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November 23, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-23

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P'AGOU IR

THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1934

:: v v..v.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

6 T TH( M paFpg r.QMg~gnignptm w,
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
As ociated (E 11tiate J$res
,4AMSOC WISCON4SIN
'4EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for repulication of all news dispatches credited to itor
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
disipatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50, During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N .Y, - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CfTYEDITOR............. .JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ...........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ...................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott,.John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas' H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
VPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
\leming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
yGobert Cum ins, Fred Delano,nRobert J. Friedman,
Puymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger. Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon. Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bttman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
NIGHT EDITOR: THOMAS H. KLEENE

ready to help students who wish to try for the
scholarships.
The new openings rank considerably above class
elections as training ground for future men in
government.
Standing Room
At Oxford ...
A ORHODES SCHOLAR from the Uni-
versity of Minnesota went to Ox-
ford. He began writing back to his paper a series
of informal impressions of life at that famous
old English university.
Last week he found something very disturbing
to write about. One day he had to stand in an
ill-ventilated little hall crowded with people to
hear a lecture by G. D. H. Cole, university reader
in economics.
Turning to a lecture in German on "The Relig-
ious Factor in Civilization," he found that 400 or
500 others had had the idea sooner, and he stood
again. At a class in political theory the following
morning he discovered all the chairs occupied and
was graciously motioned to a place on the floor
where he sat cross-legged for 60 minutes.
Reasonably early on a Sunday morning he went
to St. Aldgate's Church to hear the very Rev.
W. R. Inge, the "gloomy dean." There a compara-
tively privileged class was standing inside, while
the rest got as close to the doors as they could
in the jam outside and listened.
The Minnesota scholar was very much surprised.
Fortunately, he had learned to stand while attend-
ing his American alma mater. For undoubtedly
at one time or another he must have stood in
the rain to see a football game, stood in line to
register, or stood through a free show in honor
of the football team.
As OtIe rs See It
On Student Government
STUDENT GOVERNMENT will never progress
very far beyond the stage of regulating tradi-
tions and charging 25 cents for student automobile
licenses. Should there arise, through a well-edu-
cated miracle, a student governing body that was
completely autonomous, the ill-feeling that would
follow would be disastrous.
We take for granted that the best and the
most capable students would be elected to this
mythical governing body, and if they are sensible,
they would set up regulations similar to those
now enforced by the University, for they would
realize that no society or unit thereof can be
conducted without rules and regulations. The rea-
son is that there are too many ignoramuses,
deluded individuals, and other persons of that ilk
who would run wild were there nothing to hold
them down.
The student legislators and executives who would
attempt to enforce the regulations would be con-
sidered by their fellow students as traitors to the
common welfare, and it is not unreasonable to sup-
pose that the students who would be doing the
governing would not feel any too happy about
the imposing restrictions on their classmates.
We see in the W.S.G.A. an example of this un-
fortunate situation. Co-eds have taken the respon-
sibility of naming certain of their members to
lay down the law to the group. A girl breaks one
of the rules. She is "brought on the carpet," and
her freedom is restricted as a punishment. She
feels resentful, and the executors of justice feel'
conscience qualms when they think of the times
they have stepped over the traces. Were the Uni-
versity officials themselves to do the reprimanding,
co-eds would still feel resentful, but at the same
time they would feel that it was natural and
right, and the incident would be forgotten soon.
We do not mean to be over-critical of the
W.S.G.A. or those at the head of the organization,
because the situation is no way their fault and
because they are attempting in so far as possible
to improve the lot of the co-ed. They help fresh-
men become acclimatized to college life and per-
form many other services of which men students
have no conception.
That there be some form of government is an
unquestionable fact. We grant also that students
should have a voice in formulating the regulations
and rules by which they are governed, but the

enforcement should be left in the hands of the
University. That is why we say that student
government will never progress beyond the stage
of regulating traditions and charging 25 cents
for a student automobile license.
-The Purdue Exponent.
Fawncy Gag
UP ON THE STERN and rockbound coast of
-Massachusetts within the ancient walls of Fair
Harvard, an awful thing took place.
After the worthy editors of the Harvard Lampoon
and the Princeton Tiger had so far forgotten their
inveterate hostility as to get together in all good
faith to sponsor a joint reconciliation issue of the
magazine, some dastardly band of criminals stole
the entire issue from the publications office at
Cambridge.
It was a mean and nasty crime.
The editors of The New York Times fully realized
the gravity of the affair. They pushed aside the
European war scare, the Japanese naval race and
the epic social struggle for dear little Gloria Van-
derbilt, all to make room in the center of the front
page for a sombre report of the unholy deed,
At Harvard there were riots and mass meetings
as Crimson undergraduates angrily sought the
thieves.
The depression, war threats and even the next
day's football game were all forgotten in the hectic
search for the lost issue. Throughout Boston and
New Haven, the feverish investigation went on.
Excitement reached an unusual climax in lethargic
Cambridge - Seniors spoke to Freshmen and a
Cabot nodded to a Smith.
Then the bomb exploded - or rather - the

.1

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER

I

By BUD BERNARD
The Illinois campus votes for their hero of
the week a student who has devised the follow-
ing painless method of arising in the morning.
1. He turns off his radio at night by a pull
cord on the ceiling.
2. Ties a rock to the cord and balances
same on window ledge.
3. Takes alarm bell off clock.
4. Attaches alarm bell clapper to rock by
means of a string.
Then when clapper moves at the designated
hour in the morning, the rock falls off and
turns on the radio, bringing in soothing morn-
ing musical program.
Highly perturbed are the students at Queen's
College, Kingston, Ontario, over what they con-
sider an insulting display by a Kingston merchant.
However, they do give the merchant credit for
meaning well. But when he goes to the point of
adding women's silk lingerie and liquor bottles for
local color in a college boy's room, Queen's is
indignant. Other items in the model collegiate
room are an unmade bed, a lop-sided window cur-
tain pole, profuse cigarette butts, littered papers
and books, and a collection of highly suggestive
signs.
Here's a contribution coming from a person
who signs himself "Mickey."
Love is like a cuckoo clock-
(I don't know, I only heard)
You're safer when it's on the blink,
Otherwise you get the bird.
An emotional crisis threatened the University of
California campus recently, when members of the
newly formed Women's Auxiliary to the Football
Team started a strike on all "kissing, necking, and
using lipstick" until the team won a conference
game by a seven-point margin.
Other members also added the edict of banning
dates, cutting cigarettes, candy, manicures, mar-
cels, haircuts and cutting classes.
A sophomore at California says when a
co-ed's faoe is her fortune it generally runs
into an attractive figure.
Denver University freshmen are forcibly ejected
from all football games if they are discovered
bringing dates with them.
A pawn shop has appeared on the campus of
Wake Forest College which appears to have both
a boon and a curse. The students have found it
mighty nice to be able to borrow money when they
need it, but the wardrobes and personal belong-
ings of individuals on the campus are diminishing
rapidly.
A Washington
O I
BY STAN DE R
By KIRKE SIMPSON
IT IS DIFFICULT to discover from the published
versions of his remarks on exactly what premise
Sen. Arthur Vandenberg based his suggestion for
"a virtual coalition government." He toyed also
with estimates of Republican popular gains in
the elections to find that the party had polled
46 per cent of the vote cast this year as against
41 per cent in 1932.
Coalition on that basis ought to be acceptable
to any Republican. Coalition on the basis of an
actual Democratic Congressional plurality of better
than two-thirds in each house would be another
matter.
Nevertheless, once the lines of cleavage on spe-
cific issues within Democratic ranks become clear
as the first session of the new Congress pro-
gresses, the Vandenberg coalition idea may bear
fruit. At least the fact that he voiced it must be
taken as an indication of how he plans to govern
his course.
And there is no escape, for all his modest
disclaimers, from the notion that the victory of
what he calls "liberal" Republicanism in Mich-

igan which he personifies, set off against the
general background of conservative Republican
defeats elsewhere, makes Vandenberg a marked
man.
THE SENATOR defines the essence of the Mich-
igan Republican platform which he holds up
as a blue print after which the 1936 national
platform shall be patterned, as "social responsibil-
ity in government without socialism." That is a
nice, epigrammatic statement. Translating it into
legislative practice, let alone making the distinc-
tion clear to voters will afford the senator a
field of operations wide enough and difficult
enough to test severely his national party leader-
ship capacity.
Whether he is to be the 1936 Republican man-
of-the-hour presumably hinges on how he meets
that test.
In any event, Republican voters seem to have
beaten the senator to it in proposing virtual
coalition action on necessary recovery legislation.
Regardless of what official figures may show as to
party gains or losses in popular vote, the extent
to which elected Republicans stand committed to
support some of the Roosevelt policies is a novel
feature of the political situation. Senator Vanden-
berg himself is a striking example.
NE IMPORTANT factor in that political situa-

Play Production's HIT
"THE ROYAL
FAMILY"
By
George Kaufman and-Edna Ferber
TONIGHT and SATURDAY
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Admission 35c - 50c - 75c
For Reservations, Call 6300

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Ball
presents
Al Kavelin
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Book Cadillac Orchestra
Friday - November 30th
Michigan League

I

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9:30 to 1:30

Tickets $3.50

Class Spirit
Degenerated..,.

i

17

2

LASS SPIRIT, after a lapse in in-
tensity for several years, came back
on the Michigan campus this fall. It came back
so well, in fact, that it now stands a good chance
of being abolished or at least curtailed to a marked
degree in the years to come.
This result was not necessary, but it is due
directly to the manner in which the two lower
classes conducted themselves during the period
preceding the fall games. It ,should be entirely
possible for the freshman and sophomore classes
to pass through a period of spirit raising in prep-
aration for the games without descending to tactics
to which it would be a dignity to be called
"high school stuff."
The University has found it necessary to dis-
cipline one freshman and reprimand another for
their activities during the fight period. One was
guilty of breaking into a sorority house, the other,
as captain, of not controlling his group. It is easily
understandable that no actual harm might have
been meant by the students in the mob, not only
here but at the scenes of the other depredations
as well, for there were others, but we hope the
incident will prove to be indicative of the danger
of arousing reckless mob spirit.
It is expected that the University Committee
on Student Conduct will formulate some rules
regarding the future conduct of the games period.
As this has proven necessary, it is to be desired,
but it is further to be hoped that school spirit
will not die at Michigan merely because students
are not allowed to raise any particular kind of
hell 'that they so desire.

N

I nterneships
In Government. .

T E NEED OF a practical opportu-
nity for study of our national gov-
ernment which has long been expressed by stu-
dents of political science seems to be satisfied
at last with the announcement by the National
Institution of Public Affairs of their plans for
"interneships in practical government."
Briefly, the program consists of allowing spe-
cially selected students to spend February and
March of next year in Washington studying all
departments of the Federal government under the

9

II

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