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November 04, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-04

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FOun

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER, 4, 1934

s

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
M EMBSER
&-mociated filegiEit W rQS
- 1934 eTjoesf 1935
dMASON WIScoNSIN
"MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled.to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mrail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives :National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR .............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR........... ............JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR:............RALPH G. COUJLTER
SPORTS EDITOR ................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS::John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna 'Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger. Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-1
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts.
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hardenbrook, John Park, F. Allen Upson, Willis Tom-
linson, Homer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper.
NIGHT EDITOR : PAUL J. ELLIOTT

i
i

they usually accept the responsibility of facing the
evil and pounding it into the public conscience.
That alone is a service.
Like every other good thing, destructive crit-
icism can be ovderdone. The fact that it has been
overdone in the past probably accounts for the
way it is discredited today. But to condemn de-
structive criticism as an absolute is as unintelligent
as it is popular.
Law Of
The Lawns .. .
EVERY MAN HOPES some day to be
able to delineate a cyclical law.
Three years of minute observation have enabled us
to proclaim ours, running something as follows:
November (any year): Buildings and Grounds
department, discovering certain displeasing bare
spots on campus lawns, plows them in prepara-
tion to spring planting.
April: B. and G. men work said ground care-
fully. sow precious grass seed.
May: Tender young grass makes first appear-
ance, is carefully watched.
July: Grass appears well on way to success, gets
first cutting.
September: First fall rains leave ground soft
and muddy; University trucks take opportunity to
make short cuts across lawns.
October: Ground continues wet and soft; more
trucks take short cuts; B. and G. workers assidu-
ously rake up every fallen leaf, reaping most of
grass as well.
November (this year should be no exception):
Certain bare spots on campus lawns become em-
barrassingly apparent; B. and G. boys hasten to
correct undesirable situation.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be briefthe editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Surprise Package
1 WISH TO EXPRESS my appreciation of the
quality of the editorials appearing in recent
issues. The editorial in Friday morning's Daily en-
titled "Evangelists in Education" is a very pene-
trating analysis. It is very easy for someone in
education to launch a program or formula in sky-
rocket fashion which leads the public to think that
the problem is actually solved when, as a matter
of fact, years and years of painstaking work
needs to be done either through experimentation
or investigation if any substantial change is to be
made in our schools.
-Raleigh Schorling.
A Wash Basin World?
To the Editor:
YOUR EDITORIAL on sororities set me thinking
as most editorials don't and introspectively
I argued thus:
Are we not all amoebas in some wash basin?
Is not the person rare who like Emerson can
refpise the persuasions of the Margaret Fullers
and Bronson Alcotts to join some Brook Farm?
Is this not why we have Communist and Demo-
cratic parties and churches and American Legions
and Boy Scouts and Campfire Girls and Sororities
and Fraternities and Labor Unions?
The size and color of the wash basin is a matter
of degree, isn't it? Does it make much difference
whether it is ivory and green or rusty red or merely
a tin thing on the back porch? Most of us would
be lost in a universe without a wash basin and
some of us haven't the mentality for a large one.
Hence few can rise above being like me.
-An Amoeba.
11 _ i

As Others See Iti

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER

By BUD BERNARD
Frances Perkins, lecturing at Purdue Univer-
sity last week, was telling about her nephew
at Princeton writing his first examination.
After he had filled his bluebook he discovered
on the last page the following: "I hereby swear
I have not received or given any assistanceI
in writing this examination. Signed."
Being a conscientious boy her nephew ap-
proached the ins'tructor, a wordly man, some-
what timidly and explained that he hesitated
to sign because the night before he prayed
to God for assistance.
The instructor glanced over the boy's paper
superficially, as only an instructor can, and
then said, "My boy, you can safely sign the
vow."
This column now turns to a little seriousness.
Again student opinion has been gagged in one
of our schools of "liberal education." Amid the
general Sinclair scarce in California it is signifi-
cant that Los Angeles Junior College has been
denied the privilege of holding a straw vote to
gauge student opinion. This ruling was made by'
the superintendent of Los Angeles schools and it is
responsible for the gagging of some 4,000 under-
graduates. This decision made by this authority
seems rather naive, for it certainly shows that,
he is either an "Epic" man who fears defeat orI
a stalwart supporter of the Republican party who
is afraid the plurality of socialist votes on the
college campus may sway all the voters in Califor-
nia.
Here's another one of those take-it-or-
leave-it stories. A history professor at Roan-
oke College says that many of his students
will be as famous as Napoleon at 'the rate
they are going down in his'tory.
The Daily Princetonian charges that Princeton
students, who are forced to attend Sunday chapel
services, 'play tic-tac-toe or read the sport edition
of the Sunday paper during the service.
Here's a poem sent in by
"TWO WHO HAVE SUFFERED"
If we could find a co-ed fair
(We realize this type is rare)
Who doesn't have to take a cab
Each time the skies are slightly drab,
Who doesn't think each date should be
Convention's sweet epitome,
As well as just another chance
To drag us to another dance
Or that offer of a cig
Is an excuse to be a pig
And slyly snitch the proffered pack
The moment one has turned his back.
If such a co-ed we could find,
We'd like to copyright her kind
And if she wears her dresses well
And has a sense of humor - h --
We don't care if she doesn't kiss us
.....................till Christmus.
FAMOUS LAST WORDS
Professor: "Stop sliding your feet and slam-
ming your books, I still have five more min-
utes." Student: "I'll meet you at 7:30 on the
library steps." Anybody: "I'm going to knock
that midsemester cold."
-,

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Intelligent
Destruction .
ALEXANDER POPE IS GUILTY of
having ventured the thought that
whatever is, is right. While he didn't mean that
his faith should.extend to man-made eccentricities,
his words made an admirable catch phrase and
they will be hung around his neck as long as he is
quoted.
Worshippers of the status quo, few of whom will
go as far as Pope is supposed to have gone, are
nevertheless very jealous of whatever is. For any
attack oil their philosophies, their handiest broad-
sword is the claim that such criticism is purely de-
structive, that it offers no program in solution of
the difficulties.
The hue and cry against destructive criticism
has been so convincing that our educational insti-
tutions have taken it up with as much fervor as
anyone else, and by the time one escapes the
system he knows that only radicals and dim-
brains are foolish enough to tear down that which
has been wrought.
When an editor is, upon occasion, so short-
sighted as to view with alarm some particularly
noxious situation, the majority of his readers are
apt to look askance. But for refutation they need
say only that he is merely negative, that he offers
no program. Thus simply is he put in his place'
The editor of the Daily Illini has been writing
vividly of late of what he considers some of the
most flagrant evils in the educational system.
What he has said has been dark and disturbing.
Much of it was true and it hurt. The Illini editor
was dubbed "the man who's mad at everything."
The Illini editor is capable of justifying himself
if anyone is, but many disillusioned readers will
never be convinced that he isn't a fool for criticiz-
ing existing institutions without offering better
substitutes.
There are plenty of unpleasant things that ought
to be shouted about whether the shouter can offer
a concrete solution or not. Some one or more of
his hearers, when sufficiently stirred up about the
matter will see the light and offer the much-
needed remedy. Or all of his hearers, once ade-
quately aroused, will be moved to the action that is
urgent but not always obvious.
For those who don't care to think too much about
the mean side of life, it's a very simple matter --
too simple - to assume the defense position of ex-
treme optimism. What sweetness and light there
is can easily be magnified into enough sweetness
ad liho. + hint nt 1 all 1cf 1',xand ahnormal are

I

Washington
Off The Record

.00

I',

By SIGRID ARNE

Let's Finish This Mess
ON NOV. 1 combine spokesmen will present before
the Student Senate functions which they be-
lieve should be placed in the hands of class officers.
If the senate approves these proposed duties, class
offices will continue on the campus. If the senate
fails to do so, class offices will be abolished.
We presume that any function which would re-
ceive the approval of the senate would necessitate
the election of capable students to the various
offices.
Yet the Scarlet and Gray and Buckeye combines
are not forming their slates with the purpose of
presenting candidates who are best fitted to act as
executives. Rather, the two political groups are
choosing each nominee on the basis of his or her
vote-getting ability.
If John Blank is a football star, that does not
mean he will make a capable senior class president.
Class presidents, if they continue to exist on the
campus, will be expected to do things other than
wear the Varsity "O" and have the ability to dash
50 yards or so for touchdowns.
This bickering and quarreling over whether an
"Eta" or a "Tri-Alp" should receive the nomina-
tion for the vice-presidency of the senior class
borders on the asinine. Excluding the combine
leaders and the principals, does anyone give a rap
who gets the nomination for that office? The nom-
inees for this particular office will be co-eds. That
strange thing the combiners call tradition seems to
decide that.
The same principles hold good for the secre-
4-, ; n nr ' ,nra i,,r,-c .XTh n o .-z , m n l +o. tth

EN. CARTER GLASS of Virginia had to appear
in public side-by-side with the tall, big Post-
master "Jim" Farley.
Glass looked up the great length of Farley and
told a story of two Virginia assemblymen with
whom he had served.
One was tall like Farley. One was short like
Glass.
One day the short one said to the tall one:
"Say, don't stand near me in public. You make a
reasonable man like me look downright squatty."
Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., loves the the-
ater - and she gets a double dose of it.
Her husband is too busy as secretary of the
treasury to take a chance on seeing a mediocre
performance.
So Mrs. Morgenthau goes to a new show to
"sample." If it is good, she goes back in a night
or two with her husband.
FOR FIVE MINUTES, 10 minutes, 15 minutes
Mrs. Daniel C. Roper, wife of the secretary of
commerce, looked up and down the street for herI
automobile and her chauffeur, tapping her foot onI
the curb. She had been attending a tea.
Then she suddenly remembered she had given
the chauffeur the wrong address.
She hopped into a taxi, and went to the "wrong
address" where she found her chauffeur patiently
waiting.
Proof that news spreads slowly arrived at
Hyde Park.
It was in the form of a letter addressed to
"The President of the United States, the Hon-
orable Theodore Roosevelt."
WILLIAM J. COLLINS is the white-haired, pink-
faced man who is called when somebody very
esnnria1 can't find asea t in the Husei alleries.

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