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October 19, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FIDAY, OCTOB

Lindbergh Hits U. S. Aviation Ruling As 'Blacklist'

Land Utilization Mrs. Sharnman Says
Newspaper Wo.rk Is '
Conference To
Fine Radio Training
Meet Next Week r
Mrs. Olive Sharman, program direc-

tinuity writer, Mrs. Sharman said a.
material author is the type of per-
son who writes for Ed Wynn or Joe
Cook and naturally must have a week
or two to think over the assignment,
while a contiuuity writer is merely an
advertising writer who writes to
"back-up" the programs.
When asked what training a con-
tinuity writer should have, Mrs. Shar-
man answered, "I think a newspaper
office is the best training for every-
thing."

The University will again play hostI
to the Annual Land Utilization Con-I
ference of timberland owners and
others interested in the wild land,

for and chief continuity writer for
Station WJR, was interviewed over
the radio yesterday by Prof. Waldo
Abbot, director of University broad-

problem of the state this year. The casting.
mrnetin s will be held Oct. 26-27 at Mrs. Sharman, a former newspaper
the Union. woman, said she thought writing,
Fostered by President Alexander G. dramatics, and radio were really very
Ruthven and the Conservation de- much alike. When asked if she would
partment, the first day's activities will not like to go back to printer's ink, she
be centered around a discussion of the answered. "If I were out of radio, yes.
Code of Fair Competition for the I didn't know I was going into radio
Timber and Lumber Industries, par- when I went into it. I thought I was
ticularly Article 10, which commits in- still in newspaper work."
dustry to have lands in productive In explaining the difference be-
condition after logging, provided the tween a material writer and a con-
public gives adequate co-operation. ---_ _ _ _ _
Also on the program for the first, --- =
day is E. W. Tinker, United States
regional forester from Milwaukee, who I After that
will discuss "Possibilities of Sustained
Yield on Lakes States Timber Lands." FOOT LBALL GAM E
On the second day of the conference
State Senator Moore will speak on jE oy ur
"Taxation in Michigan and Its Effect Enjoy Ou
on Timberland Management." Hospitality
Following the first day'shmeeting !
there will be a luncheon at the Union
to which ladies are invited. After the
luncheon Friday, Mrs. Ruthven will
give a tea for the ladies from 4 p.m. 5th A venu
to 6 p.m. lii : t 'A venue

Y. .ij

i

DANCE at
GRANGER'S
--Tonight and Tomorrow
GALE HIBBARD and His
12-PIECE BAND
Men 40c Ladies 25c
-.

i
I
_
; .

-Associated Press Photo
Col. Charles A. Lindbergh is shown as he appeared before the President's aviation commission in
Washgngton and said "one of the most disturbing factors" in American aviation was Postmaster General
Farley's ruling that no company whose officials participated in a conference for allocation of airmail routes

tative system of government expresses could bid in the new letting if suc
the will of the people so inadequately industry's best leaders. Shown wit
and so inefficiently that Congress and
all political activities are made the
butt of jokes and innuendoes in all our Prof. Bromage Defends
press. Worst of all, many men are
seriously questioning whether the col- Reorganization Proposal
onists chose wisely in selecting a dem- Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the
ocratic form of government for these I
United States. political science department, and one
Professor Courtis declares, "the of the committee of five which drafted
'New Deal' is an attempt to capitalize the county reorganization proposal
the general feeling that present con- defended this proposed amendment
ditions are intolerable and that fun-I Wednesday night before the Ann Ar-
damental changes must be made," he bor Teachers' club in the ballroom of
says. the League.
Universal education has always Professor Bromage pointed out that
been believed indispensible to our the present county and township or-'
priceless democratic order, believes
Professor Courtis. Yet, appropriations
have been cut, salaries reduced,
schools closed, and the ideal of uni-
versa1 education itself called in ques-
tion.
In addition to this discussion in
"The Goals of Public Education in
Michigan," this new issue contains
an article by Dean J. B. Edmonson of
the School of Education on "A Field
Course for Administrators and Super-
visors," which considers the problem I
of 'the tremendous volume of signifi-
cant findings in educational fields,
that so exceed in numbers the capacity
of the individuals to read.
: The October issue will inaugurate
the new cover design, which was se-
lected last year after a conference of
46 artists, students, faculty men,
and typographers.

ch officials kept their jobs. The "blacklist," he said, included some of the
th Lindbergh is Clark Howell of Atlanta, chairman of the commission.

ganizations were basically antiquated,
and that the long ballot, the lack
of co-operation between the county
officers and the county board of su-
pervisors, the lack of a chief execu-
tive, and the excessive size of super-
visory boards distinctly show the need
for reorganization.
According to the proposed amend-
ment no single county must change
its form of government, but it is
merely an amendment giving any
county desirous of so doing, the option
of reorganizing.

Friedmann Will Address
University Bird Club
Dr. Herbert Friedmann, curator of
birds at the U.S. National Museum
in Washington, will address the Uni-
versity Bird Club at 8 p.m. today.
The meeting, the first since the
opening of school, will be held on the
fourth floor of the Uniiversity Mu-j
seum.
Dr. Josselyn Van Tyne, curator in
the Zoology Museum will also speak.

EXPERT PRINTING
LETTERHEADS - ENVELOPES
PROGRAMS - BIDS
The ATHENS PRESS
206 N. Matn - Downtown
(Next to Postoffice )

Diner
Phone 9227
210 South 5th Avenue
Open All Night

7 '' . II =v.AI1 z-----I----1- -11-- .

This is
DRAGOON"
and it is smart!
"Dragoon" is a style

coat through

and

through.
shoulders .

The raglan
.. the full-

draping chest ... the
immense sweep .
the ring buckle belt
. . every feature is

stamped "O.K."

by

young men who rate
their clothes by style
points.
By no one else but
Varsity-town!
Wild4&"Co.
State Street on the Campus

KOSTELANETZ ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS
9 P. M. (E. S. T.) -COLUMBIA NETWORK

--------------

10

CA

and

V

IF

u

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1

A

Eight Other Important Concerts, including BOSTON and
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRAS, DON COSSACK CHORUS,

Tickets for Single Concerts:
$1.00, $1.50 and $2.00, and for
the Season (10 Concerts)

I

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