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November 01, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
s$ociat¢d oltegiate rrss
J934 e Igg1935 -
.Amso VWscoaS,
7IEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited In this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved,
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail. $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. -- 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Te.epho.e4925
MANAGING EDITOR..........WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR ..................... JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR...........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ........ ........ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER .............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER ...............ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT 'MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising ,David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted WohIgemuith, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hardenbrook, John Park, F. Allen Upson, Willis Tom-
linson, Homer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe..
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shaapland, Betty Sinonds,-Grace Snyder, Margaretta
K~ohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, etty Bowman, July Trosper.
NIGHT EDITOR : DAVID G. MACDONALD

Pickem Pool
Passes On...
E IGHT HUNDRED STUDENTS will
admit today that Barnum was right.
These are the students who bet an aggregate of
$304 on the football game selections of one Pickem
Pool, Cleveland, "insures payment of winners."
They won $2,115 on their choices but so far have
seen no sight of their filthy lucre or "unearned,
increment" as the economics department would say.
The Pickem Pool was only too glad to pay off the
winners when the amount won by the winners
didn't exceed the amount taken in, They even paid
up the week before last when the winners took
a $90 loss, but they evidently decided to fold up
when the smart-gambling Michigan students took
them for a loss of $1,811.
The reason, of course, that the Pickem company
lost so heavily on last Saturday's games was
because there wasn't one upset. The selections were
also rather easy, at least four of the games on the
list being between topheavy favorites and under-
dogs. Had Michigan converted against Illinois last
Saturday and the game ended in a tie, the Pickem
Pool would have been the heavy winner instead of
the students because the majority of the Mich-
igan students bet against the Maize and Blue. How-
ever, the Gods of Chance favored the students this
week and great rejoicing would have been preva-
lent in Ann Arbor had Pickem paid.
It's rather silly to tell students not to put their
money into such venturesome enterprises. Most of
them know that already. However, they may not
realize that the running out of such concerns as
the Pickem company when the losses become too
heavy was a common practice last week.
One company at the University of Minnesota re-
fused to pay off winners and several other com-
panies in Eastern colleges did the same.
The Pickem Pool has undoubtedly ruined its
status, on this campus. No one will buy tickets from
their agents, and for the present will probably
steer clear of all such schemes that are so fair on
the surface.
The local operator of the pool that was such good
fun while it lasted fortunately held onto the money
he took in here, so the fair name of Pickem may
not become quite as besmirched as that of kindred
enterprises.
As Others See It
German Scholarship Goes Nazi
PROFESSORS in German universities must alter
their views to fit those of the Nazi regime if
they expect to keep their positions. The conflict
of theories in controversial fields must cease, to
make way for supreme rule of the National Social-
ist philosophy. These tenets, in fact, are taught in
the universities today, and are applied to the most
remote fields of scholarship. Professors mold their
lecturet accordingly, or resign. Academic freedom?
Certainly, "if it is not misused to promulgate the-
ories and thoughts inimical to the life of the
nation." That "if" is broad enough to cover the
entire world of non-Nazi (not necessarily anti-
Nazi) thought.
The ukases recited above are not slanders against
Germany by persons out of sympathy with its pres-
ent government. They were laid down in a recent
address by Hans FTank, Nazi Commissar for the
judiciary and president of the German Law Acad-
emy.
There may have been some prsons who, while
sympathizing with the spirit which caused Harvard
to reject a $1,000 Nazi scholarship recently offered,
felt that the action might cause some student to
be deprived of educational privileges in one of
Germany's distinguished universities. The plight
of German education, as disclosed by the speaker
quoted, shows of how little real worth such a
scholarship would have been for a student inter-
ested in anything other than the Nazi ideology.
-St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Study Abroad
HERE has been some discussion lately in aca-
demic circles on the advantages of including
foreign study in the undergraduate curriculum.

The latest discussion appears in the editorial col-
umns of the Harvard Crimson. The" Cambridge
journal gives the plan a hearty approval.
Smith, Wellesley, and Cornell have adopted a
system of several years study abroad and found it
productive of success. We can see little reason
for not following the same plan here.
Those who object to foreign study because of an
antipathy toward the policies of Herr Hitler or
Il Duce exhibit that short-sighted view of educa-
tion of which we accuse Fascist nations.
A liberal educational institution - and one that
professes to be progressive -should gladly acqui-
esce to this type of proposal. Men who come to
college with a purely social end in view would, of
course, eschew such a plan of study, but those
interested in a broader education would find such
an opportunity valuable.
A student of languages, philosophy, or Euro-
peon history would find two years abroad inval-
uable. Foreign study and foreign travel offer bene-
fits well known to all:
It would behoove Yale University authorities to
consider this liberalizing of the curriculum. The
technical difficulties are most certainly not in-
surmountable. Care must be taken to select the
right men and arrangements must be made with
European universities about courses, credits, and
tutorial work. But all these obstacles seem minor
when the undoubted advantages are weighed.
-The Yale News.
The University of London, England, has ap-
proximately 12,300 students and 1,243 instructors.
Dr. Melvin Jacobs, University of Washington an-
thropologist, is making phonograph records to pre-
serve the vanishing languages of the Pacific Coast

By BUD BERNARD
Here's a story, about a co-ed at Cornell Uni-
versity who is taking a course in social science.
The class had been discussing the various prob-
lems that arise in the family, when suddenly
the instructor sprung the question, "What is a
prerequisite for divorce?" That stumped the
class for a moment, but then this bright young
lady raised her hand and'waved it triumphant-
ly.
"Well, Miss , supposing you tell the class
the prerequisite for divorce," said the instruc-
tor.
She crashed through with the statement,
"The first prerequisite for divorce is that you
have to be married."
Here's a classification made by a senior at the
University of Wisconsin: Freshmen listen to every-
thing that is said; sophomores talk too much; jun-
iors observe too much, and seniors know too much.
Here's a squib sent in by F. C., a junior:
IS IT A SIN?
It's wrong to neck-
The critics say;
But still it's nice
To feel that way.
"A waste of time and money," is the epithet
hurled at Phi Beta Kappa and other honorary
fraternities on the Ohio University Campus by the
editors of the student publication, the Green and
White. Many editorials have been run in the paper
attacking the organizations, and leaders of the
honoraries have taken up the torch in their de-
fense. Both editors are members of the leading hon-
orary fjaternities.
"Dear Bud," writes M.S. "Have you heard
the story of the nudist who went to a mas-
querade party saying he was disguised as a road
map, as he had varicose veins?"
:k 1
To the girls looking for college romance: choose
your sweethearts from Phi Delta Theta. And to the
boys: Date at the Alpha Gamma Delta, Pi Beta
Phi, or Alpha Omicron Pi houses.
11 6 .
This statement was the result of a survey taken
on the University of Illinois campus recently. The
romance present in each house has in each in-
stance been determined by how many fraternity
pins have been given or received there.
The Phi Delta Thetas seem to be the cham-
pion pin losers, because 15 girls are wearing their
badge. Tied for second place are Delta Upsilon,
Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Psi and Sigma Chi.
As for the sorority with the largest collection of
fraternity pins Alpha Gamma Delta, Pi Beta
Phi and Alpha Omicron Phi seem to have the
lead.

CO LLEGIATE
OBSERVER

The'
Advantageous
Results of
Classified
SAdvertising
have been
proven
Cash Rates
ilC a Line
The Michigan Daily
Maynard Street
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DAILY
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Washington
Off The Record

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READ THE MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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The Class
Election Farce .. .

By SIGRID ARNE

W ilAT A PREPOSTEROUS farce this
business of class elections is!
Here are people who are arrived at a fairly high
distance in the educational ladder arguing, sweat-
ing, lying, weeping, swearing, promising, indulging
in hysterics - and all over something which they
and everyone else admits is a lot of nonsense not
worth a damn.
The party led by Mr. Whoossit is opposing the
party led by Mr. Whatis. The two parties are
fighting with unrestrained fervor to place their
men and women in class offices which have no
power, in which the occupants do no wok, and
where they will all be forgotten as soon as the elec-
tion is over. To accomplish this laudable purpose
it is necessary to promise jobs. And this is done
by promising houses and dormitories positions on
committees which do not exist.
The sophomore class of the Tau Tau Tau house
for example, does not knowhow it will vote. Con-
sternation reigns in the breasts of the politicos in
the two camps. One promises Tau Tau Tau three
positions on the publicity committee and two posi-
tions on the executive committee. Neither commit-
tee ever meets, but Tau Tau Tau appears satisfied.
Thereupon the other party raises the ante by
promising Tau Tau Tau four positions on the pub-
licity committee and three on the executive com-
mittee. The Tau Tau Tau bloc of votes is cast for
the candidates of the latter party, whoever they
may be.
What does Tau Tau Tau get? Nothing. Even if
Tau Tau Tau were granted a class office it would
still be getting nothing. But when it is granted
mythical positions on mythical committees, and
when it can become very much excited about main-
taining its "prestige" by gaining these committee
jobs, one cannot help think that what Tau Tau Tau
needs more than anything else is a brain analyst..
That is the class election. It is a grand battle
between opponents who employ empty shells and
fight for an hollow prize. It is a splendid farce,
made even more so by the pompous solemnity
of the participants.
More students are registered for the commerce

THE BEAUTIFUL new marine monument is now
in place on the Mt. Vernon Highway much to
the delight of Rep. Sol Bloom of New York who
pushed its completion.
Ten sea-gulls seem to float over the monument,
but .they are cleverly balanced and held together
where their wings touch.
Bloom heard some cynical tourist snort, "Hm!
Won't take long before they break off."
So Bloom did some investigating. Then he took
Secretary Swanson of the Navy to see it. As Swan-
son looked, eight husky workmen climbed the
monument and stood on the birds' wings.
"Sol, you read my mind," said Swanson. "I'd
never have believed it, if I hadn't seen it."
President Roosevelt was reminded at a re-
cent conference that the meeting was his 150th
one with the press since he took office.
"Gentlemen, I congratulate you on your en-
durance," he said.
"Same to you," was the immediate answer.
Sir Ronald Lindsay, the British ambassador,
has an "alphabet soup" all his own. Were he to
sign his name with all the titles and honors
which are his it would read like this:
"Sir.Ronald Lindsay, P.C., G.C.M.G., K.C.B.,
C.V.O., M.V.O., C.B., and LL.D."
THE CAPITAL was paid a delicate, if confusing,
compliment by a visitor from the Southwest.
He phoned police that he spent such an exciting
day seeing the sights he had forgotten where he
left his auto.
"Okay," said the desk sergeant, "What's the
license number?"
Silence.
"Say," said the visitor. "I've forgotten that, to6,
for the minute. I'll call you back."
Gen. Hugh S. Johnson, once of NRA, has
found the ideal office for the resting he wants
to do.
There is a large fireplace at one end of the
room surrounded by cartoons of the birth of
NRA. Over the general's desk is a picture of
the President, autographed, "To my good
friend, Hugh - Franklin D. Roosevelt."
THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS has a rare book
room which holds, probably, the world's finest
collection of rare editions.

SHNIORS
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THE MICH IGA N ENSIAN.

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