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September 25, 1934 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LGE TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUEBDA
sororities Enter Upon Extensive Rushing Season, Entertainin

Y, SEPTEMBER 25, 1934
Daily

Welcomes Students

In greeting the foreign students'
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, Counsellor.
to Foreign Students, and the Uni-
versity extend their welcome. The
University regards them as the unoffi-
cial ambassadors of the countries
from which they come, and regards
the courtesies extended to them as
expressions of its good will toward
the countries they represent.
Michigan has a cosmopolitan tra-
dition that extends back almost to
the founding of the University.
Through its foreign alumni it has
made important contributions to the
world movements of the past half
century or more.
For you, says Professor Nelson, who
must meet and solve even more baf-
fling problems in the future and
must carry on, the University hopes
to provide a rich educational experi-
ence which shall prepare you to take
your places as wise, fearless leaders
when you return to your native lands.
with the Red Waistcoat," "A Still
Life," and "The Bathers." The still
a number, among them are "The Boy.
life is especially characteristic of the
common conceptions of this artist's
work.
Slit skirts are definitely the thing
these days. Instead of hobbing along
in tight skirts, which, incidentally are
the only kind that look at all well
with tunic blouses, the outdoor girl
can stride as vigorously as she pleases
now, thanks to the slit which appears
in back, front, or side.
Long dresses are slit sometimes as
far as the knee, and often the slit
lurks behind a long panel in the
back which lengthens into the train.

Many Chinese
Are Enrolled
In University
When ex-president Hoover return-
ed from the far east two weeks ago
there were approximately forty Chin-
ese students on board ship with him.
All these were arriving to attend the
University of Michigan for the firstI
time.
The increase in the number of
foreign students this year is enor-
mous. More than one hundred Chin-
ese have enrolled so far, forming the
largest number ever in the University
at one time. Of these students, the
majority are enrolled in the graduate
schools, having had their preparatory
education in such outstanding native
universities as Lignan and St. Johns'
Universities at Shanghai.
The near east as well as the far
east will be well represented this year
having enrolled more students than
in years previous. Turkey will be
represented by eight new students
and Russia will contribute two more
new to help continue the cosmopoli-
tan tradition that has prevailed in
he University for many years.
Russell - Trueblbod
Wedding Performed
The marriage of Mis Louise True-
blood, '35, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.:
Bryan C. Trueblood of Freeport, Ill.,
and granddaughter of Mr. Thomas
Trueblood, Professor Emeritus of
public speaking, to Joe O. Russell, Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Russell of
Louisville, Ky., was solemnized Sat-
urday noon in the League chapel.
Rev. C. D. Pearson of Detroit per-
formed the service before about 90
guests. Barbara Ann Trueblood, sis-
ter of the bride, was maid of honor.
Daniel Duncan Russell acted as best
man.
The bride wore a brown chiffon
velvet suit with a metal cloth blouse.
Following the service a breakfast was
served.
THREE-PIECE DESIGN POPULAR
The classic three-piece design is
still with us. The novel features are
the knee-length of the topcoat and
the plaid with which it is lined and
bound. While the swagger coat of
the two-piece suit has taken on a
butcher-boy silhouette, belted in front
and flaring behind.

Lower Heels For Street And
Dress Is Latest Fashion Dictum
Shoes have been taken for granted English sport garb that is so popular.
to a great extent in the past, but Dress shoes seem to have a touch
this fall originality seems to be the of patent leather in the trimming or
keynote. Designers have combined have heels of the shiny leather. Suede
new materials with unique designs is again used. There is nothing more
and have evolved practical shoes that dressy than the low cut T-strap san-
possess striking individuality. dal, while a slim pump follows closely.
Freshmen women this year seem There is the high heeled dress oxford
to have taken advantage of the for afternoon wear. Gold and silver
smart trend of lower heels for street kid is effectively used as trimming for
wear. The heel is not flat, but is the dress shoe.
lower than the Cuban. It is usually a The formal shoe is an important
built up heel of uncovered leather. item of every woman's wardrobe. It
Brown suede, rough kid, patent is advisable to have one pair of shoes
leather and fabric, and pigskin com- of silver or gold that will go with
prise the materials used for this type two or three formals. If you possess
of thing. The vamp is a shorter one several pairs each pair can be tinted
than in previous years and the ox- to match a particular gown. The tall
ford, disguised in many clever ways, is woman is particularly blessed this
what it is called. The shoes are made year, since the latest evening shoes
to be worn with suits with long coats, have appeared with a medium heel
with butcher boy coats, and the loose and are incredibly smart in a low-
cut sandal.
Chapel Is Scene Of
Doty-Wortley Rites Lutheran Students Will
D y o l Rt Hear Slosson Speak
Last Wednesday in the League The first meeting of the Stu-
Chapel, E. William Doty of the School dents' Guild of the Zion Lutheran
of Music faculty and Miss Elinor Church will be held on Sunday, Sep-
tember 30 at 5:30 o'clock at the Zion
Roberts Wortley were united in mar- Lutheran Parish. Prof. Preston Slos-
riage. son, of the History Department, will
Mr. Doty is the son of Rev, and speak on the subject, "The Church
Mrs. William Doty, Portland. Rev. as Promoter." Karl Beck, '35, is in
Doty presided at the ceremony charge of the arrangements. Everyone
which was read before a small group is invited to attend.
of relatives and friends. Mrs. Doty
is from Walkerville, the daughter. of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Wortley.
Miss Marion Lamb, Grand Rapids,
sorority sister of Mrs. Doty, was maid
of honor. Both the bride and Miss
Lamb wore informal suits in brown.
Dr. Frederick Lemke, Tiffin, Ohio, EXCLUSIVELY
acted as best man with Oscar Marzke, E. Liberty at Fourth
Lansing, organist.
Mrs. Doty is a graduate of the ONCE MORE SOL ICI
University, receiving her degree in
arts in 1931 and in music in 1932. OF M I C H IG/
She is a member of Pi Beta Phi sor-
ority. Mr. Doty completed his work W
on his Doctors in Philosophy this and get acquainted with ou
summer, and dinners. Try our T-Bc
Mr. Doty will continue his work as dinners.
organist and instructor of theory
with the School of Music. The couple Meal Tickets, $3.25 at $3.00 a
will reside in Forest Plaza.

l
t

TO HOLD OPEN HOUSE
An Open House for all old and new
students will be held on Friday eve-
ning, Sept. 28, at 8:30 at the Zion
Lutheran Parish. Alton Hewett, '37,
is in charge of the entertainment,
and all interested are cordially invit-
ed to attend.

PARTICULAR BEAUTY AIDS
TO REFLECT YOUR PERSONALITY...
* expert hair-cutting.
* permanent waving.
* all lines of beauty work.
DiMattia Beauty Shop
Over The Parrot Telephone 8878

t"1, Ft
C ". 0*/
KS

HOSIERY FOR ALL
69c to $1.25 pr.
We Stock Only First Quality
We repair Hose for 25c each
regardless of number of runs or snags
LAURA BELLE SHOP

315 South State

L

41%

1869

1934

N

65 Years of Service
Since 1869 this bank has been serving Ann
Arbor, its townspeople, faculty, and its stu-
dents. It has always offered unexcelled serv-
ice, and will continue to be Ann Arbor's
leading financial institution.

The first few days may keep you in a
whirl . . . but try and come in and
see the new Connie and Jacqueline
shoes ... you'll find the new gabar-
dines and suedes trimmed perfectly
with leather in fascinating ways ...
and the gold and silver evening san-
dais are something to write home
about! Drop in and see them !

"The Deposits in this bank are insured by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation in the manner and to

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