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October 14, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Publish~ed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
s5ociated ogltgiate r¢s
-s1934 Vinejez 1935~
'IIEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post.Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
'~CITY EDITOR ...... ,....... ..JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR...........RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EITOR....................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
'N NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene. David G. Macdonald.
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates. Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
' Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
"'Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
* Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
5 Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
~'Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levn, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger, Dorothy
r~ Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER ..........ROBERT S. WARD
" WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
' den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts.
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, . William
'Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hardenbrook, John Park, F. Allen Upson, Willis Tom-
linson, Homer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
S Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland. Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder. Margaretta
Iohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper.

Educational
Pitfall.. .
HOW DO YOU PRONOUNCE "eco-
nomics?" Do you say "eckonomics"
(with the "eck" short as in "egg")? Or is it more
correctly pronounced "eckonomics" (with the "eek"
sounding like a woman's scream when she sees a
mouse)?
It has come to our attention that those gentle-
men who expound the principles of that social
science say "eek." They maintain up and dow that
the only way to pronounce economics is "eeko-
nomics." That should certainly settle the issue -
but it doesn't.
That eminent group of grammarians, the Eng-
lish department faculty, begs to disagree. In their
opinion, economics should be pronounced "ecko-
nomics." A few of the English pedagogs confess
that "eekonomics" might be permissible, but affirm
that "eckonomics" is really right.
The battle has not come out in the open yet.
It lies smouldering under the surface. But when-
ever the economists get a chance they slyly empha-
size the "eek." And, in retaliation, the English
professors turn up their noses and say "Even an
'eckonomist' should know how to pronounce 'ecko-
nomics.' "
Now how the "eck" are we poor students going
to know which way the darn word should be pro-
nounced?
As Others See I t
U.S.C. Abolishes 'Hell Week'
PADDLING, TUBBING, and "Hell Week" as prac-
ticed by the fraternities at the University of
Southern California were abolished last week by
Dr. Rufus B. von Klein-Smid, president of that
university.
In issuing this statement the president said
that the action was prompted by the fact that "the
university is obligated to protect the health and
well-being of all students under its supervision and
to justify the faith and confidence placed in it
by parents and patrons."
Some of the common practices specifically pro-
hibited by the new ruling were physical paddling,
tubbing, exposure, deprivation of sleep - below a
daily minimum of seven hours - any kind of rough
handling, and dictating orders to pledges by other
than properly designated fraternity officials.
"Hell Week" will be replaced by a "probationary
week," and this does not mean that the name
alone will be changed. At the beginning of each
semester, every fraternity shall submit for approval
to the counselor of men a statement of the ob-
jectives of its probationary week, together with a
detailed outline of the program or plan of proce-
dure to be followed.
This plan indicates a way in which the Univer-
sity of Illinois can abolish "Hell Week." For several
years authorities on the campus have been trying
to convince fraternities that "Hell Week" as it is
practiced on this campus is harmful to students.
Dr. Beard of the University Health Service has
repeatedly testified as to the detrimental effects
of this week to which all pledges have to submit.
Professors have complained of the general decline
that is noted in the scholastic work of pledges.
Last year a number of pledges were unable to stay
awake in their classes because actives had pre-
vented them from sleeping the previous night.
Several of the leading fraternities on this campus
have practically abolished "Hell Week." The men
in these fraternities realize that paddling and other
physically abusive means encourages anything but
respect and brotherhood. However, there are still
a number of fraternities who still carry on the old
practice. The leaders of these houses usually have
a scholasticaverage of 2.8 and they cannot be
persuaded to accept any intelligent course of
action. An appeal has been made to them at other
times without results. These individuals will never
give up their rights to punish a pledge who cannot
defend himself.
The solution to this situation lies in action on
the part of University authorities.
"Hell Week" has no place in an intelligent stu-
dent body.

-The Daily Illini.

By BUD BERNARD
Here's a. contrib coming from a Deke at the
University of Southern California:
AD FRATERNIUM FRATO
Who's the guy who steals my ties
And wears my tux and tells me lies,
Who necks my women and swills my boose
Borrows my spats and wears my shoes,
Who sticks me for ten when the check comes
from mom
Grabs my best gal and goes to the prom,
Who cuts his classes and steals my notes,
Leaves college a Phi Bete and me a goat,
But he's one in a million (Thank Gawd)
And there'll never be another
Like that snake-in-the-grass
MY FRATERNITY BROTHER!
* , . .
A "widow's club" has been formed at North-
western University. It is composed of that group
whose sweethearts do not attend school. All mem-
bers wear yellow ribbons to signify that they do not
care to have dates.
A woman's past, says a junior at the Univer-
sity of Illinois is either scandalously indecent
or shamefully uninteresting.
* * * *
University of Utah men say that co-eds are un-
interesting, unintelligent, and expect nothing but
patter from their dates. Anyway they believe all
the select women are mortgaged before coming to
school.
A logic student at the University of Missouri
sends me this little pome:
Einie, meenie, minie, moe.
Throw 'em up and let 'em go
There they fall, let them stay
The furthest one will get an A.
From Lake Forest College we hear that 69 per
cent of the co-eds talk over their love affairs with
their mothers. Thirty-one per cent said that they
had no love affairs, and that makes 11 per cent
liars.
* *
Why is it asks an A.E. Phi that when a co-ed
turns out the light her prospects usually be-
come brighter,
Education while you sleep. The College of the
City of New York is experimenting with hypnosis
as a method of communicating facts. If it works,
students will sleep a semester and get a four-year
college education.

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER

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1934

Write Your Own Receipt
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Maynard Street
Read The
DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADS
The Daily maintains a
Classified Directory
for your
convenience.

V

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-P
NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL J. ELLIOTT

Washington
Off The Record

Sackcloth
And Ashes.

j THERE'S NO DOUBT about it now.
y All that we have lived for these
many years has crumbled about us. Our castles
have tumbled into the abyss. We are left without
a god. Life no longer embodies any purpose for
us.
That Michigan should have been beaten by
Michigan State was bitter medicine indeed. That
the Wolverine should have been not only beaten
but actually humbled by Chicago, for so many
years the Conference doormat, is unthinkable. Yet
it has happened.
These unexpected happenings have fallen upon
a generation of Michigan students who had never
known a football team that was not champions of
the Western Conference. In a period of 15 years
only once had a Wolverine team ever been de-
feated by as much as 25 points. State had not
beaten a Michigan team since 1915, Chicago had
not won since 1919.

.y
.
s!
,,

Only death and taxes were more certain than
Michigan victory. When the bottom dropped out
of the stock market in 1929, Michigan football
teams became unquestionably the safest financial
investment on the market. So perhaps it is not
strange that we thought the Golden Days could go
on forever. No wonder students, alumni, and others
were unprepared for the holocaust of the last two
weeks.
Resort to history must be our only consolation.
Inspection of the dim past shows that after every
period'of glory comes a time of humbling degrada-
tion. You have to go pretty far back to show it in
Michigan's case, but other schools are proving it
even today.
History assures us of another thing. As long as
Michigan was still rated as the favorite or as a very
dangerous opponent, the pressure was almost in-
surmountable. That situation is rapidly passing.
Just as soon as the public begins to underrate
Michigan's importance, when opponents begin to
think lightly of our -power, when our own team
discovers that it is going to have to start from
scratch, when the student body wakes up to the
fact that the season's results reflect their own in-
difference - then watch out for trouble!

Rushing The Theatres
FOOTBALL ENTHUSIASM took a sally in the
wrong direction last Friday night when a
rowdying band of students attempted to crash the
gates of the Indiana Theatre. A protesting police
force was bombarded with apples in the melee.
After some time the managers of the theatre
opened the doors to the would-be crashers, not
because the management and the Bloomington law
officers could not subdue the onrush, but because
the show house owner could see no harm in allow-
ing them to witness the second evening showing at
9 p.m. after most of the regular theatre patrons
had left.
No better example of how NOT to show loyalty
to Indiana's football team can be offered than
such childish actions as these. Last year the In-
diana theatre was the largest contributor to the
Indiana band fund. For several years this movie
house and the Princess Theatre have demonstrated
their support of the Indiana football team in a
tangible way by holding benefit shows to swell the
travel fund for the University band. At numerous
games away from home the Hoosier band has been
the only visible or audible support offered the
team from the sidelines. It is a poor brand of
school spirit that must manifest itself in rushing
theatres. The managers of the local theatres are
deserving of better treatment by University stu-
dents.
Several years ago five students were summarily
dismissed from the University for these identical
tactics, and justly so. Theatre crashing is little
mnr than nettv thiever vcloaked behind a false

By SGRID ARNE
RUTH BRYAN OWEN, minister to Denmark, is
still convincing herself that the remark of the
Eskimo village king of Greenland was a compli-
ment.
Mrs. Owen was in conference with him and the
governor of Greenland. He asked a favor, and the
governor asked Mrs. Owen her opinion. She ruled
in favor of the "king."
The "king" smiled and said knowingly in his own
language, "We old ones must stick together."
The governor changed color and explained hur-
riedly that Eskimos mean "wise" when they say
"old."
White House thumbnail: Long after mid-
night and the President still at work in his
study. Mrs. Roosevelt tip-toeing down the hall,
wrapped in a lounging robe. She peeks in the
door. The President looks up and smiles.
"Even presidents must get some sleep," she
says.
The President laughs and puts away his
papers.
THE LAURELS for futility are handed a Wash-
ington hostess who had a typical Washington
conglomeration at her house.
She looked about. Guests were growing inco-
herent. Others were arguing loudly. A glass broke.
She descended on the coolest looking gentleman,
waving her hands vaguely, and asked:
"Can't we get these people to play games?"
Secretary Ickes phoned his attorney in Chi-
cago to find out whatwas delaying a report
of the commission which heard disbarment
proceedings he brought against two Chicago
attorneys.
Irked by the delay, Ickes observed:
"Lawyers don't know what speed means,
They are all a bunch of duds."
Ickes is a lawyer.
REMODELING at the White Houe results at
times in almost impassible groups standing in
the doorway.
One such time a pretty, blonde young woman
skirted the edges of the crowd looking hopelessly
for a way to enter.
She was propelled through the crowd by a smil-
ing man visitor who had seen her predicament.

'
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If none of these things happens soon enough,
those teams that have waited a long time for
the day when they could trample the Maize and

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