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November 24, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-24

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1934

" ICE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1934 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

Minnesota And Purdue, Fighting For

Title, Meet Wisconsin, Indiana

5 Conference
Games Today
Close Season
Illinois, Chicago Expected
To Put Up Great Battle;
Iowa Faces Ohio State
Today will be the first time in five
years that the Big Ten season will
have closed without Michigan being
a claimant for the championship of;
the Western Conference:
Every Conference team meets a
time-honored rival from within the'
Big Ten today and the two teams
which have a chance for the cham-
pionship are not expected to falter on
the way.
The undefeated, untied Gophers of
Minnesota are ready to face Doc
Spears, Wisconsin team at Madison.
It will be the last game for several
of the Viking stars including Capt.
Francis (Pug) Lund, Bill Bengston,
Milt Bruhn, Frank Larson, and Bob
Tenner, who are determined to end
their careers in a blaze of glory.
Hoosiers Meet
Purdue. co-holder of first place with
Minnesota, will meet Indiana in an
intra-state battle. The Boilermakers,
who have not had a very hard con-
ference schedule, although they lost
two outside games will try to show
their worth against the Hoosiers. The
famous "touchdown twins," Purvis
and Carter are rounding out their
careers at the Lafayette school, along
with thirteen other veterans, and they
would like nothing better than to do
so as champions. A victory for In-
diana would place the "Old Oaken
Bucket" in their hands for the first
time since 1930.
Capt. Monahan in Last Game
Ossie Solem's Iowa team will in-
vade Columbus to tackle Francis
Schmidt's Buckeyes. There has been
a, great deal of talk about a post- 1'
season game between Ohio and Min-
nesota, and the scarlet-clad OhioI
team will be out to confirm its right
to such a game. Capt. Monahan,
Smith, Wetzel and Yards are regulars
who will play their last game for
Ohio State.
Illinois runs up against Chicago inf
what is expected to be one of the best!
games of the day. Both teams are
primed and ready to go. The result
of this game will determine the dif-
ference between a successful or unsuc-
cessful season for both teams. Beynon
and Bennis, co-captains, and Lind-
berg will be the regulars playing their
final game for the Champaign school
while Capt. Patterson will be Chi-
cago's outstanding loss through grad-
uation.
Michigan Holds 7 To 3
Edge In Wildcat Series

Plays Last Game For Wolverines Today

Army Opposes Hockey Team Shows Progress
Irish. Harvard After First Week 0f Practice
At Y ale Today Coach Eddie Lowrey was pleased ie's defense, and with brilliance and
with the showing his hockey team accuracy sent shot after shot into
made last night, just one week after the net.
Stanford-California Game the opening of practice. Already the Although the forward line has been
Heads West Coast Card; sextet is smoothing out the rough set tentatively with Sherf at left
spots in its offense, and gaining skillswt
State Tackles Kansas and dexterity in handling the puck. wing, Heyligerg t cener, adire rn
Lowrey is still in great need of a Grm at rihtng, the rern
Ancient gridiron rivalries will be goalie to relieve Captain Johnny Jew- of Gil McEachern to active service
renwedthi afernon n sverl -ell, and is issuing a. call for any men Monday may cause a change. Mc-
renewed this afternoon in several e i n ory Eachern, who has been out this week
sections of the country as the 1934 with experience who wish to try out due to an injury received in practice,
for the team.
football season nears its end. Eastern A attack which functioned will be groomed for one of the for-
fans will be presented with the out- well last night had Vic Heyliger, cen- ward posts, probably right wing.
standing games of the afternoon, the ter, and Captain Johnny Sherf, left One more week of intense practice
Army-Notre Dame and Harvard-Yale wing, as key man. Heyliger consist- before the first game should leave
ently found weak spots in the goal- the Wolverines ready to cope with
scraps.-Amherstburg on Dec. 4, the opening
Without a doubt the mammoth Yale game of the season.
Bowl will be filled today as two teams Swiga otsers Host To- -
that began their rivalry as soon as
football became a sport in the United State Prep Coaches
States, stage what should be a great___
battle. Yale, with its victory over Coach Matt Mann and his Varsity
Princeton still fresh in mind, is fa- swimmers will be hosts today to
vored because of its past performances swimming coaches from high schools
but will meet a team gunning for an throughout Michigan. They are con- Rn.TERNITY
upset. vening here for the annual rules meet-
Cadets Out Far Revenge ins iunder the leadrs~rhip of C. E.I''\T

I.

I

Gerald Ford is one of the six Wolverine regulars who will end his
football career this afternoon against Northwestern.
Playing his first season as a regular, Ford has started and played
the greater part of each game, despite enough injuries to keep several
less hardy men confined to bed. He suffered his most serious hurt, aj
bruised hip, in the Ohio State game last week, which forced him out
of uniform earlier this week, but will start today.
'TA"' IT yCARSTENS
4I

In a season of crushing defeats in
which a new high for losses in one
Wolverine grid campaign was set,
the Michigan football tradition has
received some of its greatest compli-
ments.
Minnesota, the best team in the
country this year, was overjoyed
at its overwhelming defeat of
Michigan, 34 to 0, and Ohio State,
rated far above the Wolverines,
went mad when Michigan fell by
the same score to the Buckeye
attack.
Why did 60,000 fans at Minneapolis
proclaim such unusual joy and de-
light at the spectacle of a lopsided
game? Why did 70,000 fans at Col-
umbus go wild, tear up their own
goal posts and in general give vent
to a crazy outburst of enthusiasm,
over a victory which was never in
doubt throughout the entire game?
The answer, of course, is the Michigan
tradition. Metaphorically, Rome fell
twice, once at Minneapolis and once
at Columbus. It marks temporarily,
at least, the end of a long tyranny
over the Big Ten.
* * *
Reports keep coming in from the
Coliseum about this sophomore pros-
pect Vic Heyliger, whom Lowrey in-
tends to use in the forward line this
season. The reports are decidedly
favorable. Heyliger, a Boston lad, is
plenty fast on the ice, stooges tell me,
and can rag the puck, and is a good
shot. It looks like another good
hockey season, what with Johnny
Sherf, the rip-tearing, high scorer
from last year back to prove his place
as captain and left wing on the myth-
ical Midwestern, All-Star hockey
team.

Turning to a couple of freshmen
who may see action on Varsity teams
in the next few years:
Lowrey has a freshman hockey
player in Gib James, a youth
from Ottawa, Canada. James is
working out with the Varsity
now, and Lowrey claims he's go-
ing to make a good hockey player.
James was placed on the Eastern
Canadian prep school selections.
In wrestling, Earl Thomas, brother
of Blair Thomas, who captained the
Wolverines in 1933, is a freshman onI
the grappling squad.
While in high school at Cresco,E
Iowa, a state where wrestlers and
corn are grown in abundance,
Thomas won a National A.A.U.
title in the 118-pound division.
He is a bit heavier now, and gives
promise of being a good prospect
for Coach Keen.
SOLOMON INJURED
Harry Solomon, forward on the
Varsity basketball team, injured 'anf
intercostal muscle in practice last
night, and was ordered to bed by
Health Service authorities. The ex-
tent of Solomon's injury will not be
known for several days, but it is not
expected to be serious.
FISHER ON CRUTCHES
When Joe Fisher, reserve Wolver-
ine tackle, broke his leg in last Mon-
day's scrimmage, he made record
time in becoming acquainted with
his crutches, for he walked home on
them the same day. He was ordered
to keep off the injured leg thereafter.
"

The game between the Cadets and
the Irish from South Bend should
be one of the closest of the long
series of games that the teams have
played. They appear practically even
on paper and experts are divided in
predicting a winner. A fast set of
Army backs may be able to revenge
last year's one point licking, but
Layden has a powerful battalion of re-
serves that may swing the balance
Notre Dame's way.
Also in the East, unbeaten Temple
takes on Villanova, expecting to main-
tain its unblemished record. Columbia
and Syracuse end their schedules to-
day with Syracuse favored to finish
the year in a blaze of glory. Crippled
Dartmouth invades the lair of the
Princeton Tiger for its final game but
are not rated to beat the strong Ben-
gals.
Final For Stanford
Stanford, with eight wins and one
tie, is expected to take the final step
to the Rose Bowl today in the game
with California that features the West
Coach schedule. An intra-state rivalry
in the West reaches its peak today
with Washington and Washington
State clashing and furnishing the ex-
perts one of their toughest games to
pick. Washington is a slight favorite,
however.
Rice meets Texas Christian in the
Southwest. The big attractions in the
South are the Georgia-Auburn and
Florida-Georgia Tech games. In the
Mid-West Michigan State tangles
1 with Kansas in what seems to be a
toss-up game. Detroit and Marquette
meet in Milwaukee where the Titans
of Dorais will try again to regain
their winning ways.
DANCE at
GRANGER'S
TONIGHT
GALE HIBBARD and His
12-PIECE BAND

U

I ____j

Scores of past
western games:

1892-Mich.
1893-Mich.
1898-Mich.
1901-Mich.
1917-Mich.
1919-Mich.
1924-Mich.
1925-Mich.
1932-Mich.
1933-Mich.

8
72
6
29
12
16
27
2
15
13

Michigan-North-
Northwestern 10
Northwestern 6
Northwestern 5
Northwestern 0
Northwestern 21
Northwestern 13
Northwestern 0
Northwestern 3
Northwestern 6
Northwestern 0

D
6
5.
D
1
3
D
3
Q

Men 40c

Ladies 25c

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One Week Only

11

U

yes, and
here's why -
We know that smoking a pipe
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There is a certain kind of this tobacco
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This is the kind of tobacco that we use,
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We got the right pipe tobacco, made
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Bottle of Aspirin.........1 9c
Walgreen Milk of Magnesia. 19c
Tooth Brush .............19c
Glazo Nail Polish .........19c
Rubbing Alcohol ...... pint 19c
Zinc Ointment...........19c

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15c Cigarettes
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