100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 18, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH-E --MICHIGAN -DAILY

TUESDAY,

TUESDAY,

This Week Is Only
The Beginning.. .

E ARLY TODAY the class of'38 enters
upon that strange interlude known
officially as Orientation Period and more infor-
mally as Freshman Week. Such a period is no
novelty at Michigan, but has come into vogue at
the great majority of American colleges and uni-
versities, which fact alone may indicate some-
thing of its value as an educational weapon.
Helpful as such a week may be to the admin-
istration of the University, it has beery conceived
and designed primarily for the benefit of . the
freshman himself. It is successful only insofar
as it justifies itself from that standpoint.
.If the program as a whole lacks some of 'the
attractiveness of a.college football game or one of
the big dances of the year, its. directors are
scarcely to be blamed-for poor showmanship. Their
purpose is not to compete with more alluring forms
of entertainment. What is more, if the schedule
is not perfect in every detail, or if it fails to suit
students of widely varying interests, it is still much
more than the whim of college professors who have
lived too long.
Probably no;freshman :will realize ,until next
semester and the several semesters followingthat
getting through the registration and classification
lines intact is more exacting than any course in
the curriculum. To the freshman alone is granted
the privilege of a personally-conducted tour
through the No Man's Land of red tape in this
large University.
Beginning today the University is catering espe-
cially to the incoming class. After this one week,
the individual freshman will be leftto his own
devices; he will be one more or less among a
student body of eight or nine thousand. After this
one week the University will no longer come to
him; he must go to the University.
The Figures Can
Do No Wrong.. .
(N ALMOST every University office
I administrators and clerks have
been hopefully peering since early summer at every
set of figures that might give some hint as to
the student enrollment for 1934-35 With registra-
tion actually underway, the situation is bound to
become even more alarmingly tense in the next
week or two. Students, faculty, alumni, and towns-
people will daily peruse the latest statistics, trust-
ing that in the end the University may record six
more freshmen than ever before, and that the
literary college will number 53 students greater
than last year.
"Early figures make an increased enrollment
seem highly possible. An increase is desirable not
because mass production is the prevailing ideal of
an institution of higher learning, but because it is
a worthwhile index of return to more normal times,
both on and off the campus.
No one holds any brief for the continuance of
depression years. They have worked great hard-
ship on students who have had to struggle along
on very little. They have worked general hardship
on all who have atterjded a University with cur-3
tailed facilities.
But just as the score may not always tell how
good the game has been, depression years-have not
been all bad. In many ways they have been saner
ones than those that went before. Certainly they
have been interesting and challenging to college
students. Michigan's name has become no less
famous because it houses fewer students or treats
them a little less royally.
Whatever the outlook for the future as regis-
tered in this year's figures, at least one more year
of hard times, of trial and error, of challenging
problems is ahead. The upperclassman has be-
come hardened to it; the freshman will be no worse
off for beginning his college career under such
conditions.

Collegiate Observer
! By BUD BERNARD
Blessings on thee little frosh
Fertile soil for brother's bosh
With that silly freshman cap,
And the smugness of thy map,
With the tales of high school years
Falling flat on college ears,
Care not what the Greeks may
tell you
Our house is the best one for you,
Your dough, you know, they do
not hate
Blessings on thee '38.
At the University of Maryland it is a custom
that freshmen shall not wear tuxedos or full dress.
The rule originally was made in order to spare
freshmen the expense of purchasing formal eve-
ning wear.
* * * *
At the University of New Mexico a freshman
has gained prominence already. He has drunk
so much coffee and has eaten so many dough-
nuts .that he has everyone calling him a
a regular dunkard.
* * * *
At Stanford University the freshmen co-eds
can stay out until 12 o'clock week nights and until
two o'clock Saturday nights - if she passes a
physical examination. Must be a, strain.

NEW CARS FOR TAXI SERVICE
PP
H H
00
E4545N
CAMPUS CABS
24-HOUR SERVICE
NEW STUDENTS
You will be impressed by the kind of
Service you will find at the Uni-
tarian Church. It Is intellectually
progressive and emotionally sound -
Bring your honest doubts and your
most dangerous ideals with you.
September 23rd at 10:45 -
Mr. Marley will speak on
"Religion and Social Sanity."
September 30th -
Five o'clock Devotional Service.
6:00 -Fellowship Supper.
7:30 - Student discussion.
The Fellowship Of
Liberal Religion
State and Huron Streets

A REAL SCOOP!

Never before have the students been able to receive the attentiot
and service we are able to offer them in all musical lines. I
the Ann Arbor store does not carry the article, the Detroit offic<
does and it takes only a few days to complete an order.
VICTROLA RECORDS - CLASSICAL AND POPULAR
MUSIC - PIANO RENTALS - RADIOS -
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

GRINNELL BROS.

116 South Main St.

Phone 7312

I- -i - III.___ _ _________

READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

,% ".

*

ATTENTION PROSPECTIVE PLEDGES!
Students who give in when they are wrong are
wise, but the one who gives in when he is right
is a pledge.
* * * *
A frosh at the University of Missouri on receipt
of a box from home wrote a note of appreciation.
"Dear Aunt Mary. Thanks for the cake. The
piece I got was fine."
* * * -
Nowhere will freshmen feel more at home than
in the University of California's Memorial Stadium
which was painted green during the summer
months.
, . * * * *
I will not vouch for the truthfulness of this
article but the story came to me about a fresh-
man at the University of Kentucky who signed
up for a language -class and attended a geology
class for two weeks before discovering it was
not his German section.
* * * *
The average college fraternity man spends some-
thing like 10 times as much on fraternity ex-
penses, cigarettes, candy, movies and dates as he
does on textbooks, the National Association of
Teachers of Marketing has discovered. And with
a little more perseverance it should be possible
to eliminate the last item altogether.
* * * *
Frosh customs, including the wearing of "pots"
=has been revived at the University of California
fby so-called spirited upper class groups. Under the
new order of things, "Co-operation - not en-
forcement," the vigilance committee will have
no authority to punish offenders but will report
"unsocial"men to sports, activities, class, and fra-
ternity heads, "who may act as they see fit."
Wasington
Off The Record
EDITOR'S NOTE: The author of this column is a
University of Michigan graduate who has done news-
paper work in Ohio, Oklahoma, New York, and Wash-
ington, D.C. She gathers material for her column,
which will appear on this page from time to time, in
the daily round of the Capitol reporter.
By SIGRID ARNE
RAYMOND MOLEY, who used to be known as
"Brain Truster No. One," slips in and out of
town so unobtrusively that his visits often pass
unnoticed.
But one sure way of finding him is to search
the Cosmos Club at lunch time. There he usually
is found with Under-Secretary Rexford Tugwell of
agriculture, present "Brain Truster No. One."
Their presence recalls a favorite Washington
story, which goes: "There are only three clubs
here - the Cosmos Club,- where men with lots
of brains and no money belong; the So-and-So
Club where men with no brains and lots of money
belong; and the This-and-That Club where - well,
you figure it out."
When Washington's ambitious building program
is , completed, historic Pennsylvania Avenue -
street of many notable parades - is scheduled to
relinquish its prominence to the new and hand-
some Constitution Avenue which is emerging from
the confused building operations.
In years past, Constitution Avenue was a canal
running through the capital. An old canal house
still stands on one corner.
THE YOUNGER Washington crowd is enjoying
some laughs at the expense of the pretty and
popular Helen Defrees, daughter of the comman-
dant of the navy yard.
She is afraid of only one thing - thunderstorms.
One terrfic storm struck as she was entertain-
ing a caller in the parlor of the commandant's
home.
Without a word of explanation Miss Defrees
arabbed a sofa nillow. nulled it over her head

CHORAL
UNION

CONCERTS

HILL AUDITORIUM

ANN ARBOR

See

it

Metropolitan Opera Association
Nov. iLAWRENETBET
Metropolitan Opera Association
Nov. 19-DONCOSSACK RUSSIAN
MALE CHORUS
SERGE JAROFF, Conductor
Consisting of 36 expatriated officers from the Imperial Army in
a program of Russian Church music, folk songs and soldier songs.
Dec. 3-josef Szigetil
"Hungary's greatest Violinist"
Dec. 1-BOSTO N SYMPHONY
ORCH ESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
More than 100 players.
Jan. 25-LOTTE LEHMANN,
Metropolitan Opera Association
Feb. 12-ose Iturbi,
Distinguished Spanish Pianist
Feb. 20-GORDON STRING
QUARTET
JACQUES GORDON, First Violinist
RALPH SILVERMAN, Second Violinist
PAUL ROBYN, Viola
NAOUM BENDITZKY, Cellist
Mar. 4-ARTUR SCHNABEL,
Eminent German Pianist

Give Us More Women!
There is a woman at the beginning of all great
things, says Lamartine, but if that philosophic
gentleman had lived to see the University of Illinois
campus at registration time he would -have
amended his statement to read "There is a dearth
of women at the beginning of some great things,
Alas, alas!"
The University of Illinois- has sought for years
by means of its publicity department and otherwise
to bring worthy students under its academic wings.
But in this effort there has been, so far as we
can see, no attempt to equalize the newcomers on
the basis of sex. And the ratio remains, sadly
enough, about 2.86 males to 1 female. (We saw the
.86 running around here yesterday.)
This improper balance of the sexes has dire so-
cial consequences. First, ittends to make the one
female, whatever be her physical aspects, much
dated and inclined to be snooty toward the 2.86
males. Second, it deadens the academic life of
the faculty. A professor has a hard time getting a
grade A line-up of feminine attributes in the front
row of his class-room. The first consequence is
by far the most disheartening.
The element of competition must be introduced
into feminine social life at the University. Other-
wise we turn out a pack of female snobs, entirely
too conceited about their degree of popularity.
There just aren't enough women to go= around,
and the incoming freshman class isn't helping the
ratio much.
We would like to poinit out to the University ad-
ministration that while women.are not necessary
during our four-year sojourn here, they are very
nice ornaments to have around. It does not lie in

MAr. 28-CLEVELAND SYMPHONY
ORCH ESTRA
AnRUR RODZINSKJ, Conductor

SEASON TICKETS

(including $3.00 May Festival coupon)i may be ordered by mail.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan