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January 13, 1935 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1935-01-13

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E FOUR

THE -MICHIAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13,

WAWA"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i t

Publii ed every 'morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
1934 Gre 1g 1935 -
Mi~ttated (WuScttSINtM
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mall,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 4nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925,
MANAGING EDITOR..............WILLIAM G.FERRIS
CITY EDITOR .............. .JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ............RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ....................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty,
Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Mac-
donald, John. M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florete Harper, Eleanor Johnson. Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, -Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown. Clinton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
G. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd. Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert -Pulver, Lloyd S. ,Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard' Weissman, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
inond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
Dorothy- Briscoe, Florence Davies, Helen Diefendorf,
Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin,
Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Rueger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.,
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER....... ......RUSSELL B. READ
CRE'DIT MANAGER:... .. . .... ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department. Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,t
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder. Margaretta
Kollig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernadine
Field, Betty Bowman, Judy Trosper, Marjorie Langen-
derfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
1A1ie

Action Toward
Judicial Reform.. .
T HE RECENT ACTION of the De-
troit Bar Association in going on
record as favoring the appointive system of choos-
ing judges for state courts as well as others is the
first step of what should be a sustained drive until
their aim is achieved.
The need for some change from the present
system of electing men to preside over our courts
of justice has long been felt by people who have
given any thought to the problem. The inertia of
the great majority of the people of the state has
been a big factor in delaying systematic action to
do away with the grievance.
Members of the faculty of the Law School when
asked last year what could be done about chang-
ing the system, suggested the appointment of
judges for life tenure on book behavior by a non-
partisan commission headed by the governor of the
state and made up of the chief justice of the
state supreme court, leaders of bar associations and
others who could fill the necessary requirements
of the knowledge and non-partisanship which
Would be necessary on such a commission.
This plan, however, is not the only one which
could achieve the desired results. The plan itself
is not the most important thing in the work at
the present time. The people of the state must be
brough to realize that a change from the present
system is possible and can be easily accomplished
under competent leadership.
It is to be hoped that bar associations through-
out the state will follow Detroit's example, thus
providing leadership invaluable to such a move-
ment.
fAsOthers See It
Grading The Professors
4PROJECT WHICH has been under considera-
tion for some time by the Interfraternity
Scholarship Council -the student grading of pro-
fessors-comes to life in the action of a few
teachers in the College of Commerce.
The plan is not a new one on the campus, but
it deserves the consideration of all thoughtful
members of the student body and the administra-
tion staff.
No thoughtful person will deny that criticism -
constructive criticism - is a good thing. That this
criticism should come from those best qualified.
from actual experience, should not be denied by
anyone.
How often have we longed for the opportunity to
tell our teachers they were a revised version of
the slave drivers of pre-Civil War days; how often
have we expressed a desire to listen to an instruc-
tor who is fluent, forceful and broadminded; how
often have we wished that there was some way that
we as students could do something to make the lot
of students who follow us just a little better?
The answer to these and many other questions
can be found in the simple expedient now being
tried by a few teachers on the campus. The idea
has worked at other universities, and it can suc-
ceed here, if the start that has been made is fol-
lowed through.
That the answers obtained in these exams be
read only after the student's grade for the quarter
is in, seems only logical. We venture a guess, how-
ever, that the type of professor that has started
the plan as it now works would be capable of
taking the criticism in the spirit that it is given
and would not let it influence his grading.
Of course the cry of the narrow-minded and
the haughty will be that such a plan is impractical.
We believe, however, that if a man is so capable
that he can not accept criticism, he is wasting
his time as a teacher.
-Ohio State Lantern.
Putting It Up To Youth
THE NEW GENERATION may be "young" said
Edward A. Filene, noted writer on social and
economic questions, speaking before the N.S.F.A.
conference last week, but it is socially more mature
than the generation which preceded it, the gen-
eration which holds the reins at present. The
speaker declared his faith in the ability of tomor-
row's leaders to solve the great social problems

that loom ahead. Young people, he said, have the
"richest legacy" of mistakes to guide them that any
generation ever handed down to another.
If awareness of a situation and a record of
past blunders insured understanding of that insti-
tution, Mr. Filene's optimistic prophecy might be
more easily accepted. But history shows us people
making their favorite mistakes over and over and
over. And while today's young people may have
grown up in a social crisis, their awareness of prob-
lems unsolved insures neither understanding of the
forces at work nor ability to control them.
Glib prophecies of the younger generation's suc-
cess in dealing with its problems can have little
value in bringing about deeper study or more
careful thinking. The fact that crises confront us
is far from auguring our ability to meet them.
Too many people already are content to blunder
along in the old way, on the chance that things
will turn out all right. What youth needs is not
reassurance as to its ability, but a challenge to it.
University Daily Kansan.
Loan Offer To Fraternities
A SITUATION paralleling the Oklahoma land
rush in the old days will take place when the
full significane of the Federal loan plan for fra-
ternity and sorority house repair is realized by
the Trojan Greeks.
The majority of the 32 S.C. fraternity and soror-
ity houses are woefully shabby and disreputable.
Although the house managers and others in con-
trol are to be commended for not putting them-
selves deeply in debt by spending large sums on
rebuilding, the opportunity offered by the govern-
ment to borrow money at low rates with the Fed-!

COL LEG IATE
OBSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
The extent to which the depression has pro-
gressed is readily illustrated by the following ar-
ticle:
It seems that radical men stylists in the East
are suggesting the adoption of turkish towels as
scarves for college men, and furthermore these
are consequently being stocked in very gaudy colors
in anticipation of a large demand. At Boston Col-
lege, the masculine element has already become
addicted to the towel fad. Wearing these scarves,
they attend classes, escort their dates and attend
imporant social funcions just as if the style were
acceptable. No statistics are yet available on how
women regard the fad. Meanwhile, even on the
University of Illinois campus, where the men are
said to dress ultra-conservatively, these modern
scarves are beginning to appear draped around
the necks of progressive stylists.
A FRESHMAN'S IDEA OF-
College: A rosy four-year dream from which
one emerges with sufficient knowledge to conquer
the world.
The Faculty: Benevolent and learned persons
to whom St. Peter comes for advice.
Fraternities: College men bound together by high
ideals.
Scrorities: Bevies of beauties of culture and
charm..
Fraternity pins: Emblems of brotherly love.
Registrar's Office: Original abode of the Three
Wise Men.
Freshmen: Dumb and gullible creatures of great
wonderment.
A SENIOR'S IDEA OF-
College: Years spent in acquiring useless knowl-
edge.
Faculty: Large assortment of evil spirits who sit
up nights trying to think of ways to flunk students.
Fraternities: Convenient but expensive boarding
houses where the supply of socks holds out pretty
well.
Scrorities: Why mention this? Ugh.
Registrar's Office: Original abode of fiends in-
carnate, armed with horrors of the inquisition
and a huge pair of shears for slashing credits.
Freshmen: Naive and undisillusioned lambs,
much to be envied.
Here's an item coming from the University of
Washington Daily:
Northwestern will offer a marriage course, based
on a scientific and authoritative viewpoint as soon
as there is a demand for one. Similar courses are
being offered men at the University of Wisconsin,
at MICHIGAN, North Carolina and one is con-
templated at the University of Oregon.
That's news to us here at Michigan.
Two students at the University of Oklahoma
received a gift of a battery commander's tele-
scope which was originally intended to be used
for observing the bursting of shells from the
French 75 and Howitzers. These boys decided
to use it to observe the events in the infirmary.
One of the boys focused the instrument on
the girl's ward in -the infirmary, which of
course, brought the building closer.
"Ouch," he yelled.
"What's the matter," the other one asked.
"Oh nothing. One of the nurses closed the
window and I thought she caught the end of
my nose."
h ii

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Everyone enjoys the J-Hop because
it affords an opportunity for the so-
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perfect environment.
Colorful gorgeous arrays of gowns
and the latest in masculine style will
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A suggestion for that important
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The dazzling white purity of the formal
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Branches:
214 South State St.
1115 S. University

c Brothers
U_ WA

703 Packard St.
113 East Liberty
701 South State

NIGHT EDITOR: THOMAS E, GROEHN

s.,

What It Is And
What It Does . ..
HE DAY WHEN government was an
institute remote from the every-day
affairs of the average citizen has forever passed.
The time when the state university confined itself
to education of the state's young people has also
gone into limbo.
Today it is the ambition of the University ad-
ministration "to bring the University into every
home and every community for the benefit of the
people of Michigan," according to an official bul-
letin, "The University of Michigan -What It Is
and What It Does," now being distributed to per-
sons interested in the welfare of the school.
Today the University performs for the people of
the state at least 50-odd services - of which fur-
nishing higher education to young men and women
is only one, although still the first and greatest.
Medical and surgical aid to 30,000 persons a year
and dental service to 15,000 more are among the
most tangible contacts . between the University
and adult citizens, About 2,500 are annually en-
rolled in Extension Division courses outside of Ann
Arbor, and additional extension lectures are given
by faculty members in nearly 200 state cities and
towns.
The number of professional and special-interest
groups that meet in Ann Arbor every year for con-
ferences in conjunction with University faculty
members and students is legion. Included are such
diverse groups as pharmacists, manufacturers, ac-
couritants, college and high school teachers, tim-
berland owners and utilizers of forest products, and
highway engineers.
Out from Ann Arbor go daily .radio broadcasts,
carrying lectures by University experts and even
music lessons to thousands of regular listeners;
reading lists, clippings, and other printed material
through the work of the Library Extension Serv-
ice; useful bulletins for the benefit especially of
clubs and schools.
The department of engineering research, at the
expense of its clients, investigates fundamental
technical problems foi Industrial concerns and
manufacturers, giving them the advantage of the
University's personnel and equipment. Drinking
water from public water systems is analyzed by
the hygienic laboratory. University experts assisted
prominently in the land economic survey.
These and many other interesting facts present-
ed in this concise form in this new pamphlet are
necessarily sketchy, but they provide a convincing
case. Though few may remember that the Univer-
sity has received more benefactions than any

MARILYN SHOPPE_____

Washington
Off The Record

We've Scoured the New York Market for
J-I p o rmals and ra s

4-0

By SIGRID ARNE
(Associated Press Staff Writer)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12
PERCY LEE GASSAWAY, new representative
from Oklahoma, seems slated to be one of the
new "sights" in Washington.
He is a rancher, and likes his spurs and 10-
gallon hats. On a visit here he was a dinner guest
at one of the city's most hoity-toity night clubs.
Startled club habitues looked up as Glassaway
passed their tables, hispurs clinkingly loudly on the
floor as he walked.
The crack corps of telephone operators on
the capitol's switch-board handle 30,000 calls
a day.
Part of those calls are made locating mem-
bers of Congress for important votes. One
operator last session stopped a train in Phila-
delphia and had a senator put on a return
train in order to get him back for a close poll.
Rep. Bert Snell of New York, as leader of the
Republicans in the House, is in line for the speak-
ership if the tide swings back to his side of the
aisle.
But his friends assure him the signs are against
him - that his eyebrows aren't thick enough.
They point for precedent 1.: Garner, who was
speaker before he became vice-president, and
to Rep. Joe Byrns. new speaker.
Both have old-fashioned "bettling" eyebrows.
The musical fiavorites of the two Roosevelt
sons, Franklin, Jr., and John, are a mixture of
old and new. Their list, handed to an orchestra
leader for a White House party, included:
"Home on the Range," the President's favorite;
"The Continental," "Stars Fell on Alabama,"
"The Blue Danube," "You're the Top," "The
Merry Widow" and "Two Cigarettes in the
Dark."

Ui

Some are already here
And there will be daily
arrivals from now on
Our Usual Poptv
RICE

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SOPHISTICATED MODISHNES
GLO URIOU LS SPRING SHADE
B E AU T IFUL N EW P R IN
N EW L AC ES A ND N E

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WITH

JACKS

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As usual, it will be our
Pleasure to serve you for
this grand occasion as we
haue for the past 9 years

-IVAN

I

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