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October 21, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IIGAN DAILY

1c

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be lrief, the editor reserving the.right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.

**"V*..

F I

Critique

- -7-,
CPiblisled every morning except Monday drIng the
University yearrand Summer Session by the Boad in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
nd -the Big Ten News Service.
, M EMSBER ,
ssocatted olegiate $ress
"U x~
- 1934 (iitlIet13s e
IEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
'r republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
ot ,otherwise credited in this paper and the localnews
rnbliehed herein. All rights of republication of special
ispatches are reserved.-
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
econd class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Ehr4 Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer bycarrier, $1.00; by mail,
1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
nail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
nn Arbor, Michigan. Phone~ 2-1214.
Representatives: NationalAdvertising Service, Inc. 11
fest 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
3hicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
WANAGING EDITOR ...........WILLIAM G. FERRIS
NITY, EDITOR. ............r.... ,.... JOHN HEALEY
ITORIAL DIRECTOR..........RALPH G. COULTER
iPORTS EDITOR..... .....ARTHUR CARSTENS
f MEN's EDITOR................ELEANOR BLUM
IGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
S. Oroehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, RobertS. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
PORTS ASSISTANTS; Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
VOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
EPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Mevin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reih, Mar-
shall Shulman Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Sidel~Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
Robert Cummins, Fred Delano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Bett HGoldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion h lolden, Lois 'Ding, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy
happel, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, .Jewel Wuerfel.I
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
UINESS MANAGER ...... . .......RUSSELL B. READ
)REDIT MANAGER ................ROBERT S. WARD
OMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .........JANE BASSETT
EPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Servie Department, Bernrajd Rosenthal; Contract.
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and NatIonal Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
USINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt,. Ted Wohlgemuithl, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hardenook, ohn Park, F.Allen Upson Willis Tom-
lnnHomer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland. Betty Simonds Grace Snyder, Margaretta
.ohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula-Joerger, Mary Lou Hfooler, Jane Heath Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper.
NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL J. ELLIOTT
'he Long-'
-oub t Victory...
T HE MICHIGAN football team has
at last climbed to victory. After two
orrowful Saturday afternoons, durig which time
/ichigan got to its oppoients' 30-yard line only
ince, the Wolverine has won.It is true that Georgia
.ech did not compare with Michigan State or Chi-
ago in ability. It is true, too, that Geoigia Tech is
ar away from the Big Ten area, that it is a school
vith which we have no natural rivalry, and that
ve probably will not play them again for a long-
ong time. But none of these facts can detrat from
he sweetness of the first Michigan victory of the
ear. The future, though far from bright, is at least
iot the pitch black it was at this time a week ago.
%ichigan can still win football games.

To the Editor:
WE HAD HOPED that The Daily this year would
climb out of the rut of illusioned and hack-
neyed mediocrity, and stand, like Arrowsmith,
firmly on the ground. We had hoped that it would
abandon a smug complacency masquerading under
the title of journalism and counting for its support
on groups as smugly complacent as their prejudices.
We had hopedthat it would adopt a policy of ade-
quate and unbiased presentation of all news, and
an editorial policy thinking through the premises
of the unthinking and an attitude of courage, not
of evasion.
We cannot think that the omission of pertinent
news is due to inadequate facilities, for we are
delighted daily by editorial excursions into realms
far removed from the campus, where the questions,
if not moot, necessarily involve a broader outlook
than can be commanded. We must conclude that
much is not heard because it will not be heard.
We cannot think that the reporter's slate takes
color from facts to be written, and must conclude
that the colored sneers of red and black are painted
by a biased mind. We cannot think that the mirror
of the editorial mind could fail to focus upon con-
troversies which are echoed by the very trees, and
charge evasion.
We do not charge that The Daily has murdered
our citizens and destroyed our towns. We do charge
that in the Ward affair may be seen the efforts of
The Daily to avoid discontent by a masterly side-
stepping of the real issue editorially and by a
suppression of the real facts or deliberate failure
to obtain credible information in the face of ru-
mors that were rife.
We ask why no attempt was made to discover
whether the Board in Control of Athletics sched-
uled the Georgia Tech game oblivious of Ward.
We ask why no thought was given to the reason-
able inference that the game was accepted on the
express condition that Ward would not play. We
ask why no effort was made to ascertain at what
time Ward had been informed of this matter. We
do not regard as a satisfactory answer derogatry
remarks assailing dissenters merely because they
were dissatisfied with what appeared to be an in-
evitable probability. Nor as satisfactory the doing
of nothing to substantiate or refute the stories.
We do not consider ourselves answered with
cries of "reds" and "racial discrimination" together
with quips on the doubtful analogy existing be-
tween short skirts and petitions, and allusions to
hospitality. The Daily could have attempted a
publication as news of what actually transired
even if it did not have he courage to condemn
the treatment of Ward as a Negro rather than a
Michigan man in its editorials. Race discrimination
was a minor point as compared with the action of
the Board in Control of Athletics in this matter.
We charge that The Daily does not test ideas for
merit. The source of the idea seems determinative
of its reception, and the taboo of social discrimina-
tion as rigid as that of the caste system of India.
Simply because a proposition springs from a group
professedly radical is no reason to stigmatize it
with the name "red," and avoid pressing it as
deserving of the attention of intelligent people.
Students are intelligent enough to figure out
whether an idea is worthwhile regardless of who
propounds it; and The Daily should be as intelli-
gent in fighting for a principle regardless of'its
source. As Mr. Justice Holmes said: "But when men
have realized that time has upset many fighting
faiths, they come to believe even more than they
believe the very foundation of their own conduct
that the ultimate good desired is better reached
by free trade of ideas - that the best test of truth
is the power of the thought to get itself accepted
in the competition of the market, and that truth
is the only ground' upon which their wishes safely
can be carried out."
We hope for better things. We must content
ourselves that the editor of The Daily cannot be
both a Socrates and a Caliph of Bagdad, though
he has cultivated an admirable country squire su-
perciliousness. We want news on the news page
and editorials on the editorial page. We do not
want editorials in the news columns and doddering
aphorisms and affectation in the editorial columns.
Cyril F. Hetsko, '36L.
Morris Weller, '35L.
Robert E. Acherburg, Jr., '35L.
Wm. Babcock, Jr., '35L.
A. D. Kennedy, Jr., '36L.

CO LLEGIATE
OBSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
Commented a Hollywood casting director: "We
can't use him. He doesn't look like a football
player." The remark came as a result of an appli-
cation for a role in a football picture by Irvine
Warburton, University of Southern California All-
American grid star. According to reports he is the
same director who picked Ramon Novarro for the
role of a gridiron giant in a recent football flicker.
A.S.B. sends in the following contrib en-
titled :
FOR I'M A COLLEGE MAN
I'm much intrigued by dancing;
I like my liquor straight;
I always start romancing
On the very first date.
I never read a textbook;
The teachers dear I bluff;
I like to haunt some nook
While doing caveman stuff.
Although I spend much money
It seems I'm always flat;
But I'd rather have my honey
Than A's and B's at that.
The college life has taught me
Just what it means to live,
And you can bet that I'll be here
As long as Dad will - give!
They are talking about the dumb pledge at
the Kappa house at the University of Illinois
who thinks the solar plexus is a new planet.
Students at the University of Maryland have
circulated a petition among the students of that
institution which asks that the co-eds refuse to
make dates for more than one week in advance. It
seems as though all the popular co-eds on that
campus are so busy that it is impossible to arrange
dates with them unless one makes the engagement
three or four weeks in advance. Many boys refuse
to do this saying that "they wouldn't do that for
Mae West herself."
A beautiful Theta at the University of Illi-
nois, while translating to French the sentence:
"Good morning, teacher, how do you do?" used
the familiar form of the word "you."
The handsome young instructor, wishing to
correct her, asked: "Why did you use the
familiar form "thou" instead of "you"?
"Well," she hesitated, "I thought that after
last night ...

I *U
I U
"U

I
jUl
El
-
II

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents
EIGHT GREAT
ATT ~.TN

The Honorable
OWEN
Amb assador to Denmark
speaking on
"THIS BUSINESS
OF DIPLOMACY"
Hill Auditorium 8-00 P.M.
Thursday, Oct. 25

Second Number

STUART
Noted Popular Economist
speaking on
"THE ECONOMY
Of A BUNDANCE"
Hill Auditorium 8 P.M.
Thursday, Nov. 8
35c PER NUMBER

AVERAGE COST... . .

Season Tickets $3.00, $2.75, $2.50 Single Admissions 75c & 50c
TICKETS AT WAHR'S NOW

Washington
Ofd The Record

R EAD THE DAILY CLASSIFID A DS
--1

ii

By SIGRID ARNE
TWITTING FRANK GORMAN about the striking
textile workers he led, doesn't bother him. He
tells in defense a story about mine strikes.
A Negro striker was arrested following the dyna-
miting of a mine.
"Do you know anything about that dynamite?"
asked the judge severely.
"No, suh!" said the Negro. "Ah wasn't on that
committee."
* * * *
Fall arrives in the capital. The hundred-
and-one little florist carts about the streets
glow with great bunches of bittersweet brought
in from the nearby Virginia hills.
DISTRICT ATTORNEY SAMUEL J. FOLEY of
New York who is conducting the investigation
of the Lindbergh case knew the colonel long before
either had planned their careers.
Foley was a young page in the House of Repre-
sentatives when Lindbergh's father was a member.
Young Lindbergh, then about 8 years old, used
to enter the House occasionally to "hit" his father
for some pennies. Foley was the page who escorted
him on and off the floor.
An attache of -the Japanese embassy had
a few bad moments with a very determined
Washington matron. She insisted on seeing the
ambassador.
And the attache's first duty was to protect
the ambassador from callers with unannounced
missions. Finally the lady confessed:
"Well, I've simply got to know where he
gets his grass seed."

F0VNTAI N PE N S
ARE YOU HAPPY WITH YOU R FOU NTAIN PEN?
Have you a SHEAFFER, PARKEk or WATERMAN ?
We shall be glad to show you.
Sheaffers at $2.75, $3.25, $5.00, $7.50, $9.50, $10.00
Parker's ............. at $3.00, $5.00, $9.50, $10.00
Waterman ............ at $2.95, $5.00, $7.00, $10.00
Wai's. ...... ... at $2.25, $3.00, $5.00, $6.00, $7.50
Desk Sets-......at $5.00, $7.50, $10.00, $15.00, $25.00
Every pen guaranteed and your name engraved
on barrel without expense -Pens repaired.

1s Ward

ttninar* .
T T WAS THE PECULIAR character-
istic of the Ward-Georgia Tech
matter that everyone who touched it did so only
to lose in respect and esteem. The athletic de-*
partment, responsible first for scheduling the con-
test and then for a willingness to risk serious cam-
pus disorder rather than cancel it, was guilty
of placing the University and the student body
in a very difficult position. The National Student
League, which used the affair as a means of caus-
ing as much embarrassment and gaining as much.
publicity as possible, achieved neither its professed
purpose of putting Ward in the game nor the
greater purpose of lessening discrimination against
Negroes - both in the North and the South. The
Tory group of the Ward protest meeting Friday
night, led by almost all the prominent extra-curric-
ular men on campus, did not convince one single4
person, despite the soundness of its arguments, be-
cause the group insisted upon an appalling exhibi-
tion of bad manners, bad taste, and bad sense.
It will be unfortunate if the Michigan coaching
staff, as well as the coaching staffs of other north-
ern universities, concludes that the manner to avoid
situations of this type in the future is to refrain
from coaching and playing promising Negro ath-,
letic material. That is certainly a possibility, and
if it is one which the rabid pro-Ward group over-
looked it is only another indication of the short-
sightedness of that' faction. But the easier and
more decent way, both for the students who com-
prise the University and the people of the State
wh n nnrt that Uiversit, is not to schedil

STATE STREET
HEADQUARTERS FOR LECTURE

UNIVERSITY
BOO KSTORE
MAIN STREET
COURSE TICKETS

The Ward Meeting

0_,

I

To the Editor:
MAY A DISGUSTED graduate student express
his thoughts on the conduct of certain groups
at the Ward fiasco of Friday night?
After four years at a provincial college, I came
to Michigan for the express purpose of exposing
myself to the broadening "cultural influence" of
this great University. For many years I had heard
of the spirited discussions prevalent upon this
campus, and on Friday night I attended the Ward
meeting as a disinterested non-participant, hoping
to witness a refined and scholarly debate. What
did I find?
Much to my disillusionment, a hostile audi-
ence, interested in but one side of the question, and
led by an arrogant, aristocratic fraternal group,
refused to confine their opposition to the estab-
lished mediums of logical refutation. Insisting on
preventing opposing speakers from stating their
convictions, this gang adopted Hitleristic tactics of
shouting down any speaker who differed with their
dogmatic pre-conceived notions.
Not content to even listen like gentlemen, they
shouted irrelevant and frequently abusive com-
ments at even the sincere professors who rose to

REPRESENTATIVE BLOOM of New York is in-
volved in a legal argument for one of his
youngest, successful constituents.
Ruth Sheneczynsky, the 10-year-old pianist, is
planning a concert here soon. But the district laws
prohibit juvenile work.
However, Ruth has a good advocate. One time
Bloom went to bat for a Turkish child being held
at Ellis island. "Because she is feeble minded, she
won't talk to us," said immigration inspectors.
"Nonsense," said Bloom. He made the inspectors
hide behind a fence and watch the child' at play
with other children. He won the case.
J. Edgar Hoover, chief of the Federal sleuths,
looks leisurely enough when he drops in for
dinner at one of the town's best rathskellers.
But his office knows just where he is and
calls him when any investigation "breaks."
His aides come under the same rule. Hoover
knows just where they are eating, and if they
go to a movie later, just where they will be
sitting.

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K EEP TH E FAMILY
INFORMED OF YOUR
STUDENT LIFE

4t moo,"
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