST. LOUIS CARDINA

AB R
Martin, 3b ........5 1
Rothrock. rf .......4 0
Frisch, 2b ........5 0
Medwick, if .......5 0
Collins, lb ........5 0
Delancey, c .......5 1
Orsatti. cf.........4 0
Durocher, ss......4 0
Hallahan, p .......3 0
W. Walker p......1 0
Totals .......41 2

H
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
'7

LS Thirty-six,.holes of medal play this
O A E afternoon and tomorrow morning will
1 1 1 determine the University golf cham-
4 0 0 pionship. Sixteen have qualified for
3 5 1 the final rounds, to be played at the
0 0 0 University golf course, beginning at
12 2 0
10 0 0 1:30 p.m. today and at 8:30 a.m. to-
2 0 0 morrow.
1 3 0' The pairings and today's starting
1 3 1 times: Greenstreet and MacPherson
1 1 0 --1:30: Schwarz and Harwood --- 1 :30
__ -- Griffith and Van Zile - 1:42: White-
34 15 3 head and Waterman - 1:48; Benton
run was and Sankey -2:04: Saunders and
Malloy - 2:10; Van Winkle and Hall
-- 2:16; Killins and Morriss-2:22.

(One out when winning
scored).
DETROIT TIGERS

White, cf .......,.
Doljack, cf .......
Cochrane, c ......
Gehringer, 2b ....
Greenberg, lb ....
Goslin, If .......
Rogell, ss .......
Owen, 3b .......
Fox, rf .........
Rowe, p .........
*G. Walker .......

AB R
.4 0
.1 0
.4 0
.4 1
..4 0
.6 0
.4 1
.5 0
.5 1
..4 0
..1 0
42 3

H
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
2
0
1
7

0
4
1
8
4
13
2
1
0
2
1
0
36

A
0
0
0
5
1
1
2
1
0
1
0
11

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

ALL-CAMPUS TENNIS
All first and second-round
matches of the All-Campus tennis
tournament must be completed by
Sunday evening.
John Johnstone.

III

-Associated Press Photo
With three errors in yesterday's World Series game, the Cardinals appeared as if they were trying to
catch up with the Detroit infield. None of the errors figured in the scoring however. This play shows "Wild
Bill" Hallahan muffing a throw to first. Gehringer is the runner, but he was left when Hank Greenberg
grounded to Pepper Martin at third. Hallahan's pitching, however, was very little short of sensational for the
first eight innings, the Tigers getting but four hits before their one-run rally that tied the score. Bill Walker,
who reliefed Hallahan after Gerald Walker's blow in the ninth was charged with the defeat.

Totals

Entries Open
For Intramural
Touch Football
All Independents who are interest-
ed in competing in the touchball
tournament for non-fraternity men
should report to the Intramural de-
partment his intention of entering by
Oct. 15. Play will start Oct. 18.
- Touch football is a team sport
therefore an individual may either as-
sume the responsibility of a manager
and invite participants to play on his
team or turn in his name and be
placed on a team by the department.
In 1921 when the sport was intro-
duced four teams were entered; last
year twelve teams competed and in-
dications this year point to at least
fifteen this season.
The game is similar to regular foot-
ball except that the dangers of bodily
contact have been eliminated. In
past seasons it has proved an answer
to those who desire to play football
and are not out for the freshman or
Varsity teams.
This sport is part of the Intramur-
al department's fall program for In-
dependents. The others included in
the fall program are volleyball and
cross-country. These are also team
Vports.
George Earnshaw is a great money
finisher. With a promised bonus of
$500 each for all over 10 wins, he
came under the wire with his four-
teenth victory and $2,000.
Vest Ca ins
for
STUDENT WEAR
$1.25 to $2.50
Formal
KEY CHAINS

A.

r

STAR DUST

By ART
CARSTENS

*Batted for White in 9th.
Score by Innings
St. Louis .......011 000 000 000-2
Detroit .........000 100 001 001-3
Runs batted in - Orsatti 1, Med-
wick 1, Fox 1, G. Walker 1, Goslin 1.
(Earned runs: St. Louis 2; Detroit 2.)
Two base hits - Rogell, Fox, Martin.
Three base hits - Orsatti. Stolen
bases - Gehringer. Sacrifices-Roth-
rock, Rowe. Left on bases - St. Louis
4; Detroit 13. Base on balls -Off
Hallahan 4, (Cochrane 2, Greenberg
1, Gehringer 1,); off Walker 3 (Rogell,
Gehringer 1, Greenberg 1. Struck out
- by Hallahan, 6, Owen, Rowe 3,
Greenberg 2; by W. Walker 2, Coch-
rane 1, Rowe 1; Rowe 7, Medwick 2,
Hallahan 1, Collins 1, W. Walker 1,
Rothrock 1, Delancey 1. Hits - Off
Hallahan 6 in 8 1-3 innings; Walker
1 in 3 innings. Umpires - Klem, N.Y.,
plate; Geisel, A.L., first base; Rear-
don, N.L., second base; Owens, A.L.
third base. Time of game - 2:48.

PPERRY'S CAFE
105 So. Thayer St.
SUNDAY SPECIAL
Fruit Cocktail
Chicken Noodle Soup
Half Fried Spring Chicken
or
Tenderloin Steak

AP - I

D TROIT, Oct. 4. -Schoolboy
Rowe again reigns in the hearts ofI
1,900,000 Detroiterskas the modern
miracle man, the Arkansas speed mer-
chant, the youth who today pulled
all the feathers out of the Cardinal's
tail and beat them in twelve thrill-

all afternoon. Rowe fanned four times
and Greenberg twice. Edna Mary
Skinner attended the game in a new
fur coat and, incidentally, met the
handsome George Raft.
* *Y: *

Mashed Potatoes
Creamed Peas
Pineapple and
Cream Cheese Salad
Parker House Rolls
Chocolate Sundae
Coffee Tea Milk
50c

I1

packed innings. TOE MEDWICK took his razzing
from the bleacherites good na-
T HEY MURMURED: "He's a turedly, tossing back their quips with
warm weather pitcher," when a vengeance and playing a fine game
he allowed six hits in three in- besides.
nings, but were quick to sense the
difference in his work after the The real break of-the game, as
near-disastrous third. He really far as the Tigers were concerned,
bore down. Hallahan was pitching was Collins' failure to catch Wal-
a fast ball with plenty of smoke kasCo flron thr ase
but Rowe's fast ones in the last ker's pop fly down the first base
five innings had the Cards swing- line in the ninth. The/ ball was
ing dizzily - and hopelessly. fair when Collins went after it,
* * * but dropped safe and roiled foul.
A dozen cops massed in the Card Walker was already perched on
dugout as the ninth inning neared to first and the umpires ruled it a
protect the St. Louisans in their exit safe hit. However, they changed
from the field. They were convenient- their decision and recalled Wal-
ly near when a youngish man in a ker. He promptly hit his single.
gray tweed coat passed out during -
the last of the ninth. DEPUTIES PROTECTED
* , * *

I;.

FOOTBALL
Tomorrow 2 P.M.
MICHIGAN
vs.
MICHIGAN STATE
The fellow who
keeps warm is wear-
ing a MILTON
Overcoat ...

MORE QUALITY
THAN YOU PAY FOR IN
HART SCHAFFNER & MARX
SUITS OF
ANGOLA
$25 1U

I

MCHAR PER~M
"0
Come Down Off
Your High Horse.
This FINE HAT
it Only. . .
$ &
0 We know you're never paid
less than $7. and that every $5.
hat you ever tried on looked
sort of funny.
* But we know this hat as well
as we know you . . . and we
know that if you'll try one on
for the fun of it, you'll buy it
for the looks of it.
* In looks . . . in feel . . .on
your head ... to your fingers-
this hat is a world beater and
while ue can't give names here,
we'll whisper that we are sell-
ing this hat every day to men
who you think are paying $10
and maybe more.

I

BABE RUTH sat in the press box
again today. He accepted oney
fielding chance and was charged
with one error. A high foul bounced
off the railing within a foot of him
but the Bambino muffed it and* the
ball fell into the boxes below.
* * *
Ernie Orsatti is going to be the
goat of the series if he isn't care-
ful. The Cardinal right fielder
made two errors yesterday and
might have been charged with
another bobble today when he
misjudged Fox's fly and finally
had to turn a somersault trying to
reach it. Scorer Salsinger, how-
ever ruled it a two-base hit.for
Fox instead of an error for Or-
satti.
Al Schacht, George Raft and Joe E.
Brown put on the funniest comedy
skit seen in the present series before
today's game. Rowe and Hank Green-
berg were both trying to kill the ball

BRIDGEPORT, Pa., Oct. 4-U(RP)-
Five sheriff's deputies, arrested after
a bystander was shot to death during
a textile strike outbreak, were taken
to the Norristown jail today for pro-
tection from several thousand arous-
ed citizens.
Ellwood Quick, 23, was shot in the
disturbance at the James Lees and
Sons textile mill Wednesday as offi-
cers escorted workers from the plant
through a crowd of strikers, and died
later in a hospital.
The five deputies-Howard White,
Joseph Smith, Wilbur Parker, Robert
Pinkertongand Harry Hildebeitel-
took refuge in the mill, where police
arrested them on charges of homi-
cide.

I

In

e

MI LIONS
CLOT H ES
$16.50 and $22.50
119 So. Main

i$33.50

to

Shirtcraft Shirts -- Superior Underwear -- Burg Hats
CONLIN--WETHERBEE

III

116 WASHINGTON STREET

,

White

$0.0

SPORT

In the New, Natural
Gold Finish $1.75
Burr, Patterson &Auld
The Fraternity Jewelers
at Michigan
603 CHURCH STREET
Frank & Ruth Ann Oakes

Tolan, In Training For
Comeback, Beats Stoller
Eddie Tolan, training for a profes-
sional running campaign in Australia,
defeated Sam Stoller, Varsity dash
man, twice yesterday, at 50 and 75
yards. His time for the 50 was 5.7
seconds and for the 75 was 7.8 sec-
onds. He ran against the wind both
times.

CLOTHES for FALL!
It's the Style Trend!

' t.
.

Clothes that bring you freedom
of motion and comfort in every

Ii

i

W E'RE NOT FOOLIN'... !
For some time we've been telling you
of the personal service our plant offers
in Cleaning and Pressing. Many have
discovered the truthfulness of this
statement and have chosen to send their
clothes to us regularly. Why not phone
6868 and find out for yourself?
HABERDASHERY
I- l tA M 7- r^T Cr-1 r e- T ~I

posture . * */*.

SUITS & TOPCOATS.
SHOES............
SHIRTS . ... . -
NECKWEAR.

$30.00 to $38.50
$3.50 to $5.00
$2.00 to $2.50
..$1.00 to $2.00

* In shades
fabrics.

to match all 1935

Exclusive NOT Expensive

WALK A FEW STEPS
A ATT -~ C A 47CFr.'T T 1A D

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan