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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 16, 1934 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,

.............

'WEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post.Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor. Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street. New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
{. Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR ........................ JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR..........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR................. ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR..................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G . Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Par-
ker,' William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.

to discuss venereal disease control over the pro-
gram, "Doctors, Dollars and Disease," shows what
handicaps still retard scientific advance, even in
the 20th century.
There is no doubt that the radio chain in ques-
tion was quite within its rights in deciding what
should, or should not, be broadcast over their
stations. That question, however, is beside the
point. For more than 20 years, advanced thinkers
in the United States have been trying to remove
the shroud that has been tightly wound around sex
and related topics. Medical men have pointed out
that if they could remove this veil and attack
venereal diseases in the same manner that they do
tuberculosis, they could cure it within a few years.
Leaders in the medical field have realized for
years that only through some system of educa-
tion could they possibly hope to ever get at the
real root of the trouble. The action taken by the
broadcasters in preventing Dr. Parran from aiding
in this educational movement by lecturing over the
air is a notable example of the mid-Victorianisml
that has hindered science for centuries.
No argument that the broadcasters or others can
offer that such an action is a protection of the
public morals can hold any weight when one con-
siders the veiled approaches to obscenity that com-
mercial programs exhibit.
After all, this is the 20th century. To keep pace
with 20th century scientific progress, we must
abandon our 18th century ideals and adopt those
more fitting to modern achievements and intel-
lectual advance.
As Others See It
Credit To The League
THE GREAT DIFFERENCE between the war
scares of 1914 and 1934 is the League of Na-
tions. The League has proved its usefulness in the
settlement it has reached in the Jugoslav-Hun-
garian controversy over responsibility for the as-
sassination of King Alexander. After the partici-
pants in the Geneva conference had blown off
steam, a general will for peace prevailed and the
result was the Council's unanimous adoption of
the placatory resolution.
The Austro-Serb difficulties of 1914, presenting
many parallels to the present difficulties, were a
matter for negotiation between the two nations
themselves. The prevailing secrecy made it diffi-
cult for the other powers to intervene for peace.
The hotheads on both sides prevailed, allies on
both sides were dragged in, and the fatal spark
was supplied to the European powder mine. In
1934, however, the difficulties growing out of the
murder of a public figure are subject to open
negotiations, and the machinery exists for bring-
ing the nations together in frank discussion.

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
Two Madison, Wisconsin hotels were picketed
by University of Wisconsin students last Wednes-
day as protest against alleged discrimination to-
ward the cast of the "Green Pastures." Picketing
was not for the purpose of decreasing business of
the two hotels, picketers explained, but was to
show that a feeling of racial equality did existC
among the student body.
Here's a contribution coming from L.L.B.:
THINGS I'D LIKE TO SEE
A Tri-Delt who didn't think her house was
the best on campus - A Chi-O who could con-
verse without shouting - a Kappa who was
different - a Gamma Phi who wasn't good -
an O Pi who didn't think she was a poten-
tial Miss America - a Pi-Phi who would ad-
mit they didn't get ali the girls on their first
list.
Tuition at the City College of New York is .one
dollar. Contrasted with this is the minimum yearly
expenditure per student at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology and the average cost to
attend Vassar College. A student in the former
school can not get a year's education for less than
$1,800 and the average Vassar women spends $1,300
between September and June.
"Dear Bud," writes A.A.A., "it might interest
you to know that one of our brilliant freshmen
this year recently brought up the question of
how that enormous Christmas tree in front of
the library was ever taken through the en-
gineering arch. These freshmen certainly get
brighter every year, don't they?
Why theologians throw up their hands. Answers
to queries at the University of Minnesota showed
that no one student in a class of 160 had any
doubts about the truth of evolution and that only
20 per cent of another large class admitted they
had ever heard of Pontius Pilate.
Washington
Off The Record.

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REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Clinton
B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Rich-
ard Hershey. Ralph W. Hrd, Fred W. Neal, Robert
Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Marshall Shulman, Donald
Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob C. Seidel, Bernard
Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Robert Cummins,
Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Raymond Goodman.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein,
Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois
King, Selena Levin, Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison,
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly
Solomon, Laura Winograd, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............RUSSELL B. READ
C REDIT MANAGER................ROBERT S. WARD
OMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts.
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
pndiational Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock..

WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath. Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.

NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL J. ELLIOTT

m

The Alumni
Contribution.. .
PROBABLY THE MAJORITY of stu-
dents take the Alumni Association
and its members as a matter of course. The "old
grads" come back for the football games, wearing
shabby hats and seeming harmless enough. That's
about all there is to it.

The other side of the alumni picture, that which
gives the university its very life blood, is all too
easily overlooked. The state of Michigan is ac-
credited with supporting the University, but it
needs no more than a second look to determine
that the state has played second fiddle to the alum-
ni in putting Michigan in the front rank of state
universities in the United States.
A look at the campus itself furnishes the most
immediate and material understanding of what
graduates have done. The buildings of the Law
quadrangle, most magnificent of campus struc-
tures, are the gift of a graduate, William W. Cook,
as is Martha Cook dormitory. The Clements Li-
brary, Hill Auditorium, Betsy $arbour House, Hel-
en Newberry Residence and many other familiar
campus edifices came to the University directly
through the efforts of alumni or alumnae. The
Union and the League, vital influences in under-.
graduate life, are also the result of graduates' ef-
forts.
In addition to these more obvious benefits,
traceable to individual alumni and alumnae, there
are others, more or less behind the scenes, that
play an important role in student life, such as en-
dowed professorships, fellowships, laboratory ap-
paratus and large library collections.
Many of these things have come to the Univer-
sity through individual gifts, but at present the
Alumni Association is taking steps to insure even
greater benefits for the University from its gradu-
ates. The largest of these plans is the recently
conceived Ten-Year Program, that has already re-
sulted in the gift of several thousands of dollars
to the University in money, and even more in
books and apparatus. Another effort made by
the association is the Emeritus Club, which in-
cludes in its organization graduates who have
been out of the University for 50 or more years,
and constantly keeps its members in touch with
the needs of their alma mater and urges them to
remember the University in their wills.
The students of the-University should thank the
state of Michigan for the opportunity it is giving
them to obtain an education, but always remem-
bering that a greater debt of gratitude is due the
alumni, who in reality have made Michigan what
it is and can be.

To the League's peaceful influence must be added
the wise decision of Jugoslavia to end the mass
deportations of Hungarians, which had intensified
the anger of the Magyar Government and people.
Tension on both sides is relieved, too, by the pro-
posal for an international convention to deal with
cases of political and terrorist crimes and con-
spiracies which may lead to difficulties between
nations. This will be an extension of League activ-
ities and may prove a largely useful one at times
when feelings are inflamed by acts of violence.
It is a heartening spectacle when the world's
leading statesmen devote their energies to the
cause of peace. Foreign Minister Laval of France
spread oil upon the troubled waters by praising his
nation's ally, Jugoslavia, because it had not, "as
others did 20 years ago, taken the law into its own
hands, but had turned to Geneva." Capt. Anthony
Eden of England invoked the aid of League mem-
bers by reminding of the "heavy responsibility
upon all of us at this council table." Italy, while
leaning toward Hungary, kept the parley on an
even balance by favoring orderly procedure in the
controversy. The smaller nations, as well, exerted
efforts for smoothing the difficulty.
It is undoubtedly true, as Dr. Benes of Czecho-
slavakia said, that were there no League of Na-
tions, a Yugoslav-Hungarian war would now be a
"dolorous and horrible reality." It is unnecessary to
point out the virtual impossibility of localizing such
a war, in view of the involved and clashing inter-
ests of the European states. The League may have
fallen far short of realizing all the early expecta-
tions, but the present settlement of the grave
menace to peace goes far toward vindicating the
ideals of its founder, Woodrow Wilson.
-St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Peace Through Distrust
DURING THE PAST YEAR many capable ob-
servers have emphasized the parallelism be-
tween present developments in Europe and those
of 1914. These observations are strongly supported
by history, yet there are alsoin the existing situa-
tion many elements quite unlike those of the
period preceding the last great war. Most important
is the fact that there is now no rigidly crystallized
system of alliances -no counterpart of the Triple
Entente and Alliance.
This fact is strikingly illustrated by the two
great international crises of this year -4the murder
of Chancellor Dollfuss of Austria and the more re-
cent assassination of King Alexander of Jugoslavia
with its present Hungarian development. In the
first case France and Italy, with the support of
Great Britain, were united in opposing any exten-
sion of German influence into Austria. Since the
Hitler government was able to find no support, it
was willing to retreat and peace was preserved.
In the present situation, however, the alignment
is different. Jugoslavia, apparently confident of
French support, has taken a threatening attitude
towards Hungary. Meanwhile Italy, whose alliance
with Hungary has proved to be mutually bene-
ficial, is the natural enemy of the Serb-Croat-Slo-
vene state and urges resistance to its aggressions.
'r hrI. nfn,.n nnu rnan fli n4- . fin - r , +frm Cic , c

By SIGRID ARNE
. (Associated Press Staff Writer)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 15. - Henry Suydam of the
Department of Justice has been hard at work
on the new investigation into crime prevention.
He went home and to bed late one night, pleased
at the thought of the jammed ice-box and the big
dinner planned for the next day.
He woke to find the household in consternation.
Some thief had unloaded the ice-box during the
night. Suydam ate in a restaurant.
The telephone in a senator's home rang late
one night. His sister answered. It was a man
looking for a Job. She suggested he call the
next day.
"But I am one of the senator's most loyal
supporters," he protested.
"Well, hereafter," she replied, "would you
mind supporting him in the daytime?"
MINISTER SIMOPOULIS, from Greece, and his
wife are finding that a recent practical joke
of theirs was a boomerang.
They sent out party invitations all beautifully
written in Greek. Guests had to hunt translators.
Now the acceptances are going back written in
every language including Patagonian.
For weeks Marvin McIntyre of the Presi-
dent's secretariat wondered just how good his
daughter, Marie, was in the amateur the-
atricals to which she gives much time.
Then one night he sneaked into a dress re-
hearsal unannounced.
When he left, he bought 20 tickets for the
next night's performance.
DEMOCRATIC CHIEFS are laughing at an over-
conscientious precinct leader in North Caro-
lina. He had promised his organization 32 Demo-
cratic votes to 20 Republican.
Four days after election, he couldn't be found
and he hadn't turned in the count. I
When the county leader caught him, he looked
crestfallen. He had been hiding because the count
showed 31 Democratic votes and 21 Republican.
Marquis James, who became famous for his
biography of Sam Houston, called "The Ra-
ven," has gained the aid of "Barnie" Baruch,
the New York financier, in writing Baruch's
life story.
But Baruch couldn't stay in one place that
long. So he added James to his traveling ret-
inue, and so far James has seen Europe and the
Florida watering spots.
IEORGE N. PEEK of the Federal import-export
bank threaded his way solemnly down the
speaker's platform and faced several hundred lis-
teners.
The audience was solemnly waiting. Suddenly
they burst into a hearty shout of laughter as the
loud-speaker system at the speaker's table caught
up and bellowed forth what Peek thought he was
whispering to a man on the platform:
"Is this little black thing the mike?"
Eddie Peabody, the little demon of the banjo,
has a message for George Gershwin, the com-

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Christmas
l .-.
j
Do you know a deb in her teens? Is it your
wife's gift that worries you? Or your moth-
er's? Then something to wear is the answer
for each of them . . . and if it's in one of our
boxes it's sure to win approval.

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v o o a o o a o a a a ,,, , a {

To

She's bound to
gift like this.
trimmed.

Tr eeMr
Here's a gift you can absolutely de-
pend upon for acceptability. No mat-
ter how much lingerie a girl has she
always welcomes more . . . and es-
pecially when she fihds that it's Jacob-
SOn'S qua I lily.
SLIPS
$1.95 to $5.95
Crepes and Satins. White and
tea rose. Finest quality.
GOWNS
$2.95 to $1095
Or sleeping pajamas. Crepe sat-
ins, prints, tailored and alancon
trim.
PANTIES
$1.95 to $4.95
Dainty little panties with beauti-
ful lace trim, or in tailored styles.
DANCETTES
.$1.95to $3.95

Nang

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Her

'II

JERSEY

PAJAMAS or

One- and two-piece pajamas . .
and you can get robes to match.

7d ROBES
S$5 .95(

and
up

Botany Flannel PAJAMAS and ROBES
Botany flannel pajamas and robes $ .95 $ 95
in combinations of the season's
gayest colors. to
o-

be pleased with a
Tailored or lace

lo

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Both tailored and
evening boas.
~1 .00 "P .
$lup

'I
*1

HOSE
Belle-Sharmeer Hose-a
"fitting" gift
1,00UP

-
KERCH IEFS
Hand embroidered hand-
kerchiefs that she'll like.
29c up

I

GLOVES

French kid, Capeskin
and Pigskin. All sizes.
15

1 t
SCARFS
The gayest way to keep
warm in winter weather.
up

SHOP
EARLY
BEGINNING THURSDAY
STORE HOURS 9 A.M. TO
9 P.M. UNTIL XMAS.

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