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November 13, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MI+CHMAN DAILY

4

PAGE SIX TIlE MICIIIGANDATLY

Students Hurt
As Automobile
And Bus Crash
Injured Go To Hospital;
Dunham Unhurt As His'
Car Overturns

Fear Board Leader

Blakeman Ends
Conference Of
Y.M.C.A.Heads

Wisconsin Or Illinois To
Be Host At Conference
Next Spring

Eight students were injured yester-
day noon when a bus owned by the:
Ann Arbor Transportation Co. and
driven by John Marz in which they
were riding. collided at the intersec-
tion of Baldwin and Cambridge Roads4
with a car driven by Prof. Arthurr
L. Dunham of the history department. I
The bus was proceeding east on
Cambridge and Professor Dunham'sI
car south on Baldwin when the ac-
cident occurred. Both cars were over-
turned, and that of Professor Dun-
ham thrown up on the lawn of the 1
house on the southeast corner of the
intersection.
Pearl Ward, 1938 Washtenaw, mostI
seriously injured of those on the bus I
was taken to St. Joseph Hospital suf- -Associated Press Photo
fering from a fractured scapula and Marriner S. Eccles, 44, assistant sec-
cuts. Arthur Miller, '38, Toledo, was retary of the treasury and a staunch
pinned beneath the bus and was taken adv-cate of administration policies,
to the University Hospital with bruises I was named governor of the Federal
and lacerations, as was Melvin Kemp- Rluerve Board by President Roosevelt.j
ner, Jr., '35, Little Rock, Ark., who was

The conference of the presidents of
the Y.M.C.A. associations in the Big
Ten schools closed Sunday noon at
the League. Dr. E. W. Blakeman, re-
ligious counselor to students, led the
discussion of the last session.
Russell F. Anderson, '36, president
of the Student Christian Association,
stated that "the conference was a
succe'ss in every way." Plans are un-
der consideration to bring the group
together again in May. It will prob-
ably meet either at the University of
Wiscqnsin or on the campus of the
University of Illinois. Edwin Wilkie
of Wisconsin was appointed manager
of the spring conference.
The problems confronting -the dele-
gates were brought up and such topics
as the student budget, social pro-
gram, relation of the Y.M.C.A. asso-
ciation to other campus activities, and
service work were discussed.
In the earlier discussions Prof.
Robert Cooley Angell and the Rev.
Alfred Lee Klaer participated. All
sessions were held at Lane Hall and
the League.
Delegates present were: Robert C.
Johnson, Richard Bauer, Clifford
Pruefer, Robert W. Bishop, Ralph
Hileman, Jack Bricker, Milton Bovey,
Harold K. Cheney, Channing Wil-
liams, William Byrne, Edwin Wilkey,
William Kady, George Abernathy,
Lawrence Quinn.

cut on the head and face.
Cyrus Klein, '37, Detroit, and James
Eckhouse, '38, Chicago, were also
taken to St. Joseph's Hospital. Klein
was cut on the head and Eckhouse
above the eye. After treatment Eck-
house was released.
Seymour Morrison, '38, Waukegan,

Guthe Returns
To University
From Alabama.

Ill., Henry Bachrach, '38, Decatur Ill,
and Henry Grier, '38, Decatur, Ill.,
were taken to the University Health
Service. Morrison suffered a sprained
wrist, Bachrach a head cut, and Grier
minor cuts and bruises. All were re-
leased after treatment.
Other passengers in the bus who
were shaken up were Richard L. Co-
hen, '38, Shaker Heights, Ohio, Robert
S. Watel, '38, Ligonier, Ind., and Ben
Pollock, '37.
Stu'dents riding in the bus quickly
righted the machine, releasing Miller
who was pinned beneath it. He had
been riding on the outside of the car.
Neither driver was injured.
The accident is the second to occur
at that intersection within a week.
Russian Trip
Recounted To
Vanguard Club
Mrs. R. W. Sellars Tells
Group Russian Advance
Is 'Incredible'
The high spots of her study trip
to Russia last summer were recount-
ed recently by Mrs. Roy W. Sellars,
wife of Prof. Roy W. Sellars of the
Philosophy Department, at a meet-
ing of the Michigan Vanguard Club
in the Union. Her subject was "The
Russian Paradox."
The paradox in present-day Rus-
sia, according to Mrs. Sellars, lies in
the fact that the ideal for which its
leaders are striving is minimum con-
trol of individuals by government,
while the existing government is just
the opposite.
"Incredible" was the word Mrs.
Sellars used to describe the advances
Russia has made since the Revolu-
tion. "Although in 1917 no less than
90 per cent of the people were il-
literate, this condition has almost
been entirely wiped out," she said.
In further describing the educa-
tional system, Mrs. Sellars declared
that college students have a choice
of several jobs awaiting them, and
make their selection in time to spend
their last year in the university in
training for this position.
GO TO BAY CITY MEETING
Emory Hyde, president of the Alum-
ni Association, Coach WhiteP Wistert,
and Football Manager George Duffy
tonight will attend a meeting of the
University Club of Bay City.

Dr. Carl E. Guthe, director of the
Museum of Anthropology, will resume
lhis classes today, after a six-week's1
leave of absence in Alabama.

Twenty Years Ago
From the Daily files of
November 13, 1914

Dr. Guthe was granted leave by
the Board of Regents to conduct. a
course in "North American Archae-
ology and Its Methods" at Birming-
ham Southern College, Birmingham,
Ala. The lectures, which were given
three nights a week from Oct. 1 to
Nov. 10, were supplemented by actual
field laboratory work carried on atI
an Indian mound site at Bessemer,
Ala. A special excursion was made
to the Alabama Museum of Natural
History owned by the University of
Alabama, and the Indian ruins at
Moundville.
The field work consisted of the ex-
vacation of a stone grave burial, the
foundations bof an Indian house, and
the recording of strategraphical rec-
ords indicating that one of the three
mounds in this archaeological site
had been occupied at least three suc-
cessive times.
The course carried with it three
hours of college credit and was recog-
nized in the curriculum for the teach-
er's certificate.
Dr. Guthe reports that he had a
fine time, and that conditions in
Alabama are "just about like they
are everywhere." He says he is glad
to be back.
Allen Attends Park
MeetingAt Capitol
Prof. Shirley W. Allen of the School
of Forestry and Conservation left
recently for Washington on official
business. Professor Allen went to
Washington at the request of the
National Park Service to attend a
conference of the forestry technicians
assigied to the Eastern Nationalj
Parks.
The conference will concern itself
with the going over of plans for con-
tinued emergency conservation work
in the parks. Professor Allen served
last summer as a special inspector of
forestry projects in the Pacific Coast
groups of National Parks.
He intends to return to Ann Arbor
at the beginning of next week.

j

William Jennings Bryan, secretary
of state, has finally definitely prom-
ised to come to Ann Arbor and address
the Y.M.C.A. boys' conference meet-
ings in ill Auditorium this month.
Plate glass windows were smashed
and quantities of goods taken by a
riotous crowd, mostly students, which
stormed the store of "Joe" Reinger,
on State street last night. The action
came as a result of exposures show-
ing that Reinger had plotted to bribe
members of the football team in
order to benefit himself financially
by wagers.

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You can no longer afford to send your
laundry home. Our ROUGH DRY (semi-
finish) bundle for students is far more
economical than any other laundry serv-
ice. This gives you finished laundryon
shirts, handkerchiefs, and socks. Under-
wear and pajamas are washed, dried and
ironed ready for wear.

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James R. Angell, son of President-
Emeritus James B. Angell, and dean
of the faculties of the University of
Chicago, has been offered the pres-
idency of the University of Washing-
ton.
Initiations of ten neophytes were
administered last night by the
Sphinx. The ceremony which took
place in the open attracted a crowd
of several hundreds.
FRIENDLY
S E R V I C E
Come to the Bismarck
for luxurious comforf

Price per Pound.
(Minimum Bundle - SOc )
Sox, Extra, pair
Handkerchiefs, Ex=
ShtE
h i rs, Exra .-

Era

lOc
2c

*.IC

. .. good food ... and
that elusive some-
thing called "friendly
service" that makes
you feel rightathome.
Every modern hotel
convenience is here
at your beck and call.
Rooms with bath, x$3.50 up.
Rooms without bath, $2.50.
Write for booklet with
map of Chicago.

o "lOc

Full Dress Shirts not included in this Service

SAMPLE BUNDLE

Those EXTRAS needed
in a man's room can be
purchased at
Chas. Doukas - Haberdashery
1319 South University

- t
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6
3
2
2
1

SHIRTS
HANDKERCHIEFS
PAIRS OF SOX
SUITS UNDERWEAR
BATH TOWELS
PAJAMA SUITS

FINISHED
SERVICE
WASHED- - DRIED
FOLDED
READY TO WEAR

TOTAL COST 92c

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For This New ROUGH DRY SERVICE, Call any of the following Laundries:
HITE SWAN LAUNDRY KYER LAUNDRY
Phone 4117 Phone 4185

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