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January 16, 1935 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-01-16

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1935

ElectionProbing
Committee H as
Broader Power;
Will Question Recount Of
Election For Secretary
Of State
Investigation Startedr
Six Republicans, Three
Democrats Make Up The
Group

LANSING, Jan. 15.- (-- Mich-I
igan's unprecedented election return
battle reached another spectacular{
stage today as a committee of nine
state senators -six Republicans and
three Democrats prepared to plunge
into an investigation of the recount
for the office of secretary of state
conducted by a special committee of
the special election recount session of
the last Legislature.
The Senate, in cession Monday
night, voted, 20-7, in support of a
i c.slution authorizing the investiga-
tion which was introduced-by Senator
L, Hale Brake, Republican of Stan-
ton.
The ground work for the inquiry
was swiftly laid. Lieut Gov. ThomasI
named the members of the commit-
tee : Chairman, Andrew L. Moore,
Pontiac; Ed. W. Fehling, St. John's;
Brake; Gerald D. Cotter, Mt. Pleas-
ant; Gordon F. Van Eeneenaam, Mus-
kegon, and Joseph F. Baldwin, Al-
bion, all Republicans, and threej
Democrats: John C. Wickstrom, Nor-I
way; Leon D. Case, Watervliet; and
Denias Dawe, Monroe.
Senator Fehling, who was desig-
nated as temporary chairman until
Chairman Moore recovers from in-j
juries suffered in an automobile re-
cently, immediately announced that
the committee would convene at .9
a.m. Wednesday in the senate cham-
ber.
Attofney,. General Harry S. Toy,
who in a report to the legislature
earlier in the everiing, asserted that
a "gigantic fraud" had been perpe-
trated on the voters of Michigan in
the recount of votes in Wayne coun-
ty, was appointed as counsel for the
senatorial investigators.
Armed under the resolution with
broad powers - to examine ballot
boxes, to subpena witnesses and to
take any other action it deemed nec-i
essary - and with a $3,500 appro-
priation to accomplish its purposes,'
the committee was ready to go intoj
action.
Attorney General Toy dispatched
approximately 20 subpenas to Pon-
tiac f for the signature of Chairman
More of the senate recount investi-
gaiion committee. Toy said that I. A.
Capizzi and Chester P. O'Hara, two
of his assistants who have been con-
d ing- the investigation of the
t ;. c county recount for his office,
will do most of the legal work in con-
ncction with the investigation.
A rercolution extending the scope
of a senate recount investigation
comrittee to other points of the state
outside of Wayne county will be in-
t- cduced in the house, according to
Ener B. O'Hara, chairman of the
Democratic state central committee.
PASADENA, Calif., Jan. 15 -(A)-
A mountain without roots, whose head
is of more ancient material than its
body, has been found by earthquake
investigators some 60 miles northwest
of Los Angeles.

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S. (. A. Plan For Student Government
(Contn ued from Past a
ARTICLE III.
Sec. '. The Council may either pass upon or submit petitions
of the student body to the University Administration with its recom-
meiidations or bring the issue contained in such petitions hefore the
stud-nt boly in an all-campus vote. A 5 per cent group of the male
iwminhcrs of th? tudent body will have to sign such petitions before
action can be taken.
Se-. 2. The above described election shall be held within 3
w -ks after the submission of petitions. Twenty per cent of the
m- '4rntaers of the student body must vote to force action on the
part of the men's Council.
ARTICLE IV.
S. . M ters before this Council may be refe-red to ihe
stn- nt body in a campus election unon the concurrence of two-thirds.
(10) of the inemers of this Council.
-c. 2. The power of the council allows them to amend th s
coIsIttiion if th-:ce-fourths of the memhers vote approval. Such
a i -tn'lmdmlnt must be voted upon within two weeks after proposal
av-I cin not be voted upon until submitted one week before the voting
s'ssio4?. The petitioning process, described in Article III, will allow
mci of the student body to oronose an amendment.
ARTICLE V.
Spc. 1. Ten members present shall constitute a recognized
group comipetent to pass on any of the Council's business whether
legisi-tive or judicial.
Se-, 2. A majority vote will decide all questions before this
Gody, other than those exceptions provided for in the constitution.
ARTICLE VI.
Scz. 1. The first president of the Council shall be the person
who s rved as president of the former Undergraduate Council dur-
ing the year 1934-35.
ARTICLE VII.
Sec. 1. Whenever the independents or fraternity groups have
less than two members, the Council shall elect a sufficient number
of men so that there will be at the least two independent and two
fraternity men on the body.
Sec. 2. The officers of the Council shall prepare, at the end
of their term of office, a printed bulletin accounting for their stew-
ardship of the year.
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New Orleans
Pay Is Tied Up
ByHuey Lone
City Funds Are Stoppedl
By State Court Order Of
The Kingfish
NEW ORLEANS, Jan. 15 - P) -
A payless payday confronted all New
Orleans city employes today because
cf the controversy between Mayor
T. Semmes Walmsley and Senator
Huey P. Long.
Mayor Walmsley, blaming the fi-
nancial crisis on the "unprecedented
judicial procedure" of Long's govern-j
ment in obtaining a state court order
tieing up city funds. appealed to the
United States court for protection.
Under an act of Congress passedj
last year, Walmsley took the finan-
cial situation yesterday into Federal
District Court, which immediatelyI
prohibited the state from proceeding
against the city today.
Walmsley said most of the city
employes, scheduled to miss payj
checks today, had not been paid
since Dec. 23 last year, and called
upon business to pay license taxes im-
mediately.
As the tangle over New Orleans
funds became more confused, the
Square Deal Association, organized
in Baton Rouge to fight Long's dic-
tatorship, was spreading into the
country parishes.
Local "companies" were organized
last night at Derriday, in Concordiaj
Parish; at Clinton, in East Feliciana
Parish, and Bunkie, in Avoyelles Par-
ish.
Banks, to which the city said it
was indebted to the extent of $6,000,-.
000, joined in the city petition to Fed-
eral Court.
Walmsley said the Federal statuteI
"provides that a plan may be entered
into between a municipality and its
creditors that would permit the mun-
icipality to pay all of its creditors
out of any plan of financing that is
agreed to by a large majority of the
creditors, subject to the approval of
the United States courts."
He said it was "in no sense a bank-
ruptcy proceeding" and did not affect
the bonded indebtedness of the city.
TROOPS MAY GUARD NEGRO
(IT MUV T,ANTT f' 1 V.L.LIJ. CCJ, .n 1 .L-J \"1-

Built Kidnap Ladder State Dentists
.. "I ToVisit Dental
y" .School Clinics
More than 500 dentists from all
over Michigan will come to Ann Ar-
bor Jan. 25 to take part in the an-
nual "Homecoming Clinic," it was
ianounced yesterday by Dr. Chalmers
W. Lyon, chairman of the dental
school executive committee.
These clinics have become a fea-
ture of the postgraduate education
Qrceram of the dental sc"iool, Dr.
Chalmers pointed out, and stated that
invitations to it have gone out to
dentists all over the state.
The clinic will be the climax of the
single day clinics which have been
attended by nearly 55 dentists each
month of the past year. These den-
tists, selected in groups from various
:,arts of the state, have the opportun-
ity at the "Homecoming Clinic" to
review all that has taken place
throughout the year and discuss 're-
cent developments in dentistry with
p refessors here.
More than 400 dentists responded
-Associated Press Photo. to the clinic opportunity last year,
The New York American in a copy- and Dr. Lyon declares there has been
righted story said Abe Samuelsohn an increasing interest shown by doc-
(above), carpenter of the Bronx, New tors throughout the state. Officials
York, had informed authorities he in charge of postgraduate instruction
built the Lindbergh kidnap ladder at praised the work and expressed the
the request of Bruno Hauptmann. hope that instruction may soon be
given in various parts of the state, as
is now being done in the field of medi-
i i i Bat cine.
. I aL(litor o (Address
(By Big Ten Press Service) Enoineeri yo Body
URBANA, Jan. 15- The Univer-
sity of Illinois Interfraternity Council Sidney Kirkpatrick, editor of the
ruled this week that the practice of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineer-
breaking pledges for the purpose of ing Magazine, will speak at 7:30 p.m
raising house averages will no longer Thursday before the meeting of the
be permitted. student branch of the American So-
Jan. 9 was set as the final date on ciety for Chemical Engineers in room
which pledges might be broken. As 1042 East Engineering Building.
a result, 16 pledges were broken by Mr. Kirkpatrick will speak on the
8 houses. None of these men may be subject: "Trends in the Chemical En-
repledged until next semester. gineering Industries and Professions."
Included in this ruling is the order All interested are invited to attend,
that a boy must move out of the and refreshments will be served after
house upon breaking his pledge.- the meeting.
SECRETARIAL and
BUSINESSTRAINING
For the past twenty years Michigan students have supplemented
their education with our practical training.
NEW CLASSES NOW FORMING
1AMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William Sts. Phone 7831

THE FAME OF MICHIGAN IN
SCHOLARSHIP AND SPORTS IS
MATCHED BY MICHIGAN'S EX-
ACTING REQUIREMENTS IN MAT-
TERS OF ATTIRE - THERE THE
INVISIBLE SEAMLINE CLOSURE,
KOVER-ZIP, IS PREFERRED FOR
ALL TYPES OF APPAREL.
Ann Arbor tailors, like outstand-
ing college tailors nation-wide
who are arbiters of style, endorse
Kover-Zip as the only slide fas-

A1

SW alton Spins Yarns UOtarly
Day Sailors On Great Lakes{
Ghosts of phantom ships, squalls of in Lake Huron rose. causing much
untold fury, tiger fish waiting to damage to shore cities, and finally z
gobble up young sailors, boats high in burst through with a flood that took
the air with their smoke-stacks point- all the stranded vessels down to Lake
ing downward, and -secret treasuresE .
at the bottom of the lakes, were some He cited stories of ghosts of ships
of the stories of Great Lakes sailor- looming on the horizon. "On calm
folk lore unfolded .by Prof. Ivan H. evenings," he said to give an ekample,'
Walton of the engineering college in "when a storm is brewing, LaSalle's
his talk at 2 p.m. yesterday in the Griffon' has been sighted skirtingt
"Michigan, My Michigan" series over the north shore of Lake Michigan. The
Station WJR,. - 'Tady Elgin' which was rammed and
During the last few years, Profes- sunk with a loss of nearly 400 lives has
sorWalon as isied anyforerbeen seen steaming along to the
schoonermen and their immediate suhado h aelk.
families over much of the Great Lakes According to Professor Walton, sail-
region and has otained "yarns" which, ors' superstitions mostly deal with bad
as he says, "stirs the imagination of. omens. A cross-eyed sailor aboard
even the most prosaic of us." mace the vessel hard to steer. A corpse
brought certain disaster. Ships and
He told that he spoe with men crews which began their season on
still living in lake ports, who began Friday were certain to come to grief.'
sailing when twelve years of age or, Should a vessel stick on the ways while
le,-. and who will tell of listening being launched, she had a bad future.
wild-eyed to tales of vessels myster- Whistling would bring bad headl
iously disappearing with all hands, of winds. Rats leaving the boat was a
being sucked down beneath the sur- sure sign of approaching disaster.
Face by great whirlpools, or even
through underground channels from
cue lake to another.
Teni tB tnyanthe proaigious folk
hero of North Michigan l;nmbermen. .
izovidcdmneny other tales. less dire in
K..Cah sive . Zpngteflwo
aiUe, atd ProfsoessWalton. "LHe
-;-ild at time _s take e normxous r aftsk
f log. dn the I. rakes and cause
Lt s zrds to n v.gction , ho.ld d
ms;c unaou o-fce of thes.e rafts
iget caught in is wake its chances
f survivalnnt were less than nthing.
Paultoe his cra ft with a line from
en to 20 feet in diameter from a
-anoe which he paddled. On one oa ca-
;ion one of his rafts jammed in the
tt zkli R~e. stppng the +_o flow of
a~te, a unrd of vessels in Lake
3t. Clair..and il he DUtroit River were

tener fit for fine custom clothes.
. d4
famous Ann Arbor tailors, say-"Kover-
Zip, the hidden zipper, replaced the
earlier exposed zipper on all our trou-
sers and slacks... a practical and re-
fined fly, greatly improved over the
uncovered zipper."
0 0 .
There is a marked preference
among "best-dressed" college
seniors for Kover-Zip, it is first
choice for everything from eve-
ning clothes to slacks.
DON ROGERS
Dartmouth, 1935
"The uncovered metal
of the ordinary slide4
fastener has kept it
from being adopted
for fine clothing.
Kover-Zip eliminates
this, it is the ideal
closure."
LOU DUBER
Ohio State, 1935
"The college man who
is well-dressed wears
a zipper fly-not the
ordinary exposed zip-
per but Kover-Zipi
gives him a better
appearance."
WALDES KOH-I-NOOR, INC.
LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK
Read The Classifieds
ga

Troops may stand guard during the
trial next month of Alonzo Robinson,
alias James H. Coyner, a Negro
charged with slaying Mr. and Mrs. A.
Turner.
EXPERT PRINTING
Progrlins. Bids;.Fvps., etterheads,
Our Pr icesa arnever high
The ATHENS PRESS
20. Main t Dwnt wn
(Next'to Postc dice}

Starting
TOMORROW-
fo- THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY

January 17

J!anuary 18

January 19

WARD'S
FEBRUARY
FURNITURE
SALE
and SALES for the HOME

TODAY

- Watch for WARDS big
six-page circular to be

delivered to your door.
If you do not receive one
today, phone 2-3196.

11

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