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January 11, 1935 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1935-01-11

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PAC

r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1934

TIF 3ICJJ.jGAN DAILY

'tir
Publizned every morning except Monday during the
tuniversity year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.I
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association1
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
Nsociated (Wolleointe ress
-= 934 ] 1U2iteJj1e f935
H4AW" WSCONSIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered atrthePost, Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matte,. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. -400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, 'Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR............JOHN HEALEY
EDTORIAL DIRECOR..........R.ALPH G.COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ....................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ......................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty,
Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H. -Kleene, David G. Mac-
donald, John M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown, Clinton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
G. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard Weissman, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
mond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
Dorothy Briscoe, Florence Davies, Helen Diefendorf,
Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selmna Levin,
Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Rueger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.'
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER ...................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Stmonids. :Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kollig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernadine
Field, Betty Bowman, Judy Trosper, Marjorie Langen-
derfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.

the petitions being circulated on the campus this
wcek, referring to the United States and the League
of Nations. We want to know who is behind the
n: ovment? Exactly what, in simple English, do'
he petitions ask for? And then, do we favor
joining the League? Will joining mean that each
recmote controversy wil involve us, perhaps, in
The answers.
The League of Nations Association, circulators
of the petitions, has for many years labored to
bring the United States into the League. It has
behind it respected public citizens (Nicholas Mur-
ray Butler, Newton D. Baker, George W. Wicker-
sham, and from Michigan the late G. Carl Huber
and Charles McKenny.) It was the thought of the
Association to bring upon the national administra-
tion the pressure of public opinion through these
petitions. The Association itself favors joining the
League unconditionally; but too many American
citizens, fearing this would mean marching off to
fight South American border disturbance, have
held back, and so the Association decided to word
the petitions very conservatively in order to show
a large number of signatures. The demands would
not be large, but would at least represent public
interest.
And so the petition was worded to ask two
things: first, that the government state upon
what conditions it would consider joining the
League - that is, conditions that would lend our
prestige to the League's peace efforts, and yet guar-
antee us immunity from being involved in purely
foreign disputes; secondly, that an official diplo-
matic representative be sent to participate in the
League deliberations. This is not, as some have
suggested, tantamount to joining. The -United
States has frequently in the past years partici-
pated through our ambassadors to France and
Switzerland, and through Norman H. Davis, am-
bassador-at-large. This representative would mere-
ly eliminate the indirectness of the contact between
our diplomatic office and such deliberations.
The requests are mild. They answer the objec-
tions of conservative citizens. They will indicate
positive public interest to the Congress wio will
soon consider the matter of our joining the World
Court, which movement, if the Senate does not
balk administration guidance, seems destined to
pass.
It is not our desire here to discuss the merits or
disadvantages that might accrue from joining the
League. We urge that your signature be appended
to the petition, or withheld, after due considera-
tion of the issue, rather than as a consequence of
apathetic indifference.
As Others See It
Exchange Of Professors
N ANONYMOUS WRITER in the Yale News
suggests that universities adopt a system of
exchanging professors for the mutual benefit of
students and learning. This writer - who is evi-
dently a teacher himself - points out that college
departments become inbred with stale beliefs in
their particular field of activity. And this accept-
ance of the dogma as laid down by the head of
the various departments causes faculty members
to work less at new solutions of old problems. They
become sterile, satisfied, and that satisfied atti-
tude is passed on to students. Satisfaction, though,
is fatal for progress In evolving new ideas.
Sterile teaching cliques would be dispersed by
exchanging professors. The writer says, "The pro-
fessors would be thrown into hostile territory."
In order to defend his beliefs the teacher would
be spurred into some active thinking when he
enters a school where there is another clique with
totally different beliefs. Students would be more
stimulated by these academic wars. But the best
influence would be upon the faculty.
Then, says the- Yale witer, "It might be no
longer possible as it is today to find teachers
of economics who had never heard the names
Wicksteed or Walras; under-consumptionists on
the faculty might be stirred a little from their
smug stupidity; sociologists could no longer ignore
Pareto because they were steeped in Sumnerian
dogma; last but far from ,least, English teachers
could not longer cover with descriptive pyro-
technics their ignorance of the critical approach."
And here at Pennsylvania we'd like to see some

differing opinion in the Wharton School on mone-
tary policies, and the psychology department have
an exchange professor who could air his faith in
the Gestalt theory and Freud's theories. But it's
not our purpose to make a list. We merely wish to
suggest the plan of exchanging professors for in-
tellectual stimulation and show the need of it.
There is a need, and we should have it filled.
-The Daily Pennsylvanian.
Worthwhile Class Politics
THE SENIOR CLASS administration, by its sin-
cerity of purpose in plunging into the work
confronting it shows that there is "something con-
structive" to be done. It has long been the com-
plaint that "all the classes do is to hold an an-
nual dance" and by the action of the seniors this
is definitely repudiated.
There is valuable work awaiting class officers.
All that is necessary is that the class take an active
interest in the problems of the university. The ad-
ministration of each class can win itself recog-
nition for the excellence of its social functions
or for the sincerity of its spirit in attacking matters
such as the public relations question, the owner-
ship of the Co-Op, and the needs of the financially
indigent student.
There is, for example, no reason why the junior
class directorate should not offer to assist the
seniors in the ambitious "selling the university to
the state" program of the latter~. It is all a matter
of individual class officers.
In this observation lies the answer to those
critics of class politics who excuse their lack of
interest in student elections by saying that they
are meaningless Of course. most class officers are

COL LEGIATE
OBSERVER

II:._

By BUD BERNARD

Here's a good squib coming from R.H.C.:
13 BAD LUCK LINES
No date.
Don't rate.
Flunking Ec.
Dumb-like.
Not high.
Too dry.
No money.
No honey.
Hate school.
Too cool.
No show.
New low.
Life's a gripe!
The coach of the Yale fencing team recently
objected to the marriage of his daughter to a New
Haven student on the grounds that the would-be
husband didn't know how to juggle the foils. TheI
dueling demon claimed that his sons were all fenc-
ing champions, his wife was a master of that art,
his daughters were all outstanding in their respec-
tive colleges, his grandson was a leading contender
for honors, and so were "his sisters, his cousins
and his aunts."
We've heard of many shotgun weddings, but
when an old man is so old-fashioned that a sword
is involved, we draw the line.
* * * *
This article below appeared in the Daily
Illini and is claimed to be true.
EVOLUTION - DRAMA IN THREE ACTS
WANTED: Position by-college graduate, 24,
Phi Beta Kappa, neat, gentlemanly, salary
X75 per week. Call J.S.F. Drake Hotel.
WANTED: Position by college graduate. Age
25. Will take anything. Salary no object. J.S.F.
Y-M.C.A.
WANTED: Man with capital to start em-
ployment agency with college graduate. Expert
in all lines Communicate with box 74,T.
* * * *
Love is a cure for an over-developed ego says a
professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College. "A
love affair," he declares, "is a powerful means of
rescuing the neurasthenic and sufferers from the
diseases of egoism."
It seems as though a certain geography pro-
fessor at the University of Oregon found occa-
sion to ask his pupils the following question:
"What is Mesopotamia noted for?"
"That's where we get our best dates," .W
the ready response of some intellectual.
"Maybe that's where you get yours, but that
doesn't hold for the rest of us," shot back the
alert professor with a lofty glance.
* * *
If Michigan recognizes the Little Brown Jug,
when we get it back, it will not be the fault of a
University of Minnesota sign painter. The battered
symbol of football supremacy is divided into halves,
and the sign painter is working on the Minnesota
half. Half of the neck and handle, formerly Mich-
igan colors are now being painted maroon. The
Minnesota half of the face also done in maize and
blue, is being done over in bright maroon. The
"M," formerly the Michigan block "M" is being
changed and finished in gold leaf. The painter is
not going to touch the Michigan side of the jug.
"Let Michigan take care of its own share of the
jug," he said.

The
CONTINENTAL
DINING. ROOMS
1220 South University, between Church and Forest
invited you to purchase
A MEAL TICKET
LUNCH and DINNER - SIX DAYS A WEEK
SUNDAY DINNER and SPECIAL SUNDAY
SUPPER $4.75
PATRONS MAY CHOOSE FROM MENUS
35c LUNCH and 45c SUPPER or 25c LUNCH and 55c DINNER
REMEMBER-
We use only the very best foods' Expensive quality-
Reasonable Prices-

CREATE
YOUR OWN FORTUNES
With the. 'UNIVERSAL
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Serving a la
and until

Carte till 12 Midnight Week Days
2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday

_ _ _ _ ''iI
- -..

JOHN BURKHART, Dist.
721 Brooks St. Phone 4766

- = 77

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For The
New VYear..
resolve to regularly attend
week-e~nd dances at the
UNION. The beautiful Un-
ion Ballroom, the gay at-
mosphere, and the Union
Band, all give you the finest
facilities for dancing that
may be found on the cam-
pus. Friday from 9 till
and Saturday from 9 till 12.

NIGHT EDITOR: DAVID G. MACDONALD

y~ .-"

College Students
Vote On War...
TUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
will this week be asked to co-oper-
ate with those of 150 other colleges throughout
the country in stating sincerely their attitudes
toward war and toward various peace efforts.
The nation-wide poll, which is probably the larg-
est survey in scope yet conducted on this subject,
is being sponsored by the Association of College
Editors in conjunction with the Literary Digest.
The magazine is sending out ballots to every col-
lege student by mail and will collect and tab-
ulate the totals, releasing them for ;publication in
college newspapers.
The questions, made as comprehensive and yet
as concise as possible for the purpose of crystal-
lizing opinion are not in every case easily answered
by a "Yes" or "No" vote, but they must be so
answered to give the poll a statistical value.
The complete ballot is as follows:
1. Do you believe that the United States
could stay out of another great war? (a) If the
borders of the United States were invaded
would you bear arms in defense of your coun-
try? (b) Would you bear arms for the United
States in the invasion of the borders of another
country?
2. Do you oelieve that a national policy of,
"an American navy and air force second to
none" is a sound method of insuring us against
being drawn into another great war?
3. Do you advocate government control of
armament and munition industries?
4. In alignment with our historic procedure
in drafting man-power in time of war, would
you advocate conscription of all resources of
capital and labor in order to control all profits
in time of war?
5. Should the United States enter the
League of Nations?
Of course the value of the poll will depend di-
rectly on the conscientiousness with which stu-
dents respond to the ballot. It is of vast import-
ance to the movement of peace that an accurate
idea of the opinion of college students, a group in
a position to understand and feel deeply about
these questions, should be gained.
Your Signature
And Public Opinion . ..
RYSTALLIZED PUBLIC OPINION
C is the powerful instrument which a
group of citizens are seeking to bring to bear on

Mic~ig~uUnion Balirooni1

I I

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Washington
Off The Record

... r r

By SIGRID ARNE
Associated Press Staff Writer)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.
T HE SOL BLOOM family of New York is one
of the capital's constant sources of good stories.
Representative Bloom, himself a wit, has a diffi-
cult time staying ahead of his wife and his daugh-
ter, Vera.
Just now Vera ranks high because of a recent
interview with Mussolini.
She asked Il Duce for an autographed photo-
graph which he gave her. Then she asked for an-
other.
"But you already have one," protested Mus-
solini.
"I know I have one," said Miss Bloom, "but so
have a lot of other people."
Mussolini grinned and signed the second picture.
Rush D. Holt, elected senator from West Virginia,
has been running into difficulties because of his
mere 29 years.
As a senator-elect, he had the privilege of riding
the senators' private elevator at the capitol. They
are summoned by three rings.
Holt rang three times the other day and then
gasped at the irate elevator operator who gave him
a word-lashing for presuming to ride in the sacred
lift. But Holt rode with a red-faced operator after
the necessary explanations.
"Ruthven," the home of Attorney-General j
Cummings, is famous for the collection of I
autog aphed pictures of Washingtonians which
he and his wife ("Colonel Pixie" to him) have
gathered.
Mrs. Cummings claims "jurisdiction" over
the pictures.
"You see, I own the Supreme Court, two
presidents and one first lady," she says.
A --rh- o rpfir VCVI r4,YrmR l in i P.vritten of

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