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November 18, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-18

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PAGE FOU$

THE M ICHI G AN IDAILY

- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4-

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
Associated ollegiate ress
=934 f Djest 193s E
MANSOMWSCONSIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated-Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General..
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925,
MANAGING EDITOR..............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR... :::..:.......*JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL. DIRECTOR ... .......RALPH G. rCOULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ...................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHTEDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger; Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulirer, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois Ding, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger. Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER...........ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Blttman, John Park,
F. Allen Upson, Willis Tomlinson, Homer Lathrop,'Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock.
WOMEN'SASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig,' Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL J. ELLIOTT

Answers To The
TAXi Problem .. .
N THE PAST WEEK Ann Arbor has
awakened to the import of the
taxicab ordinance which the City Council will con-
sider on final reading tomorrow night - an ordi-
nance which would restrict competition and stand-
ardize taxi rates at their present high level.
The issue has come up because at least three
local companties believe that they can provide
satisfactory transportation at lower prices. The
Daily, in the interest of the student body, is anxious
that recognition be given their view that lower
prices can and should be charged.
Student trade constitutes approximately 85 per
cent of Ann Arbor's taxi business, and, we believe,
student trade should receive primary considera-
tion in any revision of taxi rates. Under the present
system, the student is definitely not receiving a
square deal.
Most "campus" hauls can be made profitably at
lower prices, and advocates of a downward revision
in the rate schedule claim that business would be
increased to such an extent that both students
and the cab companies would benefit.
This, then, is The Daily's plan:
First, that the rate-standardization ordinance
be not adopted by the City Council, because it
would be in unfair restraint of trade and competi-
tion.
Second, that Council consult with representatives
of all local taxi companies and attempt to hear all
sides of the case. At present, apparently, it has not
done this.
Third, that some definite provision be made for
.lowering prices to students, who are now supporting
the bulk of cab operation in Ann Arbor.
This, of course, will not all come about tomorrow
night. But it will come in time, because it is the
just and the fair thing to do.

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
Here's an answer to the DOPE ON BIG TEN
BOYS sent in by A.O.A.
THE LOW-DOWN ON CO-EDS
The Madison co-eds are made, so we hear
From hills, and roadhouses and bottles of beer.
THE MICHIGAN CO-EDS ARE MADE, SO IT
SEEMS,
FROM FOND REMINISCENCE OF CHAMPION
TEAMS.
The gals from Purdue, if my memory serves
Are made from the usual angles and curves.
The Bloomington co-eds, who'll dance till they drop
Are made from a step that is more of a hop.
The type from Minnesota, if I have the dope,
Are made from a step that is more of a hope.
The Iowa co-eds, if I know their ilk,
Are likewise confected from underwear silk.
The gals from Chicago, one tells by their looks
Are made out of glasses and ponderous books.
The gals from Missouri one natch'lly thinks
Are made out of jelly and fountain pen inks.
The co-eds from Boulder (We move to the West):
All of the co-eds think they are made best.
The co-eds of Duke (We are now in the South)
Are made out of vowels and juleps and mouth.
The gals from McGill (We move to the North):
If three men were ample would make a fourth.
The women from colleg guarded by forts,
Byrn Mawr and Vassar are made out of sorts.
When some co-ed conscious young man ran an
ad in the University of Minnesota Daily asking for
Dutch treat dates, he received three responses
all agreeable.
One had a car, was a blonde an good looking
and dressed well. Another liked the proposition so
well she asked if the advertiser had a little Dutch
boy friend for her little Dutch girl friend.
*~ * * *
Vassar, according to a sociology professor at
Lehigh College, was founded by a brewer who
was trying to prove that women really could
be educated.
Here are a group that a columnist at the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma nomigates for the hall of
fame:
1. The professor who never kept his class late,
especially at noon.
2. The professor who never told the same joke
twice.
3. The professor who gave his Monday eight
o'clock a free cut when they came to class with
sleepy faces.
4. The contributor who didn't copy his jokes and
poems from humor magazines.
5. Santa Claus.
Washington
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" T'S A CASE OF "system, system,
who's got the system?" as far as the
future of literary college class elections is con-
cerned.
The Man in the Street will never again .have
such a golden opportunity to write his particular
Utopia for the benefit of Michigan's undergraduate
posterity. Given four score class positions, a dozen
or more possible electoral boards, any number of
impartial arbiters, 50 students who are interested
and 3,000 who ought to be, 365 days in the
year, and 12 inches in a foot, every student ought
to be able to think out his very own election plan.
The most complicated, of course, should win the
prize.
The old system of elections got so putrid that
even the Undergraduate Council and leaders of
political parties were stirred to action. Both came
forward with plans that involve participation on
behalf of everyone on campus whose name was
e'er heard in song or story. The Man in the
Street may never figure it all out, but he will still
get his sacred right to vote, and that's the big thing.
For if there is one thing that both the Under-
graduate Council and the politicoes agree upon, it
is that Michigan students must not be deprived of
the ballot -however emasculated - for it is the
living token of a democracy that will be upheld,
even over the doters' dead bodies.
Perhaps the Man in the Street should cheer the
inspired decision by which he is allowed to flip
the coin that will decide which of the Electoral
Board's two or more candidates will reign over
him. He's more likely to discover that the new
system has lost all the zestful good sportsmanship
of the political campaign but none of the under-
cover maneuvers that good little boys and girls
deplore.
The element of blind man's bluff injected into
the election picture by withholding the names of
candidates until the morning of the voting adds
a charming final touch. Thus, only in rare and
unforseen cases will the best man be elected. Every-
thing possible will be done to make sure that the
voting student knows nothing about the election,
on the theory that what he doesn't know can't
hurt him.
Let's be honest. If certain class positions are
worth having, they are worth filling with the best

Lettrs published in this column should not be
contrued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief. the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
aOut Of The Fog
To the Editor:
In this column on Thursday was expressed a
justified disgust at what happened last Monday in
Hill Auditorium in the name of Armistice Day, but
the writer was hardly fair to Rabbi Heller, who let
in some clean air on a dismal performance.
Reverend Lynch merely led us in the "Our
Father . . .", which if not a war blessing, in the
mouths of uniforms, is at least unnecessarily non-
committal. Mr. Bills sang beautifully, but only to
invoke Kipling's ancient Thunder God, "Lord of
our farflung battle line . . .". The speaker leaned
backward to please the military, and mouthed con-
ventional Christianity's cheerfully dull assurances
that death is unimportant-it isn't so bad to die
young, it seems, if you have really lived. And they
died for, their country. They died, but cheer up,
death is not the end.
(I went there with the words from "All Quiet ..."
burning my head; "Bombardment, barrage, cur-
tain fires, mines, gas, tanks, machine guns, hand
grenades-words, words, but they hold the horror
of the world.. . The days, the weeks, the years out
here shally come back again and march with us, our
heads shall be clear, we shall have a purpose, and
so we shall march, our dead comrades beside us, the
years at the Front behind us:-against whom,
against whom?" Are there none but the dead to
march against those who, 16 years after, would try
to salve our memories with the ghosts of the war's
defunct idealisms?)
Rabbi Heller's benediction, which would ordin-
arily have been merely an appropriate final gesture,
cut into this fog like a fresh wind: "Grant us
peace, Thy most gracious gift, oh Thou Eternal
Source of Peace, and enable us to be a messenger
of peace unto the peoples of the earth. Endow us
with that critical faculty which will enable us to
see the brutality and selfishness of those who agi-
tate for war, except it be, and it be truly, for de-
fensive purposes. Help us to realize how much
the doct'ine of the Fatherhood of God is a sham
unless it carry with it the corollary of the Brother-
hood of man ..."
If you are an utter pacifist you may cavil at the
word "defensive," but notice the word "truly," and
you can hardly call this a blessing on the last war.
Furthermore it only implies that if the war be truly
defensive then those who agitate for it are not
necessarily brutal and selfish. Let us be grateful
that in the service there was one call for peace.
K. B. L.
Disillusioned JMan
To the Editor:
This letter is from a greatly disillusioned and
disappointed student. The few ideals that I had
left are all gone, and I am now nothing but an
individual that takes everything as it comes with-
out giving any thoughts about their improvement.
The cause of this disillusionment is an infamous
campus political scheme. The sophomore election
capped the climax. It is practically unbelieveable to
realize the low, dishonest political tricks tried at
this University. Michigan, supposedly a home of
culture and refinement, is the scene of some of
the worst of big-city political tactics.
It was with great pleasure that I saw the sopho-
more ballot thrown out. I was quite active in one
of the major parties and when I saw some of the
disgusting tricks that our opponent pulled I was
quite disappointed. It may be true that some of
our cohorts did the same things but it was not
brought to my attention and was entirely unsanc-

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READ THE MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

210 South Ashley

NOW READY and MORE LOVELY THAN EVER

The 49th Edition of the

do

MICHIGAN AENA
With artistic cover and twelve photogravure plates of the principal
University Buildings and tied with Michigan Colors- Enclosed

Dial 21al713

f

By SIGRID ARNE
EMMA REH, the chemist, is back in town after
explorations in South America. She brings a
story about a new antidote for the guest who stays
too late.
At an evening affair she was sitting near Gen.
Rafael Nogales of Venezuela, she recounts, when
she heard a vague buzzing.
The general rose immediately to say his "good-
byes." It seems he carries a pocket alarm watch
which goes off promptly at 11 p.m.
Dolly Gann, sister of former Vice-President
Curtis, had to pay a $2 parking ticket.
But, if she needed it, the incident gave her
proof of her Negro chauffeur's complete loy-
alty.
He looked crestfallen as the traffic officer
made out a ticket for him. As he took it he pro-
tested, "Ain't you Democrats got enough yet?"
THE NEW "BABY" Senator-Elect Rush D. Holt
of West Virginia, finally obtained the birth-
day present he wanted to give his mother.
Her birthday falls on Nov. 6.
He had promised her a senator for a son.
WVHEN the Supreme Court justices move to their
new majestic building, the old chamber will
be preserved as a shrine.
It recalls the winter of 1893 when rumors spread
that the statues of justices which line the room
moved and talked after dark. Some Capitol em-
ployes refused to go near the room after dusk.
Then John Montgomery Wright, marshal of the
court, had the courage to investigate. He found that
swinging lights outside the capitol produced the
illusion of movement among the statues.
ENRY P. FLETCHER, chairman of the Repub-
lican National Committee, was talking to
friends in a hotel lobby here after election day.
There walked past them a woman who said
rather loudly to her companions, "Is that the poor,
miserable Mr. Fletcher?"
Ths Republican chairman swung on his heel.

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