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December 07, 1934 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-07

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PAGE FOUR

THE, MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

that could be said about him and more, and that
the editors were idealistic and spirited young
gcntlemen of the sort that do our universities
ci edit.
Poor Huey! But he's still Der Kingfish in Louis-
iana.

ma

It. Al

N1

COLLEG IATE
OBSERVER.

1c

4

Off The
Deep En..

Publis"aed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
ALaid the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
ssoe'ited olgate rcVss
- 134 gt j' f, 935e
¬ętaiso WSCONSINt
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for repulication of all news dspatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone : 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR ........................JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DRCO.....RLI G. COUJLTER
SPORTS EDITOR................ARTHURCARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ...................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Kenneth Par-
ker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John II. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Clinton
B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Rich-
ard Hershey. Ralph W. Hurd, Fred W. Neal, Robert
Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Marshall Shulman, Donald
Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob C. Seidel, Bernard
Levick, George Andros,-Fred Buesser, Robert Cunmins,
Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Raymond Goodman.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Elaine Goldberg, Betty Goldstein,
Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois
King, Selina Levin, Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison,
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy Shappell, Molly
Solomon, Laura Winograd; Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............ . RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER .... ...........ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER..........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; dlassified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson; Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, $ Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
lKohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.

'T FIE MAJORITY OF STUDENTS
reach maturity at the end of the
freshman year, in the opinion of Professor Worley
of the engineering college. After that, he feels,
it is essential that they should be treated as re-
sponsible persons.
Many of the remaining vestiges of antiquated
educational systems are based on a philosophy
far different from that. University administrations
undoubtedly feel deeply their responsibility over
the students under their guidance. Few stop to
think, however, that extreme paternalism is apt to
be more of an injury than a favor.
A true 'sense of responsibility in the student
ought to be the outgrowth of a gradual training.
It is not so apt to result from suddenly being
pushed off the deep end of commencement.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of ommunicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Flash: Clear All Wires!
Te the Editor:
I realize that filling a six-page campus daily is
a hard job and I'm afraid that others realize it too.
One has just to look at your Page 5 where the
fact that Betty Aigler wore something or other
to match a gray scarf is loudly proclaimed. That
stuff of this type is included in The Daily I am
greatly surprised. The fact that big town papers
indulge in such sartorial rubbish-dealing is no
reason for a supposedly serious publication to emu-
late them. With the world scampering gaily to-
ward an uncertain fate, the colors of new shoe
laces sort of lose their appeal, except of course,
for those children who insist on remaining with
us, to exhibit their pettyness and shallow minds.
-Arthur Miller.
NOTE: We agree completely that Miss So-
'n-So's stockings are of utter insignificance
when compared to the tremours of a very
painful world. The fact remains, however,
that a college daily is in precisely the same
position as a city daily: it must make a defi-
nite appeal to all sections of its reading public,
the dull as well as the brilliant, the shallow
as well as the learned. The truth, Mr. Miller,
is that quite as large - and certainly far more
audible - a group reads Page 5 as reads Page
4. Miss So-'n-So's shoe laces must continue
to be duly reported as long as Miss So-'n-So
and her friends remain so breathlessly inter-
ested in them. - The Editors.
Double Entendre
To the Editor:
Concerning an article on the front page of
Wednesday's Daily, confusion may arise because
the word "Orientation" is being used on the cam-
pus with at least two meanings. Your report shows
that this fall's experiment in extended orientation
of entering women conducted by upperclass women
has met with the approval it deserves.
Professor Hussey is chairman of. a faculty com-
mittee which is studying all the activities of the
short and intensive all-freshman orientation pe-
riod. The name "week" has been dropped because,
while it spoils a week, it lasts barely a hundred
hours. Until this committee has finished its study
you are not in a position to say that "faculty
report approves week of orientation."
Incidentally, if you score the faculty too se-
verely for lack of interest you may make it more
than usually difficult for those who must invite
faculty members to serve on next year's board of
advisors.
-Norman Anning,
Faculty Advisor to Group 64.
As Others See It

By BUD BERNARD
Collegiate observings from here and there-
Reports have it that 30 freshmen were promised
the class presidency in election deals at the
University of Florida - Men outnumber girls five
to one at the University of Alabama - At the
University of the Philippines before a student
may make a speech he has to have his proposed
speech censored and O.K.'d by the university -
Casey Stengel, manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers,
failed to make the baseali team at the University
of Wisconsin.
The first intercollegiate baseball game was
played in 1859 between Amherst and Williams.
The Amherst team won 66 to 32 - The first foot-
ball game was played in 1869 between Princeton
anr Rutgers, Rutgers winning six touchdowns to
four. Each team had 25 men.- The five most
heavily endowed universities in the country are
Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Chicago, and the Uni-
versity of Rochester.
The names, addresses, and telephone numbers of
all freshmen women at the University of Pittsburgh
can be bought for ten cents.- The University of
North Carolina is the oldest state university in the
country - Columbia 'University is the country's
only national university - Free dancing lessons
are offered to freshmen at Loyola University -
Freshmen at Roanoke College may belong to the
Goldfish Club if they swallow one live goldfish - A
professor at the University of Pennsylvania has
mastered 140 languages believed to be all the va-
rieties known to the world - A burlesque beauty
parade is held once a year at Oregon University in
which men are the participants.
University of Denver freshmen are ejected from
football and basketball games if they are discovered
bringing dates.- Six students at the University of
Delaware were suspended after attending classes in
bathing suits - Students who fail in a subject at
the University of Washington are not permitted to
use the library.
One of the duties of the first professor at the
University of Rochester was to chase cows off the
campus - Seventy-five per cent of the inmates of
the Minnesota State Prison enrolled in university
correspondence courses received grades of A or B -
Two-thirds of the students at the University of
Paris are Americans.
A survey in an eastern university showed that
60 per cent of the students sleep through at least
three hours of classes each week.
4* * *
A very descriptive statement found in the Mar-
shall College publication: Symptoms of the dis-
ease (love) are loss of appetite, hot flashes, delir-
ium, rolling of the eyes and wiggling of the
ears.
A Washington
[BYSTANDER

Dance While You Dine
at
CHUBB'S
Ann Arbor's Largest Restaurant
DINNER DANCING
Friday 6:00 - 7:00 Saturday 6:00 7:30 Sunday 6:00- 11:00
SUPPER DANCING
. Friday 9:30 - 1:30 Saturday 9:30 - 12:30 Sunday 6:00 - 11:00
Music by MARVIN DRUCKENBROD'S Orchestra

For
DAIRY
PRODUCTS
that are PURE and
WHOLESOME
Dial 2-2645
ROYAL DAIRY
421 Miller Ave.

.'

Boston Symphony Orchestra
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
"ONLY MICHIGAN CONCERT"
110 PLAYERS

HILL AUDITORIUM

Tickets $1.00 - $1.50 - $2.00

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11 --8:15
Choral Union Series

1

1

.,

TI.CKETS NOW
Lo eli Thoa
o- speaks on
"ADVFNTURES ON THE AIR
A ND AROUND THE WORL D"
Hill Auditorium
Thursday, Dec.13,at, 8:30

A

Tickets at Wahr's

75c and 50c

Make Reservations Early

LOWELL THOMAS

NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR M. TAUB

One Silver
Liniog,*. .
HE HIGHLY SIGNIFICANT FACT
that three of the four artists on
this season's Choral Union series have performed
before capacity audiences in Hill Auditorium is
complimentary to both Dr. Charles A. Sink and
t6 many University students.
It may be safely stated that the majority of
these four audiences has been composed of stu-
dents, a condition which has not always been in
evidence, either at Choral Union concerts or May
Festivals. This seems unmistakably to point to the
fact that students as well as others are tending to
show a more widespread appreciation toward the
artistic, as opposed to the more mundane, events
of a collegiate existence. Coming at a time when
critics are daily pointing in the most acrid of terms
to the decadence of modern education and the de-
terioration of the college student's character, this
tendency is perhaps one ray of hope.
The Choral Union series is one of the very few
University enterprises which is run on a strictly
non-profit basis. Its primary purpose is to acquaint
students with fine music, presented by artists who
stand at the acme of the musical profession. By
this method, Dr. Sink believes that students will in
time become the cultural leaders in the commu-
nities where they settle after they leave the Uni-
versity.
This is an idea well-founded and sensible and to
Dr. Sink is due much of the credit for the success
of these concerts.

THE DEADLINE
Afor

By KIRKE SIMPSON
EXACTLY why Attorney-General Homer S. Cum-
mings elected to revert to an old custom and
appear in person for the government when the
Supreme Court takes up the gold clause cancella-
tion matter in January is not of record. The offi-
cial outline of his duties declares it to be the
function of the attorney-general to make such per-
sonal appearances "in cases of exceptional gravity
and importance." Mr. Cummings' recent predeces-
sors have honored that more in the breech than the
observance, however.
There can be no question of the exceptional grav-
ity and importance of the issue. Anything that in-
volves 100 billion dollars would justify that de-
scription. If the government's formally-presented
view of what is involved in its effort to expedite a
final decision by the highest court on constitution-
ality of the Congressional enactment striking the
gold repayment clause out of all public and private
loan transactions is accepted, it might be 200
billions.
yET ONLY the preliminary moves of the legal
battle will be staged Jan. 8. The government
has asked the court to consolidate four actions in
the lower courts challenging the right of Congress
to wipe out retroactively a contractural relation
written into bonds and other securities. The quar-
tet of cases cover about all phases of that chal-
lenge. Lumped together, the government contends,
they would represent a complete and final adjud-
ication of the issue.
It is the desirability of that procedure ratherI
than the constitutional question itself that Mr.'
Cummings has undertaken to present personally to
the court. Whether that means he would also make
the constitutional argument if the government's
request is granted is still to be disclosed.
That cancellation of the gold clause uitimately
will be sustained, no official appears in doubt. If
there were any serious doubt in administration
circles, the whole course of New Deal monetary
policy necessarily must have been quite different.
An adverse holding by the high court would topple
the whole New Deal apple cart. The government
petition mades no secret of that. It pictures whole-
sale private, corporate and government insolvency
if the demand of gold clause bondholders for pay-
ment of interest and principal in the equivalent
of $35 gold is upheld.
N THE FOUR CASES proposed to be lumped
for disposition, the simple question of the right
of nnP tn Pant the ennellann undeer the of-

SENIOR PC
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Huey, Iow
Could You*? * * *
-HE RAPIDITY with which Big Ten
editors rallied to the nation-wide
attack on Sen. Huey P. Long for his censorship of
the Louisiana State paper and for his other ob-
noxious habits has brought the expected and the,
unexpected variety.
The Big Ten editors, of course, are fully awareI
that they have done a brilliant thing by cham-
pioning freedom of the press, a cause which hardly
lacked for champions - either in or out of Louis-
iana. They have heaped such abuse on the head
of poor Huey, that no longer can anyone take
him for anything better than an untouchable.
Senator Long himself took the trouble to send a
900-word answer prepaid to an attack of gen-

The Kingfish Crawfishes
HUEY LONG'S skin is thick, but it can be
pierced. The college editors of the Western
Conference have pierced it. The resolution adopted
at their association meeting, condemning Long
for his censorship of the students' newspaper, the
Reveille, at Louisiana State University, and his
"demagogic -meddling in matters purely educa-
tional," has brought forth an apologetic denial.
Long's statement that he had never censored, or
attempted to censor, any university pubication
will be appraised for what it is worth in the light
of the reported facts.
Some of the glaring facts, as reported, are:
that an edition of the paper containing a letter
criticizing Long was held up until the letter was
removed; that the editorial management of the
paper was instructed, first, to publish nothing
objectionable to Senator Long, and, second, to
submit to faculty censorship, on receipt of which
notice the editor resigned. But the saddest of all
the facts in the whole lamentable situation is the
indignity visited upon the university by Long,
in which the university officers and student body
acquiesced.

I

-. :
<: ., -

I

Uniono...
announces that because
of the Gridiron Dance
there will not be a regu-
lar membership dance
Saturday night. There
will be a dance tonight,
however, as usual.

I

Friday 9 till 1.

*:" Loo~

I

S i !

II '

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