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October 27, 1934 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-27

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PAGE EIGHT

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY''

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1934

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27. 1934

Union Is Scene
Of Annual Land
Owners Meetinfg
J. S. Weidman Discusses
Competition Code For
Lumber Industries
Agree Upon Code

Roo sevelt A'sks B aker's"'14"ait h In Peo ple

University And Industry' I
Relations Are Discussed
By Dr. Ja7nes Bruce
The fifth Annual Land Utilization
Conference of Timberland Owners
opened at the Union yesterday with!
Prof. Donald M. Matthews of the
School of Forestry and Conservation atnascir nfothmrig
session. Over 75 prominent repre-
sentatives of land ownership together
with professors of forestry and con-
servation were present.
At the morning session, J. S. Weid- --asociated Press Photo
man, of the .Weidman Lumber Co., Pry ident Rooevelt is shown as he prepared to address the American
Trout Creek, discussed the govern- Barkers Association convention in Washington. At left is Francis Marion
the lumber and timber industries. Law, retiring 'iresident of the association, and at right the President's
Mr. Weidman said that in addition son, Ellictt. "In March, 1933, I asked the people of this country to renew
to production quotas and allotments their confidence in banks," Mr. Roosevelt said. "They took me at my
causing a great deal of trouble to word. Tonight I ask the bankers of this country to renew their conft-
northern manufacturers, price dif- 1 dence in the people of this country."
ferentials granted to small portable
mills had stimulated production to '
the disadvantage of large mills with Dr. Charles Sheldon TO Speak
heavy investment and overhead.
John M. Bush, of the Cleveland Nov. 15 Under SCA Auspices
Cliffs Iron Co., Negaunee, reported to'U d r xp e s
the conference that a set of rules
covering improvement of logging Dr. Charles M. Sheldon, well-known I demonstrate the teaching of his book.
practice had been agreed upon and author and minister, will lecture Nov. While the Capital previously had a
would go into effect on Nov. 1 for ful- H circulation of but 12,000, in this as-
fillment of Article 10 of the code. 15 in Hill Auditorium, underthe aus-tonishingly short period the number
Dean S. T. Dana of the School pices of the Student Christian Asso- of copies sold jumped to 367,000 and
of Forestry and Conservation intro- ciation. His topic will be "The Out- because the press was too small, mat-
duced Dr. James D. Bruce, vice-presi- look For a Warless World." rixes were sent to Chicago, New York,
dent in charge of University rela- Dr. Sheldon, a graduate of Brown Boston, and London, England.
tions, who welcomed the group at University and Andover Theological For a number of years Dr. Sheldon
luncheon in the absence of President Seminary, came into world fame in was Editor-in-Chief of the Christian
Alexander G. Ruthven, one of the 1896 with the publication of his re- Herald and is still a contributing edi-
sponsors of the conference. Dr. Bruce ligious novel, "In His Steps," 23,000,- tor. He has had an active part in
said that he was extremely gratified 000 copies of which were sold, accord- many national and world campaigns.
at the growing number of contacts ing to the Publisher's Weekly, N. Y. In the past few years Dr. Sheldon
between the University and industry This is the second largest circulation has given his time completely over
and predicted that many would be of any book in the world, the Bible to a campaign for World Peace and
cemented to permanent relationships. having precedence. The book was has addressed audiences in all parts
The result of such relationships, Dr. first read to his Sunday evening au- of this country, speaking abroad
Bruce said, was that the best of aca- dience at the Central Congregational many timhes. Last August in Flint
demic and industrial viewpoints Church in Topeka, Kansas, later he spoke to more than 4,000 people
would be applied in solving social being translated into 21 foreign in spite of the fact that it was at a
problems. languages, time when a greater part of the resi-
George P. McCallum of the Detroit ; In 1900 Dr. Sheldon edited the To- dents were away at their summer
Mackinac Land Co. replied paying peka Daily Capital for one week to homes or on vacations.
his respects to the "brain trust" idea,
which thishconference has worked!
out with the faculty of the School m- 1 =
of Forestry and Conservation.
Prof. W. F. Ramsdell, chairman! r
of the afternoon session, introduced . .s
E. W. Tinker, Regional Forester of At WINES IELD (corner Hill and Division
the United States Forestry Service, BA'TTLE CREEK HIGH SCHOOL vs.
Milwaukee. Mr. Tinker proposed
three possibilities for keeping the ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOLj
remnant of merchantable timberland
in Michigan located principally in Saturday, October 27th at 10:30 A.M.
the upper peninsula of the state. With GENERAL ADULT 50c
his report, Mr. Tinker presented sev- Grade School Children 10c & SeniorH 35c
eral illustrations where practical ap- LAT HMEJunior EHigh
plications of the plans might be made.

University 9s Will HO( Contests No Major Casualties
Symphony To At Airport Sunday Reported Yet From
The spot landing and bombdrop- '37-'38
Play Sunday ping contest for university studentsr
hich was postponed last week on
'account of weather conditions will Class warfare, soph-frosh not
Michigan's University Symphony,
be held this Sunday at the Ann Ar- Marxian, has resulted in no major
orchestra will make its season's de- bor airport, according to George casualties or wounds thus far, Dr.
but at the Faculty Concert at 4:15. Downs, instructor. William Brace, Health Service phy-
Sunday, Oct. 28, in Hill Auditorium. The first contest to take place will sician, announced yesterday.
Mrs. Mabel Ross Rhead, pianist, will be that of bomb-dropping to be fol- One freshman was treated for a
be the soloist for the concert. The lowed by the spot landing contest. scalp wound requiring a few stitches
orchestra will be under the direction In the former contest Mr. Downs will the doctor reported, but nothing else
of Prof. Earl V. Moore. fly the plane out of which the com- has come to the Health Service's at-
The orchestra is composed of the petitors will drop the bombs. In the tention. In. spite of nocturnal im-
following students: Pope Benjamin, latter the spot landing must be made mersions in the icy waters of the
'35SM, Alvin Benner, '35M Ken- from a 180 degree angle approach Huron, and half-clothed parades by
neth Bovee, '35SMm Elmer Bruck, without the aid of the motor, which, members of the class of '37, no colds
'35SM, David Burchuk, '35SM,Bessie however, will be kept running, or pneumonia cases have appeared.
Burgoyne, '36SM, Frederick Baessler, A bout 12 students, including a "In fact," Dr. Brace stated, "ama-
'35A, G. H. Cannon, '38E, Lewis Cas-'! number of women, will compete in teur football has proven itself far
ner, '37M, Jane Cohn, '36SM. Ken- the program, showing a decided in- more bloody than the highly adver-
neth Cole, '37wMd Lane Emeryy''38M, crease in interest on the part of stu- tised class battles."
Anne Farquhar, '36 M , George Finch, dents. Expecting a casualty list of some
H,'385M, Raymond FinkH . '37SM,.Henry----------sortat the class games today, Drs.
eFox.,Frdn, '35L, n 7uM, I Matthews, 36 M, Clair Magoon, '36L, Maurice McGarvey and John V. Fop-
Charles Gilbert '36M, Elizabeth C. Meagher. Grad., G. Miller, '38SM, eano, freshman and sophomore class
Gipe, '3L I Nellie Minifie, '36SM, Mary Morrison, doctors. will be on hand at the field
Leona Haefner, '35M, Doris Ham-1'38M, Mary E. Morrison, '35SM, John of battle to render first aid.
ill, '36L, Romine Hamilton, Mus. Spec., dMasajgo, '36SM, Anne Neracher,
Howard Hathaway, '36M, George '37SM, Rudolph Nichols, Grad., HAHN RETURNS
Hamm '36L, Myra Hilpert, '36L, Alice George O'Day, '36SM, Abe Osser, Dr. W. H. Hahn of the zoology de-
Hoffman, '365SM, John Houdek, Mus. '35SM. partment will return tonight from a
Spec., Fred Hunt, '35L, Mona Hutch- Howard Park, '35SM, Frances Park- meeting of the American Ornitholo-
ings, '35SM, Robert Junerjager, '38- er, '37SM, Ruby Peinert, '35SM, Vlas- read aiona papegohe.meetno
SM, EileenaIcheldinger, '37SM, Wini- ta Podoba, '36 M, Owen Reed, '37M,teahatsboftoenbirdeding
fred Jackson, '36SM, Arthur Jefferson, Margretta Reid, '37L, Willis Rich- 'nehtin es on heon hichsuetnh
'37SM, Thor Johnson, Music Grad, ards, '36SM, Stanley Rontal, '38SM,netgsaonnwhcsujth'
William Jones, '38SM, Aaroe Kauppi, Kenneth Sage, '35SM, James Salis- has done considerable research.
'37SM, Nathalie Keller, Everett Kis- bury, '35SM; Eldon Scott, '35SM, ____________________
finger, '35SM, John Krell, '37SM, 'Francis Seely, '38SM, Harry Siegel,
Theodore Lee. '38SM, Charlotte Lewis, '35SM, E. Silfries, '36SM, W. Sleator,
'38L. Frank Suda, '35SM, Fred Sundstrom,
N. Lichtenwanger, '37SM, Douglas; '37SM, Clyde Vroman, '38SM, Janet
Liston, '37SM, Charles McNeill, '37SM, Willoughby, '37SM, a n d Harold
Maretta Martinek, '35SM, Ralph' Welch, Grad.

i1

Seyfried Jewelers
Dealers in Watches,
Clocks and Jewelry
HIGH GRADE REPAIRING
304 South Main St.

SI

------- -

'"N T A T

40

h

01p

'EL

Alger's Papers Are
Given To Library
The personal papers, correspond-
ence, and other documents belong-
ing to the late Gen. Russell A. Alger,
have been turned over to the Univer-
sity library.
Dr. William W. Bishop, head of
the department of library science,
and librarian of the University, ac-
cepted the gift on Tuesday, when the
General's daughters drove to Ann
Arbor, and presented the paper.
These are termed as being ofgreat
historical importance, being concern-
ed with many important events in
the history of the United States since
a period before the Civil War.
These papers have been given by
the children of General Alger, Mrs.
.Henry D. Sheldon, Mrs. Harold R.
Boyer, Mrs. Stephen T. Stackpole,
and Mrs. Charles B. Pike, Mrs. Fred-"
erick M. Alger, widow of General Al-
ger, accompanied them on their trip
to Ann Arbor.
General Alger was Secretary of
War under President McKinley,
United States Senator from Mich-
igan. and spent a large portion of his
life in Washington.

IT-

JLLE-

I

In the heart of Detroit
SINGLE ROOMS
NO
HIGHER
ALL WITH BATH
MICHIGAN & ILLINOIS FROLIC IN
THE ARABIAN ROOM TONIGHT!
DINNER-DANCING ... . 6 to 9 P.M.
SUPPER-DANCING .. . . . 9 till Closing
KARL SPAETH & HIS "SANGAMO
ORCHESTRA AND ENTERTAINERS
RESERVATIONS: CHERRY 5200

Let's find out why
Turkish tobacco is so important
to a good cigarette

V

Fresh

To

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to the Game...!o

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40

You

On the sunny slopes of
Smyrna . . , in the fertile
fields of Macedonia... along
the shores of the Black Sea
...grows a kind of tobacco
that is different from any
other tobacco in the world.
T H ESE Turkish tobaccos
are the only tobaccos of
foreign cultivation that are
used to any great extent in
making American cigarettes.
Turkish tobaccos are famous
for their spicy aroma, and a
blend of the right kinds of
Turkish tobacco with our own
home-grown tobaccos is better
than any one kind used alone.
In Chesterfield we balance
mild, ripe tobaccos grown
in this country with just the
right amounts of the right
kinds of Turkish.
It is by blending and cross-

FEATURED AT OUR FOUNTAIN
HOT FUDGE SUNDAE
WITH WHIP CREAM
15c

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