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October 25, 1934 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1934

THE M ICHIGAN DAILY

. ............ . ....... ... . . . . . ......

Prof M. Elliott
Announced As
Guest Speaker

coins Unearthed In ExpeditionI
Necessitate Careful Cleaning

,League Council
Entertained By

tees included Kathleen Carpenter,
chairman of Judiciary Council, Sue
Mahler, chairman of the House Com-
mittee, Ann Osborne, Social chair-
man, Margaret Phalan, publicity, Sue
Calcutt, Theatre and Arts, Marie
Mtz rr Ri--ptin G 'rniia C al-

iI
Banquet Tickets To Be
Purchased By Friday
All Panhellenic representatives
should contact Marjorie Turner
at the Undergraduate Office be-
!twee n 4:00 and 5:00 today or to-

Gueists Of Hono
Prograa, Plan
Banquet Are A

Prof. Margaret Ellio
nomics and Business
partments, will deliver
Panhellenic Banquet
night in the League.
liott will discuss the
current events to coll
particularly stressing ti
women keeping up on
world affairs.
The guests of honor'
invited to attend the Bf
President and Mrs.
Ruthven, Regent Esth
Dean and Mrs. Joseph
and Mrs. Edward Kra
Mrs. Wilber R. Hum
Alice C. Lloyd, Dean-E
Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. I
Byrl Fox Bacher, Mi;
Cormick, Dr. Margar
Jeanette Perry, Mrs.7
Miss Laurie Campbell,
Mrs. Rudolph Winnack~
Mr. Smith will spea
sembly on scholarshi
Lloyd is to present tl
award to Chi Omega, v
highest scholastic ratin
year. Other features o
include formal dialogu
Blum, '35, who will tall
speaker as the various
ter the ballroom. Th
Maxine Maynard, Jeai
Mary Morrison, will als
selections.
Students who will be
speakers' table include
'36, chairman of the b
Aigler, '35, president of
Ruth Root, '35, Jane
Virginia Cluff, '36, othe
officers; members of
Council; and Eleanor
Betty Hill, '36, and M
'35, officers of the Asse
Marjorie Turner, '37,
tickets, will be in the U
office of the League fr(
5 for the rest of thet
orders and receive chec
Her telephone is 2-356
are also to bring a pa
ten inches long, in the s
and glass candlesticks,
the office of Miss Ethe
before noon Monday.

_ By MARION IIOLDEN and the oxidation is completely re- ".-A1L)I \ AI Yei
One of the most important details moved. _
)r Invited; which h ars imortin wth The University has found about A banquet was held last night in
which has arisen in connection with E
is For Ile coins dug up by the University's ex- 30000hcoinseand about 10,000 o honor of League Council members
these have already been cleaned. The
knnouncedi pedition in Palestine is the cleaning department is about ready to publish by the officers and chairmen of the
and preserving of the treasures in an account of 2,600 of these finds. Union, under Allen McCombs, presi-
tt, of the Eco- such a manuxer as to maintain their Due to the various methods of clean- dent. The reciprocal banquets by
Education de- value. ing that were employed, they have which officials of the men's govern-
the address at ,e pbeen able to read successfully about ing body and officials of the women's
next Monday the digging, which took place at Sel- 35 per cent of the coins that were entertain each other have become an-
ProfssorEl-found, and about 30 per cent were
Professor E- eucia an the Tigris, a city founded drnual affairs.
pertinence of by the successors of Alexander the found to be badly worn.
ege life, more Great, coins which dated as far back Most of the things that were found Council membeis attending incud-
he necessity of as the Fourth Century B.C. were giv- were dug out of the mud floors of the ed Maxine Maynard, League presi-
contemporary en scientific-treatment. Seleucia was, ancient houses and were quite scat- dent, Billie Griffiths, Mary Ferris and
at the time of the stamping of the tered except for seven or eight hoards Charlotte Whitman, vice-presidents,
who have been coins which were found, the largest of coins that were probably buried and Barbara Sutherland, secretary.
anquet include city in the world and the most impor- when the inhabitants feared an in- Betty Aigler, president of Panhellen-
Alexander G. tant center of civilization during the vasion. e. ic, and Eleanor Peterson, president
ier M. Cram, periods of the Seleucian, Parthian, The University stopped work in of the Assembly, were also present.
Bursley, Dean and Sassanian Empires. 1932 and are at present compiling The chairmen of general commit-
us, Dean and H as well as at Cepphoris P an account of the finds. They hope,--- -__
phreys, Dean Here,ahowever, to begin excavating again
meritus Myra estine, coins dating from the Third in the near future. Tea Held To Welcome
a~mrits MraCentury B.C. to the Third Century lea______o__lcome_
ra Smith, Mrs. A.D. were uncovered. They were of New Sorority Chaperon
ss Ethel Mc- gold, silver, copper, and bronze and,
et Bell, Miss as they had become oxidized, chemical Ad inistrL 1011 Alpha Chi Omega sorority held a
L. B. Conger, cleaning was necessary before they tea for its new chaperon, Clara Wil-
and Mr. and cudb ed
er. could be read.er Ive son, Tuesday afternoon. Among those
The gold coins that were found who attended were Dean Alice Lloyd
k to the as- came out of the ground as bright1 * 1
p, and Miss and shiny as though they were new. y a r m ito r y and members of the Dean of Wom-
he traditional The silver, bronze, and copper coins, . en'. Staff, the chaperons and presi-
which had the however, had to be carefully treated. dents of other houses, and alumnae
.g for the past The silver and copper finds were aHelen Newberry Residence enter- of Alpha Chi Omega. Fall flowers
f the program passed through a solution of 5 to 15 'tined at a formal administration and candles decorated the tea table
e by Eleanor per cent formic acid. They were dinner preceding the first Choral Un- and other parts of the house.
k over a loud- then brushed until the inscriptions ,ion Concert last night. Yellow, white, In the receiving line were Miss Wil-
sororities en- could be read. and lavender chrysanthemums made son, Barbara Jean Owens, Mrs. Ben-
1e vocal trio, The bronze objects were treatedninie Oosterbaan, and Mrs. Pat Krause
n Seeley and two different ways. Some werepassed up the center-pieces at - the small of Detroit. Those pouring were: Mrs.
o sing several through a solution of 5 per cent cans- tables; and in addition to these there Harvey Nichols, Mrs. John Mathus,
tic soda and 15 per cent rochelle salts. were bowls of yellow calendulas at Mrs. John Fopeano, and Constance
seated at the The coins are soaked in this cold solu-. the two long tables. The place cards Beery of Detroit.
Jane Arnold, tion four or five times and are brush- were small photographs of the house, Music was supplied by Dorothy
anquet, Betty ed after each soaking. This has to taken, developed, and tinted by Betty Hood, '34, and Dorothy Schutt, '37.
Panhellenic; be very carefully done, because there Hill, '35. Ivory tapers were used. In Jane Fauver, '34, was in charge of the
Brucker, '35, is great danger of the bronze en- the parlors where coffee and mints j tea. Miss Wilson, whose home is in
,r Panhellenic graving disappearing. The second were served after the dinner, large Grand Rapids, is a graduate of Mich-
the League method is a much safer one, and the baskets of rust mums were arranged. igan State College and a member of
Peterson, '35, objects are cleaned by electrolysis. A Miss Ruth Pfohl, house director; Alpha Chi Omega and of Mu Phi
[artha White, light current is run through the coins, Miss Vera Howard, business manager honorary musical sorority and of Phi
mbly. and dietitian; and Isabelle Currie, Kappa Phi. She is also a member of
chairman of '35, house president, received the the Stanley chorus.
rndergraduate Sperks'At guests including Dean and Mrs.
om 4 p.m. till Graduate Luncheon Joseph Bursley, Dean and Mrs. Ed-
week, to take ward Kraus, Prof. and Mrs. Georgei W h
ks for tickets. Stanley, Mr. and Mrs. Ira M. Smith,
8. Sororities German people tolerate the Na- Dean Alice Lloyd, Miss Jeannette Per-
ir of candles tional Socialist regime only because ry, Dr. Margaret Bell, Miss Ann Var-
orority colors, they feel that the only alternativej dan, Mrs. Byrl Bacher, Miss Kathleen Motion Pictures: Whitney, "Most
to be left in government would be communism, ac- Hamm, and Miss Sarah Rowe. Precious Thing in Life"; Wuerth,
el McCormick cording to Lawrence Preuss, of the Betty Kelley, '37, Dorothy Briscoe, "Modern Hero" and "She Made Her
political science department, who '37, Elsa Van Slyke, '36, Jean Hay- Bed"; Majestic, "The Barretts of
spoke at a luncheon held yesterday ward, '35, Margaret Cutler, '36, Betty Wimpole Street" with Norma Shear-
in the League tea room for grad- Woodwotth, '37, '37 er; Michigan, "Big Hearted Herbert"j
uate students. Marjorie Western, '35, Harriet Woj- with Guy Kibbee.
t League Mr. Preuss, who spent last year towicz, '36, and Betty Hill,,'35, acted Lectures: Ruth Bryan Owen on
traveling throughout Germany, said as hostesses, and Dorothy McLaren, "This Business of Diplomacy," at
the Orien- that ahothef reason "for this passive '36, was in charge of the arrange- 8:30 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
meet for a toleration of the Hitler government ments. Dancing: Den Cellar, Hut Cellar.
at 12 noon is the fact that the people feel that ---- - - _ ______
rea Room of it is their only bulwark against the
aggression of France and against the
Jews. He said that even if another
government were in power, it would
have to maintain the same foreign ,

1euge , necepuion, ueorgzna uar- 'v1 ~ucLI Vt~VV t
son, Merit System head, Mary Sabin, morrow to pay for tickets for the
chairman Undergraduate Fund, Hilda banquet. Money must be in by
Kirby, Orientation, and Ruth Root, Friday.
Athletic chairman.
- - --- -
BEJAUTIFUL CL TES
are of
! Great Consequence
They engage and, attract before merit can
engage the understanding. They captivate
the heart - and give rise to Extravagant
Notions of Charm.

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'$14eTpalp"' 5 o 0 0

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Orientation Ada
To Meet At
Student advisers on
tation project willr
round-table discussion
today in the Russian I
the League.

WE SPECIALIZE
in
HANDKERCH I EFS
Initial Handkerchiefs for men
and women. Dainty after-
noon and evening handker-
chiefs. Also smart handker-
chiefs to match the street. suit.
Reasonably priced, at
The GAGE
LINEN SHOP
Nickels Arcade

policy of the Hitler regime, in order
to keep favor with the people.
I ^. tI ,

Il

III

C IZIALS
By KAYSER
A rayon tricot knit fabric,
beautiful quality and inex-
pensive.
Panlies. - - - $1.00
Petticoats -. -. $1.50

Slips

---- $1.95

I

Slips and Petticoats have
shadow panels.

EAST LIBERTY AT MAYNARD
° Jacobson's
HomeCOmning
Bands are playing - flags are
- flying - everybody's all set for
a grand celebration . . . and
we're set to score a "touch-
down" with these
moderately
priced at
I r( .ltand,
Suede-
Tree Bark-
-Iough Grains--
aC'ornbnations- 1
Kidskins-
® You'll just have to have
a pair of these 'Connies to
do justice to such an event.
Perfect styles for the game,
for meeting the "grads" . ..
and for "heavy dates." It's
a riailar fogtival of nr-

- _ _ _ _ -.. I

CLASSIFIED ADS

II

VAN
8

THE
BUREN SHOP
Nickels Arcade

.s

ill

Tramp us Around
the Campus
* We are just the Shoes for wear with your
new Wool Dresses, Sweater Ensembles and
Tweed Suits.
* For dress up and week-ends, youthful,
new patterns to please you and your feet.
BLACK OR BROWN MANDRUCA

You speak into the telephone. Your voice, your
personality, part of you is projected far and wide.
In effect you are in two places and times at once-
evening in New York, afternoon in San Francisco.
Or you're in Washington today and in Sydney,
Australia tomorrow-at one and the same time!
The telephone's power to put a person where he
wants to be-at the psychological moment-proves
tremendously valuable.
In domestic and foreignL
business, in national and
international affairs, in W y
friendly social contacts,y.

III

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