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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-11

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_______1_ ______ FHFE M IC H ICG A N' DAILY s ar

)V

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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I

Published every morning except Monday durig the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
Gnd the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBEFR
55 atttted ( e litt
I'IAt D I $O W W S C O H 51N
' LEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS_
The Associated Press is exclusively entfiled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches .credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. Allrights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved."
Entered at the' Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan,'as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during sumier byr carrier, ,$00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school, year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices : Student Publicatiis 1uilding, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Plr6ne: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Servic , Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michlghn Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF .
Tepone 4925;
MANAGING EDITOR ... ...WILLIAM G..FERS
CITY ITOR...................JOHN HEAEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR..........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR........R.........rEE CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR ,.'... ..ELjENOR'BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. EliDtt Da John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E~. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David 'G. 'Ma~doriald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis,"William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. OAtho t, RoaneitPulver, Lloy 85 Reich, Mr-
shall Sibulman, Donald Smith, Bernard 'Weissman,, Jacob
C.Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fredr Busen,
Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith,, Harriet... athaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Sela Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger. Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINF" STAFF
BU8INESS MANAGER . .RUSS B.. READ
OREDlIT MANAd .............ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER..........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Servicej Department, Be'ard Rosenthal; Contrac'ta,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hardenbrook, John Park, F. Allen Upson,' Willis Tom-
linson, Homer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe.
WOMEN'SASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Marg retta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth icke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, J.uly Trosper.
NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR M. TAUB

Life Is A
Gamble...
AMBLING IS WRONG in principle.
But just the same, it's fascinating
business - as long as you don't count the cost.
Pickem Pool passed out of the University pic-
ture amid quite a flurry of unfavorable publicity.
It was a dishonorable racket - imagine! It refused
I to pay the winners.
One racket, however, has come to stay. Nothing
has fastened itself upon the imagination of the
drug store and lunch roo'm cowboys like the varied
and ever-increasing forms of the shoot-for-the-
hole machine. They offer all the sporting thrills of
a child's game, pay a.winner often enough, and
afford excellent fun at such a small price.
Interviews with various restaurateurs and stare
owners in Champaign-Urbana disclosed the aver-
age weekly winnings for the owner were $25. Given
about 25 machines in the campus area, Illinois
students and .others - but mostly students - were
spending $625 a week to get a little thrill out
of life.
It doesn't take much further figuring to show
that. a week's takings ,would put one student
through a year of school nicely, and the year's
lasses would educate 40 or more in better style
than many are accustomed to right now.
Wasn't the depression terrible?

Armistice Day,
1934. . *

Aftermath
By SIEGFRIED SASSON
Have you forgotten yet? ...
For the world's events have rumbled on since
those gagged days,
Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing
of city ways:
And the haunted gap in your mind has filled
with thoughts that flow
Like clouds in the lit heavens of life; and
you're a man reprieved to go,
Taking your peaceful share of Time, with
joy to spare.
But the past is just the same - and War's
a bloody game-'
Have you forgotten yet? .. .
Look down, and swear by the slain of the
War that you'll never forget.
Do you remember the dark months you
held the sector at Mometz -
The nights you watched and wired and dug
and piled sandbags on parapets?_
Do you remember the rats; and the stench
Of corpses rotting in front of the front line
trench,-
And dawn coming, dirty white, and chill
with a hopeless rain?
Do you ever stop and ask, "Is it all going to
happen again?"
Do you remember that hour of din before the
attack -
And the anger, the blind compassion that
seized and shook you then
As you peered at the doomed and haggard
faces of your men?
Do you remember the stretcher cases lurching
back
With dying eyes and lolling heads, those
ashen gray
Masks of the lads who once were keen and
kind of gay?
Have you forgotten yet? ...
Look up,.and swear by the green of the spring
that you'll never forget.

A s ot esS tStraight From The Shoulder
AS STUDENT PACIFISTS prepare for the gen-
eral anti-war meeting and R.O.T.C. boys and
"long-haired radicals" confuse issues as they
wrangle over their own particular brand of mili-
tarism, the campus has been hearing some
"straight goods." Sen. Gerald P. Nye, who, as chair-
man of the recent Senatorial investigation com-
mitee, :should be in a position to know the true
facts, fired some rather damning blasts at the
righteous'right when he spoke here Thursday.
"A device for creating jingoistic and false pat-
riots," he called the R.O.T.C.. Similarly he dis-
posed of the C.M.T.C.. "There is a definite attempt
to inculcate the spirit of war into universities and
schools by munitions industries," he charged.
These definite statements should end the anom-
olous position of those "peacemakers in khaki"
who insist on taking part in anti-war demonstra-
tions while wearing uniforms issued by the War
Department.
But Senator Nye painted the picture 'much
bleaker. "Gold of the munitions manufacturers is
buying the press, radio, and statesmen of the
world" was his indictment. He envisioned a clever
network enmeshing world propagandizing facilities
for the direct benefit of war profiteers.
Constructively, the senator is rather optimistic.
Though his expectation that the investigation com-
mittee will receive a $50,000 grant to carry on its
work next session does not sound too improbable,
such suggestions as the one that the government
should levy a war income tax of 98 per cent on
earned incomes above $10,000 and that war supply
sales to other nations be placed on a "cash and
carry" basis seem to be expecting just a little too
much of the present political setup.
However, exaggerated as his political picture and
his attempts at reform may sound, Senator Nye
has given some invaluable advice con erning cur-
rent conditions. His belief that the h toric policy
of flag-waving will not suffice to make America
enter a war should be remembered when the device
is actually tried. His insistence on the insidiousness
of war propaganda should be brought to mind when
the pacifistic inclinations of the R.O.T.C. are loudly
insisted.
Because no matter how it's disguised and ration-
alized, war cannot rise out of its own grisly non-
necessity.
-The Wisconsin Daily Cardinal.
Legion Berates College Youth
ARE COLLEGE PACIFISTS as superficial and
silly as they were said to be recently in an edi-
torial in The Nebraska Legionnaire? The editor of
that publication accuses them of being postoffice
and bridge players, and finding as their chief occu-
pations cheering of football teams, and loafing in
luxurious fraternity houses. He seems to take it for
granted that one must go through the torture of
trench warfare before he knows anything about.the
folly of international holocausts and the dirty
conniving of munitions makers. Furthermore, the
average student of 1934 finds little time to play
postoffice and bridge.
Admittedly college pacifists are often too impul-
sive in acting, and fail to grasp the relative impor-
tance of various points in the peace program. They
are also often too impatient, lack foresight, and
spoil their own programs by acting too hastily.
Their elders, however, can't condemn them for lack
of foresight, because they themselves have shown
that trait all too many times.
American Legion men are in a position where
they very naturally become resentful of outside
declarations as to war. They feel that they, of all
people should and do know what a hell war is.
Men can't be blamed for fighting for an ideal.
They were deceived by circumstance and propa-
ganda. They thought they would save the world for
democracy, and very likely some day we of this
generation will be deceived by some similar high-
sounding slogan. By educating ourselves in the sub-
ject of war, its causes, results, and general futility,
we of the younger generation hope to avoid being
deceived.

Our hats are off to you former service men. You
fought because your ideals told you to. What youth
wishes to do is to prevent another war. The
Nebraskan editor's personal opinion concerning the
refusal to fight under any conditions is that such

COLLEGIATE
O BSE RVE R
By BUD BERNARD
Michigan co-eds are complaining about the
hours they have to observe. Look at this excerpt
from Houghton College:
"All women are requested to be in their rooms in
the evening after 7:00 o'clock and lights are to be
out at 10 o'clock. Girls over 21 years of age are
permitted to have extension of time one night a
week .-"
A PROFESSOR LOOKS AT HIS CLASS
Well, there they sit, the dumb, dim-witted saps-
Collegiate fops in corduroy and leather,
Their idiotic minds first fixed on whether
I'll catch them reading Ballyhoo on their laps.
--The women trying hard to look the parts
Of chic I'm-oh-so-bored sophisticates-
Some cross their legs at handsome addlepates.
And hope that another 'college romance' starts.
Concerned with dances, clothes, and football teams,
What do they care for what I have to say?
They're patronizing - there's not one who dreams
I might be just as bored as they
Pretend to be. This is a lousy way
To make a living. Lord, I earn my pay.
Two dollars.fine per head was put on 62 students
of Queens College for hazing freshmen by rbbing
rotten eggs and overripe tomatoes on their heads.
Very reasonable price, a bargain we would say.
After much consideration we have voted this
week's "boner" prize to a professor at Clemson
College who rushed into an empty classroom,
cursed the class for cutting, and then discov-
cred he had come to an eight o'clock instead
of a nine.
A new organization has sprung up on the Purdue
campus. It is appropriately called the "Holding The
Bag Club." The organization of this novel club
grew out of the Purdue Men's habit of taking the
co-eds to the well-known mixers on the campus.
If the man takes a co-ed to a mixer and she in turn
invites someone else to her house dance, he auto-
matically becomes a member of the club. If the
Purdue columnist is not lying; about 50 per cent of
the men on the campus have memberships in the
club.
They are talking about the poor frosh at
Ohio State University who always tried to date
blondes so that his fraternity brothers would
think he was a gentleman.
Here's another excerpt from the catalogue of
our "institutions of liberal education." This is
from a small eastern school.
"The degree to which the tobacco habit is fasten-
ing itself upon the boys and girls of the present
age is appalling. Its blighting effects on body,
mind and morals are seen on every hand, needing
no argument to show that a student who wishes
to be at his best must leave it alone. Students
who are either addicted to the use of tobacco or
alcoholic liquors are requested not to register
until they have tried and found out they can ab-
stain."
1 - Y

- Cotering to Your Better Taste -
CREAM WAFFLES--- LUNCHEONS - DINNERS
MAYFLOWER Restaurant
Cor. East Street and South 4th Avenue - Ann Abor

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PICTURES.-~
that pas sin the
NIGHT
are gone forever!
Record them! Home,
Children, Parties . .
The most "remembera-
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Eastman's New S. S.
film.

ii

--- - ------

Washington
Off The Record

By SIGRID ARNE
A MBASSADOR HIROSHI SAITO of Japan ar-
rived back in Washington to the accompaniment
of much formal Oriental bowing from the large
reception committee.
He returned the bows, and then turned a worried
eye on his luggage, smiling brightly when he
spotted a large, square object.
"Ah, there it is," he said.
"It" was two crates of strawberries which the
ambassador bought in California, and which he
had been mentally eating all the way across the
continent.
Much ermine but few orchids are worn by
smart Washington women to formal evening
affairs.
They consider the gardenia in better taste
than the orchid.
JOSEPH H. CHOATE, JR., chairman of the Fed-
eral alcohol control administration, has an
understanding with his assistant, Harris E. Wil-
lingham.
One or the other must be in the office all the
time.
Choate left for late lunch one day, promising
to be back so Willingham could keep a late after-
noon appointment. Choate never returned. The
next day he greeted Willingham with a grin and
remarked:
"In case you'd like to know, my grandmother
had a very successful funeral yesterday, thank
you."
Motorcycle cops assembled at the east gate
of the White House is always a signal for cur-
ious crowds. They gather to see the President
go out.
THE TAXI DRIVER grew tired of waiting outside
the very grand party "Jock" Whitney was giv-
ing to the Virginia hunting crowd. So he ambled
in, and up to the buffet.
Poking the man next to him, he whispered:
"These rich people don't know how to give a
blow-out, do they?"
He was speaking to Whitnev

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Get your indoor
ture information.

pic-
free

__ -
- ... :

on request.
& BOYCE
723 N. University

INVITED
You are cordially invited to come in Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday and talk over your
figure problems with
Miss Sally Staunton
Associate Stylist for the Creators of Artist Mod i
-the Customized Foundation.
Miss Staunton can help you by showing you just
how Artist Model foundations will give you a
glamorous, beautiful figure. It isn't difficult
with this nodern all-in-one foundation that
consists of two detachable pieces - bras and
girdle.
There's no charge for Miss Staunton's expert
counsel. Won't you plan to come in during her
stay?
From $6.50 up

IMPORTED
GRANULATED
TURF MULL
Outline of Its Uses
BULBS AND TUBERS

Mulch all Fall planted bulbs
with "GPM" Peat Moss 4 to 6
inches deep. In exposed places
the mulch should be covered
with evergreen boughs, bur-
lap or straw, to prevent the
strong winds from blowing it
away. Remove the mulch in the
Spring and use Peat Moss in
your other gardening work.

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