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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1935 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-01-20

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TiHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY X0, 1

i

PROPOSED STUDENT GOVERNMENT PLANS

Union Plan

I. MEMBERSHIP
Managing Editor of Daily
Pres. of Michigan Union
Pres. of Interfraternity Council
Pres. of Student Christian

Association
Student Rep.
of Ath.
Vice-Pres. of
of Lit.
Vice-Pres. of
of Eng.
Vice-Pres. 'of
School
Vice-Pres. of
School

from Bd. in Cn.
Union from Col.
Union from Col.
Union from Law
Union from Md.

10. Vice-Pres. of Union from Dent.
School
11. Vice-Pres. of Union from
Comb. Depts.
Whenever the independent or
fraternity groups have less than
two members, the Council shall
elect a sufficient number of men so
that there will be at least two in-
dependents and two fraternity men
on the body.
II. OFFICERS
The officers shall be Presiding
Officer and an Executive Secretary.
The President of the Michigan
Union shall be ex-officio the Pre-
siding Officer of the Council.
The Executive Secretary shall be
elected by the' Council, and, if not
a member of the Counci, snall be-
come a member upon election. He
must be an undergraduate of jun-
ior or senior standing. A junior
elected to this position shall be
eligible for re-election in his sen-
ior year. It shall be the duty of the
Executive Secretary to take active
charge of the Council's business,
to serve as a means of communica-
tion with other bodies, and to
serve as the representative of the
Council in all matters, unless
otherwise provided by action of the
Council.
III. JURISDICTION
This council shall have original
and general jurisdiction over all
men's student activities and stu-
dent conduct, and may make
recommendations on scholastic
matters. The jurisdiction now exer-
cised by University authorities in
this field is suspended upon the
adoption of this constitution; it is
provided, however, that all the
rules and regulations pertaining to
matters under the jurisdiction of
this council are to remain in full
force and effect until amended
or abolished by this council.

Alternate Plan
I. MEMBERSHIP
1. Managing Editor of Daily
2. Pres. of Michigan Union
3. Pres. of Interfraternity Council
4. Pres. of Engineering Council
5. Pres. of Tau Beta Pi
6. Pres. Jr. Lit. Class
7. Pres. Jr. Eng. Class
8. Ex-Pres. Jr. Lit. Class
9. Ex-Pres. Jr. Eng. Class
10. Pres. of Student Christian As-
sociation
11. Jr. Student Rep, from Bd. in
Cn. of Ath.
12. Sec. of Michigan Union
13. Drum Major of Band
14. Rep. of Col. of Arch.
15. Rep, of Law School
16. Rep. of Med. School
17. Rep. of Dent. School
18. Pres. of Michigamua
Whenever the independent or
fraternity groups have less than
two members, the Council shall
elect a sufficient number of men
so that there will be at least
two independents and two frat-
ernity men on the body.
The representative from the Col-
lege of Architecture shall be chosen
by vote of the male members of
the student body in that college,
from two candidates nominated by
the faculty of the College. Candi-
dates must be members of the jun-
ior or senior class.
The representatives from the
Schools of Law, Medicine and
Dentistry shall be chosen in a
manner similar to that used in se-
lecting the representative from the
College of Architecture.
II. OFFICERS
The officers shall be a President,
a Vice-President and a Secretary-
Treasurer. '
The President shall be elected by
the Council either from within its
own membership or from the
Campus at large. If he is not al-
ready a member of the Council he
shall become so upon election.
The Vice-President shall be
elected by the Council from with-
in its own membership.
The Secretary of the Michigan
Union shall be ex-officio the Sec-
retary-Treasurer of the Council.
Executive Committee-President,
Vice-President and Secretary of
Council, and two other members
appointed by the President.
III. JURISDICTION
This council shall have the pow-
er to make, in pursuance of gen-
eral University policy, all rules
relative to men students. It shall
also have general jurisdiction over
all student activities and conduct,
and the power of recommendation
on scholastic matters.

S.C.A. Plan
I. MEMBERSHIP
The Council shall be composed
of 15 members. They shall be the
Managing Editor of the Daily, the
president of the Interfraternity
Council, the president of the Mich-
igan Union, the president of the
S.C.A., the president of the senior
class of the Literary School, the
president of the Engineering Coun-
cil, the editor of the Michigan Law
Review, and an elected representa-
tive of the Combined Schools of
Medicine and Dentistry, as well as
that of the Graduate School. In
addition to these nine there shall
be six elected members. These
members will obtain their status
through having the organization
they represent petition the Men's
Council to have their name placed
on the ballot. They will be voted
on, in a general campus election,
under the proportional representa-
tion plan. This will allow any
minority organization, with a con-
stituency, to seat a member. The
election will be conducted by the
appointed members of the council.
Whenever the Independenthor
Fraternity groups have less than
two members, the Council shall
elect a sufficient number of men
so there will be at the least two
independent and two fraternity
men on that body.
II. OFFICERS
The presiding offier of the coun-
cil shall be elected from within the
group of council 'members. He
must be of Junior or Senior stand-
ing. Juniors elected shall be eli-
gible for re-election. A recording
secretary shall also be elected. It
will be the duty of the presiding
officer to take active charge of the
council's business and serve as the
representative of the Council on
all matters, unless otherwise pro-
vided by the council.
III: JURISDICTION
The Council shall have original
and general jurisdiction over all
men's student activities and stu-
dent conduct and may make
recommendations on scholastic
matters. The jurisdiction now ex-
ercised by University authorities in
this field is suspended upon the
adoption of this constitution; it is
provided, however, that all rules
and regulations pertaining to mat-
ter under the jurisdiction of this
Council are to remain in full force
and effect until amended or abol-
ished by the Council.

N.S.L. Plan
1. MEMBERSHIP
The Council shall be composed
of the president of the Michigan
Union, the president of the Student
Christian Association, the editor of
The Michigan Daily, the president
of the Michigan League and 25
representatives of the men and
women students, elected by the
student body according to a sys-
tem of proportional representation.
Any group of students desirous
of representation on the Council
shall meet and nominate a full
slate of 25 candidates. Nineteen
of this number shall be general
University candidates (from any
college), while six shall be desig-
nated as specific college candi-
dates: one each from the Colleges
of Literature, Science and the
A r ts, Engineering, Combined
Schools, Medicine, Law, and Grad-
uate Study.
To qualify a slate of students for
a place on the election ballot, a
petition of endorsement, signed by
200 students shall be necessary.
Each party shall also be required
to draw up a program of aims and
purposes, such program to be pub-
lished in The Michigan Daily at
least a week before election.
A vote shall be cast for one of
the slates on the ballot. The voter
shall have the privilege of indicat-
ing not more than five preferences
within the party's slate of nineteen
general University candidates .
Each party's vote shall be repre-
sented on the Council in propor-
tion to the total vote cast.
The slate with the highest vote
in a specific college shall automat-
ically include its designated dele-
gate for this college in its Council
quota.
Once the elected specific col-
lege delegates have been included
in a slate's quota, the remainder of
this quota shall be filled from its
general University candidates
(chosen as before described).
II. OFFICERS
The officers of this council shall
consist of a president, vice-presi-
dent, and secretary, elected by the
Council membership which will
likewise elect all committees.
III. JURISDICTION
The Council shall have original
and general jurisdiction over all
student activities and student con-
duct and may make recommenda-
tions on scholastic matters. It is
provided that all rules and regu-
lations pertaining to matters un-
der the jurisdiction of this Council
are to remain in full force and ef-
fect until amended or abolished by
the Council.

Hilty Declares
Students Must
C hoos e Plan,
All Proposals Provided For
Student Jurisdiction I
Some Measure
(Continued from Page 1)
vailing, it may deem it necessary to
disregard any such criticisms and to
take a larger measure of control over
matters which may have been con-
sidered in the past as subjects pri-
marily for undergraduate regulation,
Hilty stated.
Criticism is explained
The reason that there has been
so much criticism of the student
councils in past years - criticisms
of its lack of standing, its inactivity,
and apparent uselessness - may well
be due to the fact that it has not
employed its full measure of control
in these fields, he said.
IILetters have been sent to fraternity
house presidents and presidents of
campus organizations and will be pro-
vided for independents at the S.C.A.
requesting that their criticisms an'
opinions of their organizations should
be in the hands of the Undergrad-
uate Council by Wednesday.
Asks For Criticism
Plans need not be accepted "en
toto," it being entirely possible to
take separate provisions from each
of the plans submited, Hilty explained.
Hilty also stated that any organiza-
tion which had not received their
questionnaire might do so by com-
municating with him.
The results of the survey will be
used by the Council in the formation
of a new form of men's student gov-
ernment and will then submit it with
its recommendations to the Senate
Committee on Student Affairs. Its re-
port must be with the committee by
Feb. 1.
Burkhart Death Is
Termed As Suicide
No inquest will be held in the
death of Lewis Burkhart, 54, a farmer
of Freedom Township who took his
own life shortly after 6 p.m. Friday
night. Death by suicide because of
despondency was the finding of
Washtenaw County Coroner Edwin
C. Ganzhorn.
According to the deputy sheriff
who investigated the case, Burkhart
went out into the yard near the
house and shot a .22 calibre bullet
through his heart. Death was prac-
tically instantaneous.
Dr. Ganzhorn said that Burkhart
was probably suffering from despon-
dency as a result of an accident two
years ago in which his skull was frac-
tured. He had never recovered full'
health, and had been in a mental de-
pression ever since.
Burkhart had been a farmer in
Freedom Township for a number of
years, but recently because of his ill
health and scarcity of employment
had been unable to work. At the time
of his death he was living with his
brother, Charles Burkhart.

Trick Photography
Is Chief Feature
Of NewGargoyle
If the prospect of examinations is
causing you psychological distur-
bances, you'll fin your nightmares
expressed in the trick photography
appearinguon the cover of the Feb-
ruary issue of the Gargoyle, whi'
will go on sale Wednesday, it wa
announced last night by Eric W.
Hall, '35, managing editor.
Another novel feature of the Gar-
goyle will be a story on the Universi-
ty of Michigan Glider club. The
Dean of Women in caricature will
also *be presented.
Like every other campus organi-
zation, the Gargoyle has its own pros
posal for the solution of the prob-
lem of men's student government,
and a conversation between Dean
Joseph A. Bursley and a prominent
authority will present the embdi-
ment of the Gargoyle plan for re-
form.
As usual, another preposterous
person will be shown at his favorite
pastime, and five prominent co-eds
will appear in "Sophisticated Lady
modeling J-Hop house party outfits.
A prize-winning short story, "Mas-
querade," by Hart Schaaf, who won
the contest for the Octobee issue,
will also appear.
Requests Different Type
Of News From Colleges
West Lafayette, Ind. (Big Ten) -
A direct appeal to universities to
supply the press with "those aspects
of their activities which enter nec-
essarily into the beginnings, sustain-
ing, or comfort and security of the
lives of the people" instead of the
usual run of publicity on facts about
scientific research, was expressed in
an article featured by the January
issue of the Purdue Alumnus. The
article is entitled "Interpretation of
the University Through the Press,"
and was written by S. Emery Thom-
ason, who is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan and is new pub-
lisher of the Chicago News. .
He continues, "Universities a r e
seeking an interpreter who under-
stands the lives, the purposes, the
interests, and the language of both
the university and the public." He
maintains that until the universities
supply the press with stories which
the newspapermen, as well as th
public." He maintains that until the
universities supply the press with
stories which the newspapermen, as
well as the public, understand, the
general public will never be able to
make use of the repositories of
knowledge centered at universities
and which the people can -use to an
advantage.
EXPERT PRINTING
Programs. Bids, Evps., Letterheads
Our Prices are never high
The ATHENS PRESS
206 N. Main - Downtown
(Next to Postoffice )

Prof. R. B. Hall To Direct Degree
Proorai In Oriental Civilization8
R: lizing that the present trend this program of study, headed by
of -interest in foreign affairs "is to- Professor Hall, decided to formulate
ward the East rather than toward it because they felt the need of stu-
the Western world," the literary col- dents in the University for such a
lege is offering a recently organized program. In commenting on the use-
course in subjects which form a de- fulness of the degree program in
gr ee program in Oriental civilization, Oriental civilizations, Professor Hall
according to Prof. R. B. Hall. of the I said that the attengtion of the world
Geography department. is now directed toward the Orient
Those students who wish to con- and tho affairs of Japan and China,
centratc in this field of knowledgz a condition which did not exist a
during the last two years of theirI few years ago.
undergraduate course will now have The reali tion of the growing im-
an excellent opportunity, Professor portance in world affairs of these
Hall said. T ho s e interested inland other Oriental countries is
political science or in entering the stronger than ever, and the Degree
diplomatic service, and also those Program is designed to acquaint the
who wish it merely for a cultural student more closely with the facts
background will find this program behind the situation and to help him
unusually full of possibilities, he interpret the trends manifested.
stated. I The University of Michigan, Pro-
The committee which organized fessor Hall continued, has at present

more contacts with Eastern countries Turkey. In the Phillipine Islands, Dr.
than has any other university in the Steer and Dean Wooster were out-
country. Through many years ex- ; standing, the latter having been
perience in foreign fields, particu- Governor-General and an authority
larly in China, Japan, and the Phil- on the Islands, and about which he
ippines, University graduates have wrote a book.
established what amounts to almost Tells Taft Anecdote
a tradition of good service. ( It is told about Mr. Taft that when
Perhaps the most noted man from he was Governor-General of the
from Michigan to engage in these Philippines his cabinet there was
Michigan to engage in these activi- composed entirely o f Michigan
ties was President Angell, who was graduates, so when he called a meet-
ambassador to China, and later to, ing he opened it by saying, "The

meeting of Michigan alumni will
now come to order."
The present Governor-General is
a Michigan graduate, and Professor
J. L. Hayden of the Political Science
Department is in the East.

I '1

li;

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This new store is for your convenience. We will,
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11

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