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December 18, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-18

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T +lF MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECE

.. .. ... ... ... a.s . . A.d. .l.d lea .s. 4A a..a a. v.f ar .c v ss am . . m m

Bruno Denied Eleven Requests

Youth Congress
Hits Domination,
Of Fraternities
War, Fascism, Denounced
In Resolutions Passed
By MichiganYouth
(Continued from Page 1)
the development and well being of
the American people and urge that
every step be taken to bring it with-
in reach of all; that the retrench-
ment policies of the state and Feder-
al governments be checked; that Fed-
eral and state appropriations be ad-
vanced to needy schools, and for the
building of new schools, playgrounds.
and recreation centers; and that
tuition fees be lowered.
"That cooperative houses be ex-
tended as well as opportunities for
student employment; that the control
of self-help offices and appointments
be removed from the hands of frat-
ernities and other vested interests
where such a situation exists, and
administered democratically by the
student body."
The congress went on record as
opposing the R.O.T.C. and the C.M.
T.C. and C.C.C. camps as groups en-
couraging a war spirit, and also de-
clared itself against the participa-
tion of the United States in the Olym-

Leads Farm Women

An CHAPIN ENTRY SOLICITED
A nou ice Last Prof. Myron B. Chapin of the Co1-
lege of Architecture has been invited
E nisiian Sale by the Wilmington Society of Fine
Arts, of Wilmington, Del., to contrib-
o ute a water-colodr to their winter ex-
At Price hibition to be held in that city from
Jan. 7 to Jan. 26, according to Prof.
Emil Lorch of the College of Archi-

jThe last campus sale of the 'Ensign
during which the yearbook can be ob-
tained for $3.50 will be held today,
Wednesday, and Thursday. The price
of the book will be $4.50 after vaca-
tion.
Students who have already made
the first payment on the installment
plan, must make the second and
,hird payments before the end of the
week, if they wish to take advantage
of the reduced price, Robert J. Hen-
och, '35, business manager said yester-
jay. He also announced that appoint-
ments for senior pictures must be
mnade before Friday of this week at
one of the official studios.
Professor Stanton Begins
Research Work In China
Word has been received here that
Dr. John W. Stanton of the history
department has arrived in China and
has begun his research work in the
College of Chinese Studies at Peiping.
After several month's work at the
university, Dr. Stanton expects to
crors Asia by the trans-Siberian route
to Russia, where he will continue
his work. He will return to Ann Arbor
in the fall in time to resume his teach-
ing duties next September.
opment of the gift book and of the
literary annual and the various types
that appeared both in England and
in this country.
CAMPUS TRAVEL BUREAU

tecture.

-Associated Press Photo
Mrs. Abbie C. Sargent of Bedford,
N. H., was elected president of the
first national organization of rural
women, formed at the Farm Bureau
convention in Nashville, Tenn. The
organization will be known as the As-
sociated Women of the American

ONE TIRE OR
A FULL SET

-Associated Press Photo
Eleven of twelve defense requests for particulars on the indict-
ment against Bruno Richard Hauptmann (right) in the Lindbergh kid-
napping case were denied by Supreme Court Justice Thomas W. Trench-
ard, who commanded the prosecution to disclose what it would charge
caused the death of the Lindbergh baby. This picture shows Hauptmann
leaving the courtroom in Flemington, N. J.
BOOKS I
'Contemporary' rich's Bookstore, is an excellent short
story. This is laid in a picturesque
By O. J. CAMPBELL setting poetically realized; it pre-
The new Campus literary magazine sents a situation full of both narra-
called "Contemporary," which has tive and psychological interest; and
just appeared, fills a deep need. Itf it leaves the reader with the sur-
has long been an anomaly that a stu- prise of an unanswered question.
dent body which harbors as vigor- Margaret Cobb's "Experience" is a
ous an intellectual life as that which moving little tale of futility told from
exists at Michigan should have no or- the point of view of a small boy.
gan of expression. The fact that we The essays express views which are
have here in the Avery Hopwood unusually mature and sound. A. L.
foundation a unique opportunity to Bader's "Gertrude Stein and Auto-
encourage good writing has made imatic Writing" is particularly time-
this lack the more irrational. To ly. Hardly less so is Morris Green-
quote from the cogent editorial with hut's "Michael Gold and the 'Crisis'
which the paper begins, "we are con- in Contemporary Literature." The
vinced that the forces and elements book reviews are expressions of the
of such an intellectual life, if partly same critical maturity. Particularly
dormant, exist on the Campus; they interesting is the plan of having two
need only be released and set into different reviews of the samerbook,
motion around a common center, one William Saroyan's "The Daring
which would' give them direction." Young Man on the Flying Trapeze
This first number is a fine effort and Other Stories."
to attain this ideal. It possesses the The verse in this issue of the maga-
supreme virtue of being interesting Zine is, to my mind, less successful.
In one or two cases the artistic It belongs either to the cult of trivial-
achievement is high. It contains ity or to that of unintelligibility.
three short stories, three critical es- "Minor Comedian" by C. E. Burkland
says, one sketch, five bits of verse is by far the best poem. The parts
and a series of book reviews. "Pid- of it that I understand I regard as
rac's," by Jean Keller, the tale which distinguished in both imaginative
won a fiction contest carried on by conception and execution.
the paper for a prize donated by Ul- The reviewer hopes that the edi-
tors will not regard the function of
Tilden Troupe Will "Contemporary" as too narrowly lit-
P1 Her arc1 6 erary. It should welcome effective
expressions of the political, economic,
William T. Tilden, II, and his pro- and social and scientific interests
fessional group of tennis stars will abroad on the Campus. Only thus
appear in Ann Arbor on their annual can it attain its ideals as the recog-
tour March 16, 1935. The date was rnized organ of all vital student
announced after the meeting of the thought. In the meantime the edi-
Board in Control of Physical Educa- tors are to be congratulated on their
tion yesterday afternoon. initiatives and the considerable at-
This will be the troupe's third ap- tainment of this first number. Their
pearance here. Besides Tilden and project deserves wide and enthusiastic
Ellsworth Vines the group includes support.
George Lott and Lester Stoeffen who _--
joined the professional ranks this
year, among its headliners. I

pic Games to be held in Berlin in Farm Bureau Federation.
1936. _
The congress also opposed the Lun-
deen Bill, "which will provide insur- h i 0~
ance for all, regardless of nativityt a ~1L
age, sex, color, or creed, who are
unemployed through no fault of their Of Nineteenth
own. The national government
should finance this insurance by a ten
progressive income tax affecting all vtury Show
incomes of $5,000 or over."
The resolution also provided that
all workers on relief should receive New Exhibit At Library
a wage equal to the union scale for
the industry, and if such does not Includes Many Popula
exist, the rate in no case is to be less Literary Annuals
than 75 cents per hour, and a mini-
mum 30 hour week.
The committee dealing with the in- Continuing the series of exhibits
ternational situation presented reso- being presented by the University Li-
lutions for the diversion of military brary, a showing of gift books and
funds for increased educational and literary annuals is now being dis-
relief expenditures and facilities, for played in the show-cases in the first
the withdrawal of American troops floor hallway of the Main Library.
from China and the Philippines, and The gift book and the literary an-
for the support of a national stu- nual which are very much alikewere
dent anti-war strike in April, 1935, popular as Christmas gifts during
to protest against the R.O.T.C. and the nineteenth century according to
war preparations by means of mass library officials. Varying greatly in
meetings, "and where possible, a one- size, price, and quality, they contained
day student strike." short stories, essays, poetry, and a
Dr. Ward Spepks number of illustrations. Some gift
Dr. Harry F. Ward, of the Union books and literary annuals were pub-
Theological Seminary, who spoke on lications of a high grade, containing
the subject of "Youth and the Break- stories and poems by authors such
down of the Social Order" in Hill as Byron Bryant Poe Irving, and
Auditorium Sunday morning declared ','n P I g
that young people of today "are anjHaton. owvrohes p-
unwanted generation." cially those issued latest, were not of
The period we are living in, he de- much value. The writing that they
clared, is at such a stage where mass contained was mediocre, and often
and permanent unemployment exists, the stories wstrtsenrthertthe
and it will be impossible for a large available illustrations rather thai
atyorth to obtain jobs in in-procuring illustrations for the bes
pasr of youthetoain- stories available. Because of this
dusty oron te fam. tdeterioration of their quality, gift
"Let us remind you, that history has books and literary annuals died out
a way of disposing of surplus popu- and now are to be found only in at-
lation. There are three ways to re- tics and second hand stores.
move this excess: famine, pestilence, The gift book and the literary an
and war. Pestilence, we have pretty nual began in England in 1823 with
"well conquered by preventitive medi- tepbiaino h Fre-e
cine. Famine, we don't allow to have jthe publication of the "Forget-me-
cnes a.minhreemntalwtoarendnot." This was soon followed by othe
its way. So there remains war, and ipbiain ihsmlryhgl
war we have not conquered." publications with similarly highl~
Youth faces the problem, Dr. Ward sentimental titles such as "Keepsake,'
Yothacedpr"fondingbudemeD.pad and "Friendship's Offering." By 1832
maintained, of "finding undeveloped they had grown into a "fad" and over
power that can be thrown against this sixty different "gifts" were being put
monstrous betrayal of humanity out each year From this high poin
which now is approaching." u ahya.Fo hshg on
"Evhn is inpsch . athe "fad" rapidly died off and was
"Everything is in such a state of practically over by 1860.
uncertainty in the Far East and in p icl over by 1860.
Europe that no one knows when a Gift books and literary annuals ap
match may be dropped into the powd- i peared in the United States a short
er keg. With Europe armed to the time after they did in England. They
teeth, with the Far East mobolized did not become popular until afte
and ready to march, and the United ,theyEnglishcraze had passed, but
States bringing its war preparations when they did, their popularity was
to focus, there is no question that this greater even than that experienced in
society in which you ,live desires you England.
for the conflict. It is thinking it will The exhibit in the library illus
need you desperately in time of war." trates both the chronological devel

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s

Chicago
$5. rd. trip
Four Express Parlor Coaches
Daily Without Change
SPECIAL VACATION FARES
TO ALL POINTS
Tickets and information at
CHUBB'S 12-8 P.M.
Ph. 9142 (2-3450 after 8 P.M.)
CAMPUS TRAVEL BUREAU

EASY WEEKLY
PAYMENTS
FIRESTONE
AUTO SUPPLY AND
SERVICE STORES
VICTOR D. KNISS, Mgr.
Phone 9890 Huron at Division St.

tI1

""""

""

111H

Reduced Prices
on GENERAL
CHRISTMAS CARDS
CORRESPONDENCE
STATIONERY and
CHRISTMAS GIFT ITEMS

NNW
N
dill
I'
'I
i

OPEN EVENINGS
UNTIL XMAS

IF YOU WRITE,
WE HAVE IT

!Il

0. D. Morrill
314 South State Street
The Stationery and Typewriter Store

I
E

I

-===

Jill, -

WE HAVE A COMPLETE
ict- NEW STOCK OF THOSE
andi
Jni- FASHIONABLE
amp WOVEN TIES
the
ing, Which Make Such Nice Gifts
En- For Your Men Friends
ying There is also a complete as-
iore sortment of Novelties that any-
yed. one would enjoy as a gift.
year
mer
sped
ties. CHAS. DOUKAS
the HABADASHERY
vent 1319 So. University
art-
e T. Open 'till 10:30 every night
GIVE CANDY
at Christmas!
Our lines of Betsy Ross. john-

XMAS GIFT
Evans Combination Cigarette Case
and Lighter - Chrome $2.95

Evans Combination Cigarette Case
and Lighter - Black Enamel.

$3.75

Pocket Lighters - Chrome $1.00
Pocket Lighters - Enamel . $2.00
Enamel 3-Piece Dresser Sets $5.00
Chrome Cocktail Sets $4.95
Cloisenne Enamel Compacts $1.00 upwards

I

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