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December 21, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1934

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
anid the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
xociat~d (aUt~iate dres
- 1 9 3 4 1 9 3 5 - % 5
MasDSO?*WISCONSIN
"MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street; New York, N.Y. - 400 N. ]ichigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR ...........................JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ............RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ...................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David 'G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Par-
ker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John 11. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Clinton
B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Rich-
ard Hershey. Ralph W. Hurd, Fred W. Neal, Robert
Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Marshall Shulman, Donald
Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob C. Seidel, Bernard
Levick. George Andros, Fred Buesser, Robert Cummins,
Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Raymond Goodman.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein,
Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois
King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison,
Elsie.Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly
Solomon, Laura Winograd, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ...............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER .................ROBERT S. WARD'
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-.
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, "Cameron Hall; Circulation
anil National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.

Doing The
Impossible .. .
H ARVARD PSYCHOLOGISTS re-
cently reported that radio, as an
instrument of education, was definitely inferior to
the personal lecture or the printed page. Their re-
port said, "Radio has a somewhat dulling effect
on the higher mental processes of the listener. He
is definitely less critical, less analytical, more pas-
sively receptive when listening to the radio than
when he is face-to-face with the speaker."
The results obtained by Prof. Joseph E. Maddy
of the music school, who teaches singing, stringed
and woodwind instruments by radio, radically con-
tradict this report. Professor Maddy broadcasts
his lessons three times a week from the Morris
Hall studies through Station WJR. He has regular
classes in several grade and high schools of the
state, as well as individuals who make a practice
of listening in. He reports that in no case has he
encountered a failure among his radio students,
and believes that in many ways the radio method
is superior to the personal lesson.
Professor Maddy', students in the various schools
range in age from 7 to 17. He also has several
adults in private homes, however, and the success
here has been just as marked as with the class
lessons.
Direct teaching by radio has been called impos-
sile. If so, the impossible is being done here at
the University.

COL LEG IATE
OBSERVE=R
By BUD BERNARD
They are still making drastic moves to crush the
spirit of those students at the University of Okla-
homa by enforcement of the university ruling
which prohibits week night dating. Campus patrol-
men have now been ordered to "pick up" all couples
seen together on week nights. Library dates are
included in those to be reported. The president of
the institution says it is certain that the regulation
will not be repealed, but we on other campuses
with a little more liberal regulations will watch
with interest this battle in the western school and
place our sympathies where we will.
Here is a poem coming from the Daily Illini:
ADVANCED ZOOLOGY
Darwin said that man and monkey
Sprang from beings small;
Or else the monkey slipped a bit,
Or man sprang not at all.
Man is like a little worm
Who lives awhile and then,
Before he learns the joy of life,
Gets picked up by a hen.

ee
THE MICHIGANI DAILY
* EXT EN DS SEASON'S GREETINGS
r

Similar success has crowned the efforts of Ohioj
State University. Six radio courses were offered last
fall and more than 1,000 persons enrolled. Regular Colorado University has finally captured their
examinations are conducted by mail, and officials "phantom slugger" who has struck at least a dozen
report that so far the radio students are progress- co-eds as they crossed the campus. The shamed
ing rapidly. "slugger" is an 18-year-old high school boy who
declared he hit the women because he liked to hear

Radio will never entirely supplant the classroomr
as an educational medium, but in the meantime it
is serving the worthy purpose of taking an edu-
cational opportunity to many who otherwise would
have to remain without its benefits.
In a time of financial stress, with many under-'
staffed schools, it is particularly ftting that this
effort should be made to extend the range of edu-
cational facilities.
Forge(tting
-a
T~ *.
OW MANY PERSONS remember
the number of lives lost in the ter-
rible Bath disaster of several years ago? How many
remember the awful total killdd by automobiles in
1933? How many remember even five occurrences
in Michigan, happening within the last five years
in which there has been wanton destruction of
human life?
We will venture to say that there are mighty
few persons who can give positive answers to those
and similar questions. And it is not unusual. Fires,
shipwrecks, murders happen continually, with
lightning-like rapidity - then pass into oblivion.
The public's memory is weak indeed. The trail of
fleeting time leaves many wounds to heal in its
wake. Heal they do, and are forgotten.
So, we are afraid, it may be with the death-
dealing fire in the Hotel Kerns in Lansing. Already
popular feeling for action to prevent a similar
occurrence has waned. Will not fire traps be as
numerous and as dangerous a year from now?
Human life is cheap after all. The loss of it
creates a momentary furor, to be sure, but it is
quickly forgotten. The rest of the world goes about
its ordinary business not even mindful that its own
existence is threatened by factors which it dis-
misses as not of immediate consequence to its little
every day affairs.
As Others See. it,
Hard Luck Story
HIGHEST CONGRATULATIONS TO Coach
Thomas and the 1934 football team for win-
ning its second consecutive Southeastern Confer-
ence championship and a bid to the Rose Bowl.
This year's team is one of the greatest in a long
line of outstanding teams. Our hat is off to a
great football team and its great coaches.I
There is one thing that is brought to the at-
tention of observers of college life, and it is that

them scream and wanted to show them what a
good boxer he was.
This story sounds a little bit too far-fetched
for the tiuth, but this is the story we are told:
A University of Maryland student after several
hours of arguing about resolutions at a peace
mc-ting went to the bank to cash a check.
They asked him to endorse it. In a mental fuzz,
he wrote on the check, "I heartily endorse this
cheek.
We can't reveal the name of the college, but as
you would guess, it's in New England, and is fairly
snooty, to employ the vulgar phrase. Anyway the
boys wanted to have a "hobo day." The dean of
men stiffened his Puritan backbone for a while,
then consented, if they would change the title to
something like "transient day."
The columnist on the Daily Illini tells this story.
A professor of English at the University of Illi-
nois, went into the main library and wandered into
the bibliography section. While there he asked one
of the librarians: "Can you tell me where the
Readers' Digest is?" To which she retorted: "In
the reference room."
"And where," contifliued the professor, "is the
reference room?"
I WANT TO TAKE TIS OPPORTUNITY
TO WISH MY SIX READERS A VERY
MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A VERY EN-
JOYABLE VACATION. WILL AGAIN TAKE
UP THIS JOB JAN. 8, 1935.
following a victorious football season a school is
often flooded by a stream of undesirable students
who enroll under the false belief that they are
improving their social status. These students care
nothing for the college, nor do they add any-
thing to it by their presence. It is so easy for
such a situation to develop in the modern Amer-
ican college, because most of them are in a pre-
carious situation financially; and the -influx
of large numbers is more than welcome from the
treasurer's point of view. But such a situation
is in the long run dangerous, and should never
be allowed to exist.
As everyone realizes, there are more important
values that must be taken into consideration than
financial ones. The administration should restrict
the enrollment at mid-term, and investigate the
records and character of all applicants for
admission with great care.
-The Alabama Crimson-White.
Query in the Columbia Spectator regarding that
institution's gridiron future: "Littlemen, what
now!"

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NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR M. TAUB

x-"---

A Trial For The,
Reading Period..9
T7HE ATTENTION of the University
administration and faculty will for
the next month be focussed on an educational ex-
periment to be conducted in the political science
department. This experiment, if it proves to be suc-
cessful, might very conceivably be the forerunner
of a revolutionary step in the University program.
Necessitated by the temporary absence of a mem-
ber of the department, one course in political
science will not meet from the end of the Christ-
mas vacation period until the final examination. As
an 9lternative, the group, which includes some 75
students, mostly upperclassmen, will have a "read-
ing period' Members of the class will be expected
to devote the time orCinarily spent in the lecture
room to assigned outside reading, and the comple-
tion .of a special project dealing with some phase
of the course.
Thus the semester is divided into two separate
parts, with the first 13 weeks beihg spent in some
outside reading and lecture sessions, and the last 3
prior to the final examination being devoted to in-
dependent reading and the development of a proj-
ect on subjects connected with the course.
The chief advantage of such a plan lies in the
fact that the student is placed on his own for three
weeks, free from what many educational author-
ities term "babying" by the faculty. The belief that
the student is not given enough opportunity to per-
form individual research work in social scienc
courses has often been expressed. However, thi
progressive step i~i education will supply that op-
portunity.
In addition to this, undergraduates have, as a
whole, long felt the need for a period between the
termination of classes and the beginning of the
final examination schedule which might be de-
voted to review and general preparation. This
three-week interval would afford those students
who are either carrying heavy schedules, working
their way through college or participating in extra-
curricular activities just such an opportunity.
Although the plan is a complete innovation at
Michigan, it is not entirely experimental and un-
tried. It has been very successful in English col-
leges, as well as several American universities in-
cluding Yale and Dartmouth. Sentiments expressed
by officials at these institutions is to the effect that,
since the installation of the "reading period," ex-
aminations have been superior in regard to indica-
tions of perspective and comprehension.

WASHTENAW

GAS

COMPANY

211 EAST HURON STREET

The SOAP BOX

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request.Contributors are asked to
be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Rebuke
To the Editor:
The editors of The Daily have criticized the
Michigan Youth Conference because "a radical
tone cfiaracterized its actions." It further appears
that The Daily dismisses, as of no importance, all
that the conference has accomplished, with a pass-
ing reference to the meaningless puerility "impet-
uous youth"; and that, thirdly, because only a
handful of campus organizations were represented,
the congress hardly did justice to Michigan youth.
This is an undeserved compliment to the in-
fluence of those campus organizations which were
not represented at the conference. As compared'
with the 500 delegates representing more than
150,000 youths throughout the state, any opposing
program which these campus organizations might
have espoused would merely express the opinion of,
of .,t c +Inc. 0 fA R n 1-,toin nnA fiicTi(3Pn, r i ii,

which will, at the same time, enable us to pass
through the present crisis successfully. Perhaps
The Daily's program for the bettermient of condi-
tions will allow all to be equitably served and bring
peace and happiness once more to the land.
No doubt The Daily's program will not see fit
to condemn Fascism, the increased military appro-
priations, the decreased educational budgets, the
increasing number of jobless and other such "fine
vagaries," all of them radical espousals truly de-
structive of the nation's moral fibre.
Perhaps The Daily's program, like that of the
Mayor's will be more simple and direct. The latter,
benignly looking down upon the youthful congress
assembled before the speaker's platform, advised
them, out of the wealth of his worldly experience,
with benevolent kindness dripping at every word,
to go back home to their dear parents and to learn
there in the warmth of their care and protection,
how to become good men and good women, good
neighbors, and good citizens..
Later in the evening, the Communist speaker had
the temerity to suggest that a good many people
had no home to return to, and even made refer-

IEReligiousActivite
The Fellowship of Zion Lutheran
Liberal Religion Church
Washington at Fifth Avenue
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
State and Huron Streets
December 23, 1934
December 23, 1934
9:00 a.m.---Sunday School; -lesson
5 o'clock topic, "Christmas and the Home."
Christmas Candlelight 10:30 a.m.-Advent service with ser-
Service mon on
VERY MERRY "SALVATION
6:00 p.m.--Buffet suppe.FRM iN
FROM SIN"
7:00 p.m.-Children's play with Santa CHRISTMAS Text, 1 John 1. 1-10.
Claus and Christmas carols-under
the direction of Mrs. Willard C. 7:30 p.m.-Service of Christmas
Olson. ANDOmusic.
First Methodist A
Eisp Church MOST HAPPY St. Paul's Lutheran
piscopMissouri Synod)
State and Washington West Liberty and Third Sts.
Charles W. Brashares, Minister N EW YEAR Rev. C. A. Brauer, Pastor
December 23, 1934
December 23. 1934 9:30 a.m.-Service in German.
9 :45--Ccliege Age Class for young 10:45 a.m.--Service in English.
men and women in the balcony December 24. 1934
of the Church Auditorium. Dr. 6:30 p.m.-Children's Service.
Roy W. Burroughs is the teacher. December 25. 1934
10:45--MorningrWorship Service: 9:30 a.m.-Christmas Service in Ger-
man.
Dr. Brashares'ma 10:45 a'.m.-Christmas Service in Eng-
rrir _ /w l. //li1 l

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