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November 28, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Starting C age ,
Lineup Seems
Set For Opener
Gee, Plummer, Jablonski,
Evans, Joslin Compose
First Team
With the opening basketball game
against Calvin College at Grand Rap-
ids only three days away, it appears
that Coach Cappon will start a lineup
composed of John Gee, center, John
Jablonski and Dick Joslin, forwards,
Capt. Al Plummer and Dick Evans,
guards.
The second team, made up of Chel-
se Tomagno, center, Harry Solomon
and George Ford, Jack Teitelbaum
and George Rudness, guards, will un-
doubtedly be used as much as the reg-
ulars. Solomon is hampered at pres-
ent by a wrenched intercostal muscle.
Better Ball Handlers
This second five has proved to be
a better ball-handling quintet, faster
on breaking in for short shots, than
the first team, but Cappon is hope-
ful that the height of Gee, Joslin, and
Jablonski will offset their lack of
speed. w
In practice yesterday, Cappon drove
the Varsity through an offensive drill
against a freshman five, attempting
to smoothen their passing and clean
ball handling, which his intricate
blocking system requires. A short
scrimmage with three reserve fives al-
ternating against ┬▒the first team,
wound up practice.
Gee Improves
The play of the first team was
ragged against the freshmen. Joslin
and Jablonski broke in for numerous
shots, the latter especially being a
very aggressive performer under the
basket, but the passing was poor.
With the substitution of Tomagno,
Teitelbaum, and Ford, the precision
of the blocking plays improved, all
three men eluding their guards con-
sistently, for close-in shots at the.
basket.
The play of Gee, 6-foot-8-inch cen-
ter during the ensuing scrimmage,
showed marked improvement. He
caged one of his team's three baskets,
and out jumped Tomagno on the tip-
off, a feat which henwas unable to do
during spring training.
I-M OPEN THANKSGIVING
Beginning Sunday, Dec. 2, the
Intramural Building will be open
Sundays from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m.
and the swimming pool from 3 p.m.
until 5:30 p.m. Tennis courts may
be reserved from 8 to 10 and 12 to
2, but at all other times during the
day basketball players shall have
prior rights.
The building will also be open
Thanksgiving Day. The same rules
will apply.

Cub Outfielder And Pitcher W ho Go To Pirates

Numerals Are
Awarded To 35
Frosh Gridmen
Twenty-Four Of Fisher's
Squad Named With 11
Of Weber's Men

Pirate Stars Who Now Belong To The Cubs

-Associated Press Photo
Babe Herman (left) and Guy Bush (right) two of the three Chicago
players traded to Pittsburgh in the most important trade of baseball's
major-minor league player mart in Louisville, Ky. Herman was obtained
by the Cubs in 1932 from Brooklyn where ne had proved himself a
good hitter but a poor fielder.
He had a poor year in 1933 but played much better ball last year,
hitting over .300. Bush, a tall right hander with a deceptive delivery,
has been a member of the Chicago Cubs for a long time and it is
believed that a change will benefit him.
By ART
R DUSTCARSTENS

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AN ANCIENT gentleman with rosy
cheeks, white hair, and a benevo-
lent smile waved a Bible under our
nose as we burst into the Methodist
Church offices yesterday afternoon.
Considerably abashed, we hid our
reportorial pencil and asked, "Kind
sir, we're looking for a big, brawny
looking roughneck named Anson
Hagle who played football for Mich-
igan many years ago. We were in-
formed he was here. Knowest thou
said individual's whereabouts?"
"I'm Hagle." We stopped, our
editorial mouths ajar. This
short, plump Santa Claus the
ferocious Anson Hagle who had
played in the line for Michigan
in 1888 and '89, this 75-year-old
patriarch the man who had led
Michigan's flying wedge against
Notre Dame, Cornell, the Chica-
go University Club, and Chicago
Athletic Association?
We sat down to talk after Hagle
had explained that he wasn't exactly
a member of the clergy, only a repre-
sentative of an Illinois firm that pub-
lishes Bibles.
Hagle talked in quiet, slangless
sentences of that first regularly
scheduled football game ever played
in. Michigan between two state
schools. It was between Albion Col-
lege and the University and took place
Nov. 15, 1884. He played in the game,
but on the side of Albion, which was
beaten,.18 to 0.
Horace Prettyman, now of the
University Press, led the Mich-
igan team and these two are, as
far as they know, ,the only living,
survivors of the historic struggle.
After four years of playing at Al-,
bion, Hagle continued, he decided he

was too young to go out into the
world in search of a living (being
only 29 at the time) so he enrolled
at Michigan where Jim Duffy, cap-
tain and coach, welcomed him with
open arms for the 1888 season. In
that year the Wolverines played two
games, losing the opener to Chica-
go University Club, 26 to 4, but com-I
ing back in the season's final to beat
Notre Dame, 26 to 6.
Hagle does not remember having
played in the 1889 campaign but the
little blue book of Michigan's All-
Time Athletic Record says he did,
and we'll give him the benefit of the
doubt.
Maybe he was a little ashamed
of the record that year, for they
won only one game out of three.
Albion was trounced, 33 to 4, in
the first game, but they lost to
Cornell, 56 to 0, and to the Chi-
cago Athletic Association, 20 to 0.
A hint of his clerical associations
crept into his talk as he told us how
good it was for Michigan to lose now
and then, comparing football to the
game of life in which one cannot
always win, and as we closed the door
behind us we heard him extolling
once again the virtues of his Bible,,
"Worth its weight in gold.. I have
laid aside my other
Mrs. Alexander Grant Ruthven is
his niece.
Spartans Will Banquet
Football Squad Dec. 15
EAST LANSING, Nov. 27. - UP) -
Michigan State College will pay trib-
ute to its football players the night,
of Dec. 15 at the Union Memorial
Building when the Central Michigan
Alumni stage their tenth annual ban-
quet. Date of the feast was announced
Monday night.
Only300 tickets will be sold this
year. it was revealed. Highschool
players from all quarters of the state
are annually invited to this event.
In recent years the banquet has out-
grown campus facilities, bringing
about the limitation of tickets to the,
public.

Thirty-five freshman football play-
ers were awarded numerals, accord-
ing to an announcement released by:
the Board in Control of Athletics
yesterday. The group includes 24:
members of Coach Ray Fisher's fresh-:
man squad, and Wally Weber's 11 iron
men.
Of the freshman gridders, those ex-
pected to be of most value next fall
are, Frank Dutkowski, Art Leadeater
Norman Nickerson, and Art Smithers,
backs, and Ed Greenwald, George
Marzonie, Robert Schroeder, and Joe
Rinaldi, linemen.
The complete list of freshman
awards follows:
FRESHMEN - George Babbin
Pentwater; Lawrence J. Barasa, Chi-
cago: Frank Dutkowski, Flint; John
Fisher, Iron River; Herman Fishman,
Detroit; Hubert C. Fones, East Aur-
ora, N.Y.; Stephen Fowdy, Whiting,
Ind.; Paul H. Gleye, Detroit, James
Hayes, Columbus, O.; Robert H. John-
son, Youngstown, O.; Arthur W.
Leadbeater, Jr., Belleville, N.J.; Wal-
ter I. Lillie, Grand Haven; James
Lincoln, Harbor Beach; Earl B. Luby,
Chicago; George A. Marzonie, Flint;
Charles A. Murray, Butte, Mont.;
Alexander F. Muzyk, Pittsburgh, Pa.;
Norman J. Nickerson, Detroit; Jo-
seph M. Rinaldi, Elkhart, Ind.; C.
Stark Ritchie, Battle Creek; John A.
Smithers, Elkhart, Ind.; and Fred-
erick C. Ziem, Pontiac.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FRESH-
I MEN - Robert D. Campbell, Ionia;
Arthur L. Evans, Flint; Charles
Gray, Wheaton, Ill.; John J. Heer-
ing, Jr., Port Huron; Wesley L. John-
son, Ironwood; Merle Kremer, East
Conneaut, O; Highbert M. Lockhart,
Frankfort; Robert Schroeder, Osh-
kosh, Wis.; George Shakarian, Dear-
born; Steve Uricek, Flint; and Arthur1
I. Valpey, Jr., Detroit.
WOMEN'S
SSPORTSEN
Three games were played in the
opening of the Intramural basketball
season yesterday, Kappa Alpha Theta
defeating Kappa Delta, 17-6; Mar-
tha Cook beat Alpha Delta Pi, 12-7;
and League Zone 7 won from Jordan
Hall, 23-6. Alpha Omicron Pi de-
faulted to League Zone 8 due to a
lack of players.
In the Intramural basketball tour-
nament this semester, each team will
play three games, regardless of the
number won. Those which are suc-
cessful in defeating two out of three
of the teams met will enter the final
elimination series.
Because of the Thanksgiving holi-
day, no games have been scheduled
for Wednesday and Friday. Teams
wishing to practice at those times
should contact Miss Marie Hartwig.
The bowling alley in Palmer Field
house will open for practice and meets
after Monday, Dec. 3. Studentsre-
ceiving the highest scores for each
week will be awarded one hour free
play the following week. The Intra-
mural elimination tournament will
open in the near future.
Yanks Defeat Australian 1
Team In Pro-Golf Match'

members of the University with ath-
letic books is seven skates for $1.00,
As Skaters Forget or 25 cents each afternoon and 35
M ichigan Has ink cents in the evening. General ad-
mission is 35 cents on Saturday and
Sunday.
By KEN PARKER All size skates are available to rent.
Business is lousy!
That's the general feeling down
at the Coliseum these days. 1 s*

-Associated Press Photo
Larry French (left) and Fredy Lindstrom (right) ex-Pittsburgh stars
who were traded to the Chicago Cubs recently for Babe Herman, Guy
Bush and Jim Weaver. French is one of the ace Eouthpaws of the
National League and has been a consistent winner with the Pirates.
Lindstrom, who played in a World Series with the New York Giants
in 1924 when he was only 19 years old, was considered one of the best
third baseman in b seball. When he Burt his back he was changed to
the outfield and was traded to the Pirates in 1932.

Fight Lasts 11 Seconds ;
Referee Counts Last 10
Eleven seconds after the opening
bell of the Dvorak-Corkingdale bout
Monday night at the 125th Infantry
Armory Ann Arbor's.fight fans had
seen the shortest bout in the history
of the armory, if not the shortest in
amateur records.
The two bantamweights. Dvorak of
Chelsea and Corkingdale of Detroit,
really didn't stage a fight. It might
have been had there been more than
one blow landed, but there wasn't and
Referee Hennessey was lifting- the
Chelsea fighters right hand in victory
- his left having laid Corkingdale
flat on the canvas a second after the
bout opened - before a quarter-min-
ute had elapsed.
Dvorak was out of his corner with
the bell and hit the Detroit boy be-
fore he took two steps.
FRIENDLY ADVICE

IT CAN BE DONE - SMILE
Tells you everything you wish to
know without asking a single ques-
tion.
If worried, unhappy, unsuccessful,
and all seems to go wrong; if hus-
band, wife, or sweetheart seems in-
different; or if business worries you
seek the solution through a reading.
Confidential Readings - 50c
Hours 10 A.M. to 8 P.M.
526 Division St.
South Side Apartment Entrance

Records revolve slowly and waltzes
wail from the loud speaker; a dozen
skaters or so glide about on the ice;
the skate sharpener sits and looks
over the freshly painted counter, and
Eddie Lowrey waits in the ticket of-
fice. It's very lonely down there, like
the lake resort in September.
"I don't think the students know
there is a skating rink in Ann Arbor,"
says Lowrey, manager of the Univer-y
sity-owned Coliseum and Michigan's
hockey coach. "Why the other day
a fellow asked me what this build-
ing was. 'It's an ice skating rink,'
I told him. He was very surprised,
and said he didn't know that and
wished he had known it before."
Another theory advanced concerns
the weather. This is an unusually
warm November. The ground isn't
frozen, nor is there even a slight'
layer of snow, nothing to suggest
winter sports, let alone ice skating.
So if you are not conscious of the
fact, the Coliseum is situated on the
corner of Hill and Fifth streets and
is open daily from 2:30 to 5 p.m.
and from 8 till 10 in the evenings,
except on Sunday when it is open
from 3 till 5 only.
Admission for students and faculty
-

o

P
SPARE THE AXE AND
SPOIL THE TURKEY-
TOMORROW between eating our
holiday meal and offering thanks
for the benefits of the past year, we'll
all be kept busy. We at this time want
to thank our many patrons for the con-
fidence they've shown in our work and
want to say that the same quality and
care will continue to characterize our
service. And just in case some of that
cranberry sauce happens to spot your
clothes tomorrow, offer thanks that
they can again be restored to perfect
neatness by one of our ultra-modern

0

cleaning and pressing jobs.
OSWALD KATZ

810 South State

CLEANERS and DYERS

Phone 6868

That's the only kind
stor about the young
of a hnsgvn

I -

P
H
0
N
E

New Cars for Taxi Service
CAMPUS CABS
24-HOUR SERVICE

Wouldn't it be

a Good Idea

P
H
0
N
E

1i

f I

To Wear FULL DRESS to
The Thanksgiving Formals?

w
A
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G
R
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N

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y
s
T

al

...... .

MELBOURNE, Nov. 27. - (OP)- An
American professional golf team made
a clean sweep today of the individual
matches to defeat an Australian team
8 to 1 in a two-day play contest.
In the 36-hole contest, Leo Diegel
beat Rufus Steward, 8 and 7; Craig
Wood conquered Ted Naismight, 5
and 4; Denny Shute beat Lou Kelly,
5 and 4; Harry Cooper downed Fer-
gus McMahon by the same score; Paul
Runyan won from Sam Richardson,
7 and 5, and Ky Laffoon defeated
Martin Smith, 2 and 1.
The Americans won two of the three
#best-ball, four-ball matches yesterday.

IT'S NOT TOO LATE !

E

man who

collared

his

M

first job at a pitifully
small remuneration.
. A friend asked, "Do
you think you can live a
decent, upright life on a
salary like that?"
"That's the only kind
I can live on a salary like
that," replied the boy.
The Suits
$25 to $35
T7 ATV A VF.CT DVC

Take a Box Home To The
Folks For Thanksgiving

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ASSORTED CHOCOLATES.
CHOCOLATE COVERED NOUGATS
NO CHOCOLATE ASSORTMENT.
BUTTERCREAM NUT CARAMELS.
FLAVORED HARD CANDIES.
CHOCOLATE COVERED CHERRIES.
TRUE FRUIT FLAVOR JELLIES.
CHOCOLATE COVERED ALMONDS.
CHOCOLATE COVERED CARAMELS.
MINIATURE CHOCOLATES.
RUFFMADE CHOCOLATE CREAMS

42ca
42ca
35c a
49c a
35c aI
39c aI
25c aI
42ca
42c a
98c aI
39c aI

box
box
box
box
box
box
box
box
box
box
box

Wve nesday
A fool is one
who is intelli-
gent at the
wrong time.

Our stock of tailcoats is extremely
modern and fashionable. You can
be sure of getting the last word in
correctness. The lapels 'are dull
ribbed "silk, the trousers are high
rise and pleated, the waistlines are
high and suppressed, the shoulders
wide, but not extreme. In fine qual-
ity black unfinished worsted. A suit
that brings out your good points and
soft pedals the others.
$4Q
Backless white pique weskits are
priced from $5.50, dress shirts from
$3, white scarfs from $1.95. An ex-
ceptionally fine patent leather shoe
at $6.50.

We Carry a Complete
Selection of ASSORTED NUTS

uTlIni

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