100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG AN D A ILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER, 25, 1934

--- -
,

Important Locations About New York In Lindbergh Kidnaping Case
-RANSOM
ZONE -
O w 1ERE MONEY -
WAS PAID AND
Z ¢ y t FOUNM :
r" AUPTMANN P T FUN
AIO "
Q?
* SPN HR
O N NEY PAID-
f/ EAST
ST R tltf C ESTER .:
C R GREENwtCW AVE
. AY oc sAi
-- W14ERE. SOLUTION
C - , OF CRIME OF THE
2 * SENTURZY WAS
GOLD CERTIFICATE °- ANNOUNC50
C SPENT HERE
- I
ERE MAR. 1,1932.
1~ODY FOUND WERE
CT
:.::..... M Y 1 937. 1
Locations in and around Metropolitan New York that have figured prominently in the Lindbergh baby kidnaping case and its possible solution
as a result of the arrest of Bruno Richard Hauptinann, fugitive German, are shown graphically in this Associated Press map. In the uppcr left is a
closeup of the ransom zone where the $50,000 ransom was paid and where part of the money was recovered at Hauptmann's hone. The diagram
of the filling station indicates where Hauptmann was finally detected as he passed one of the marked gold notes.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to ni members of the
University. Copy received at the oflice of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:30 a.w. 1Saturday.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1934
VOL. XLV No. 1
Notices
To Users of the Daily Official Bulle-
tin: The attention of users of The
Daily Official Bulletin is respectfully,
called to the following:
(1) Notice submitted for publica-
tion must be Typewritten and must
be signed.
(2) Ordinarily notices are pub-
lished but once. Repetition is at the
Edir/,'r's discretion.
(3) Notices must be handed to the
Assistant to the President, as Editor
of the Daily Official Bulletin, Room
1021 A. H., before 3:30 p. m. (11:30,
Saturdays).
Actions of the Administrative
Beard, College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts: The Administrative
Board of this College has voted the
indefinite suspeision of a student be-
cause of dishonesty in the final ex-
amination of Economics 171s.
The Board voted to approve a
grade of E and to deduct three hours
and three honor points from the total
record of a student because of his
plagiarism in English I.
Barbour Scholars: Dean Byrl F.
Bacher and Mrs. W. Carl Rufus will
give a tea in honor of the new Bar-
bour Scholars at the home of Mrs.
Heber D. Curtis, Observatory Resi-
dence, Tuesday from 4:00 to 5:30.
All present and former Barbour
Scholars are cordially invited.
Assembly of Chinese Students: All
Chinese students in the University
are requested to come to a brief in-
formal assembly at 7 o'clock, Wednes-
day evening, on the Second Floor
Terrace of the Michigan Union. This
will afford new and old students an
opportunity to get acquaintld with
each other and with some of the plans
for the year for our foreign student
groups. 14
J. Raleigh Nelson
Counsellor to Foreign Students
Notice: Palms, ferns and flowers
for campus use. Palms, ferns, other

decorative plants and cut flowers for
use of the campus are provi ed by the
Botanical Gardens to the extent that
the limited greenhouse space permits.
Other demands on the greenhouses
prevent the production of enough
ornamental plants to supply all the
demands. Many requests therefore
have to be refused. In order to save
the plants for the more appropriate
occasions, it is necessary to adhere
closely to tpe rule that they cannot
be supplied for purely social gather-
ings of the faculty or students, for
private offices on the campus, or for
student activities except under the
conditions defined below.
An attempt is always made to
provide as well as possible for official
events; for meetings at which some
group or organization of University
officials, faculty membe s, or stu-
dents represents the Unversity as
host to a University guest or visiting
organization, or is performing some
other direct service to the University,
such as raising funds for one of its
approved projects; for student events
of an educational nature; for public
entertainments for which no admiss-
ion is charged; and for the various
libraries and administrative offies.
Officers in charge of general
offices, libraries, etc., are invited to
(Continued on Page 3)

Michigan Observatory Is First
To Photograph Sun's Activity

The first successful attempt to
photograph activity on the sun was
accomplished this summer at Mich-
igan's McMath-Hulbert observatory
by Dr. Robert M. Petrie of the as-
tronomy department and Robert R.
McMath of the Motor Metals Man-
ufacturing Company.
These actual photographs of sun
spots, prominences, and "solar bombs"
are said to be the most interesting
contribution to astronomy in recent
years, and it is hoped that even more
information about heavenly bodies
will be gained in the next few years
when the activity of the sun is ex-
pected to increase.
The equipment by which these mo-
tion pictures were taken was per-
fected by the McMaths assisted by
Dr. Heber D. Curtis, director of the
Detroit Conservatory of the Univer-
sity, and by Dr. Burns of the Alle-
gheny Observatory in Pittsburgh. The
instrument by which these films were
made possible and which has taken
years to perfect is called the spectro-
heliokinematograph. It consists of a
special kind of light filter with cam-
era and a sensitive electric drive
which enables the astronomer to keep
Press Club Elects
Graduate President
Mark Foote, '03, Washington cor-
respondent of the Booth newspapers,
succeeds William C. Murphy, Jr., as
president of the National Press Club.
Mr. Foote, who was already vice-
president of the club, automatically
succeeds Mr. Murphy who resigned
the presidency to become publicity
director of the new Liberty league.
After graduating from the Univer-
sity Mr. Foote worked on the staff
of the magazine system in Chicago.
Two years later he worked with the
Grand Rapids Press, and in 1913 be-
gan his work as a Washington cor-
respondent.

the telescope exactly focused on a
body as it hurtles through space at a'
great speed.
Ordinary electricity to run the ma-
chine cannot be used because of its
sensitivity, but instead it is used to1
run a motor that operates a special
generator, which in turn produces the
right quality.
Dr. Petrie revealed that the pic-
tures were taken at a distance of 93,-
000,000 miles. "The most interesting
photograph of the summer," he ex-
plained, "was that of a phenomena
which occurred June 19, known as a
'solar bomb.'
The motion picture of this revealed
that the activity took place between
2:25 and 2:45 p.m. At 21:5 p.m. a faint
streak had appeared about 40,000 km.
to the southwest of the spot. It was
a dark area slowly growing in size.
At 2:34 p.m. a great mass of gas
about 31,000 miles long was explo-
sively ejected. In about three minutes
this mass expanded and swept out-
ward to a distance of about 63,000
miles. Its speed was about 43 miles per
second, and its total active life was
not more than ten minutes.
About 3 p.m. a second stage of ac-
tivity took place and a gas cloud mov-
ing at a rate of about 125 miles per
hour entered another dark strip caus-
ing a second explosion.
Other films of the sun's activities
were taken in July and August. On
August 11 the longest filming of a
prominence took place on the south
pole of the sun.
These motion pictures were exhib-
ited September 12 before the Amer-
ican Astronomical Society meeting at
New London, Conn., and are being
exhibited in various parts of the world
as well as in the United States. The
primary function of these films, Dr.
Petrie explained, was for purposes of
education along astronomical lines.

Joeckel Returns
From Study Of
Library Work .
The return of Prof. Carlton C.
Joeckel, of the library science depart- 1
ment, from a year's leave of absence
was announced today by Dr. William
W. Bishop, librarian of the Univer-
sity and head of the department of
library science.
Professor Joeckel has spent the last
year in study under a fellowship grant
of the Carnegie foundation. Using
the University of Chicago as a base,
he was engaged in research work
throughout the country on financial
support of public libraries, the results
of which will be published in a forth-
coming book.
While a portion of this investiga-
tion was accomplished in the city of
Chicago, Professor Joeckel traveled
extensively in the southern, eastern,
and central states, covering many of
the libraries in these states. An ex-
pert in library administration, his re-
search on this line is considered as
important, particularly in view of the
present financial situation.
Holder Of Alumni
Scholarship Dead
Grant Wellington, '37, holder of an
Alumni Association -Scholarship from
Detroit, took his own life at his home
recently. No apparent cause for the
action could be discovered.
Wellington, who was the president
of his high school graduating class,
maintained a high scholastic average
at the University. He was one of
twelve students who were selected out
of a field of 200 to win the Alumni
Scholarship last fall.

Your
SHOES~ P
have
TWO LIVES!
* wlen we REPAIR them-
with good materials.
* when they're new
Reasonable Prices!
While-U-Wait
QUALIITY
SHOE REPAIRING
343 S: Main (near William)

L

....
s

Here.itis
MONDAY,.
You, too, can sing the weekly
song of a dollar saved... may-
be more. How? Send your
laundry home. We'll pick it
up anytime, take it home, and
bring- it back on time..If you
are depression-conscious, you
may even send it "collect".
And if you remind the folks
that Railway Express is the
way to ship laundry, you
stand a chance of having yours

/,,and I still
got.
DOLLAR.
come back "prepaid." Think

it over.

, , :
«.

You can count on the de-
pendability of Railway Ex-
press for shipping anything--
anywhere. We give a receipt
on pick-up and take a receipt
on delivery, double proof of
prompt and careful handling.
Insurance included up to $50.
For service or information
merely call or telephone

" f

'L

When You Write
Think Of- tD l!

302 South State
Phone 8950

ruir I A 1 EI U%V r%^e

Main Office: 420 S. ASHLEY, Phone 7101
The best there is in transportation
SERVING THE NATION FOR 95 YEARS
RAILWAY
EXPRESS
AGENCY, Inc.

1 Phnr LAUlN.LJKTVon tb EST1:51
Every garment is personally inspected for smallf
tears and missing buttons. They are then re- o
paired and returned to you in perfect condition. 't1
MOE LAUNDRY
Phone 3916 204 N. Main St.

Royal Portable
TYPEWRITERS
$33.50 $45.00 $50.00 $60.00
USED TYPEWRITERS
Sales - Rentals - Service
Typing Paper 500 Sheets 40c

Fountain Pen &
Pencil Specials
$10.00 Set $4.25 $8.50 Set $3.95
-Standard Make-
SINGLE PENS $1.00 to $10.00

NATION-WIDE SERVICE

LI

lw

FIRST ART PRESENTATION OF THE YEAR
"NO GREATER GLORY"
A Columbia Picture - First Run in Ann Arbor
THIS Thursday ALL SEATS A Walt Disney Surrounding
WEEK- Friday RESERVED program
END Saturday 30c "Silly Symphony" & "Mickey Mouse"
PHONE BOX OFFICE 6300
--at the
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre

A,

I

MAJESTIC

WHITNEY
Daily 1:30 to 11 P.M.
15c to 6 25c After 6
--- LAST DAY
Hans Fallada's
"Little Man
WV"Vhat Now"
with
MARGARET
SULLAVAN

i

Right Now

I

MICHIGAN

TODAY and WEDNESDAY

Sing it--'
'Quote it-
Love iu
Warner Bros
_y

1i

~~ix~-ww~:\ -' I -- WEDNESDAY

11

_ WEDNESDAY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan