100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1934 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY s

UINDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1934

Lindbergh Entering Court To Give Testimony

Break Seen As
Farley Assails
Gifford Pinchot
Governor Charged With
"Political Somersault"
By Postmaster - General
WASHINGTON, Oct. 6. - (AP) - A
yawning chasm opened today between
Gov. Gifford Pinchot, who has been
called a "Roosevelt Republican," and
Postmaster General Farley, the Pres-
ident's chief political aide.
The capital sat up and took notice
as Farley assailed the Pennsylvania
governor for coming out for the re-
election of Senator David A. Reed, Re-
publican.
Gov. Pinchot, an old Bull Mooser,
sought last spring to wrest the Repub-
lican nomination from Reed, who is
widely regarded as a spearhead of the
regular Republican attack on the na-
tional Democratic' administration.
Pinchot was defeated. The Democrats
nominated Joseph F. Guffey.
Recently Pinchot made a speech in
Wilkes-Barre in which, Farley said,
he expressed "his definite purpose to
aid in the re-election" of Reed.
Gov. Pinchot's political somersault,
is, to say the least, a trifle bewilder-
ing," Farley added. "In his speech an-
nouncing his return to the Republican
party, he proclaimed his high regard
for and deep confidence in President
Roosevelt and the President's policies.
"I wonder how he reconciles this
with his definite purpose to aid in the
re-election as United States senator of
David A. Reed, who is perhaps the!
most outstanding foe of the Presi-
dent's policies and who will, if he is
re-elected - which I am sure he will
not be - do everything in his power
to hamper the President's program
and to make a misdeal out of the
New Deal."

* THE SCREEN *:

AT THE MAJESTIC
*.*"CHAINED"
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer feature, pro-
duced by Hunt Stromberg. Starring
Joan Crawford and Clark Gable; featur-
ing Otto Kruger and Stuart Erwin.
Directed by Clarence Brown. Photog-
raphy by George Folsey.
"Chained" is a good picture. But I
didn't like it. Its substance is the
glamor of love pitted against the pity
and loyalty and its ramifications are
fear and uncertainty to follow one's
judgments. This sounds bad, and yet
when the essence of the film is boiled
down, the remainder glares you in the
face as being a state of leisurely doing
nothing drawn out to make an enter-
taining film last for a long enough
time.
The most admirable part of the film
is its presentation of the pathos of
kindness hungering for affection, un-
derstood and appreciated, but destined
to disappointment because the fates
just meant the object for someone
else. Translated into the terms of the
plot this means that a triangle exists
between Miss Crawford, Otto Kruger,
and Clark Gable. Mr. Kruger loves
Miss Crawford and showers her with
every kind of luxuries imaginable.
Miss Crawford likes him and feels
that she owes him something for all
that he has done for her.' Here is
where the villian enters. Miss Craw-
ford falls in love with Mr. Gable,
unfortunately, and the compliment
is returned. The conflict is between
true love on one hand, and respect,
pity, and loyalty on the other.
In many ways the plot resembles
the one in "Sisters Under the Skin"
which featured Elissa Landi and
Ralph Morgan. The same conflict was
present there too. But in "Chained"
the atmosphere takes on a more seri-
ous cloak, as opposed to the former
film, where there was a mixture of

satire, fantasy, and humor. Clark
Gable and Joan Crawford are getting
so that their type of acting can be
appreciated and their limitations re-
alized without resorting to the class
of wise-cracks that have found camp-
ing grounds in the past in this column.
Crawford is no Duse and Gable is io
Barrymore, but the two are very
capable at the type of characteriza-
tion that Hollywood puts out nine
times out of ten. That is to say, for
light comedy and an occasional se-
rious moment they are as good as any.
For film fans that go for the mushy
stuff, this film is just up their alley.
For those who attend with an eagle
eye and an Indian's ear tuned to catch
anything risque, this film will also
do. But for those who are bored stiff
with the eternal triangle, with so-
ciety wit, and close-ups of beautiful
faces uttering exquisite philosophies
of nothings, my advice is to hold their
horses until more pictures of ideas
are exhibited. -Jack C. Seidel.
Two Local Doctors Get
Proficiency Certificates
Two Ann Arbor men, Dr. Karl May
Malcolm, surgeon, and Dr. G. Merle
Dixon, dentist, were among a group
of 19 awarded "certificates of profi-
ciency" yesterday by the post-grad-
uate department of the medical
school.
Those eligible are signed up to par-
ticipate in the post-graduate work
offered by the medical school. More
than 300 physicians are enrolled.
EXPERT PRINTING
LETTERHEADS - ENVELOPES
PROGRAMS -BIDS
The ATHENS PRESS
206 N Main - Downtown
(Next to Postoffice)

I?

-Associated Press Photo
This picture was taken as Col. Charles A. Lindbergh entered the
courtroom to testify as a state's witness in the extortion trial of Bruno
Hauptmann in connection with the notorious case of the kidnaping of
the Lindbergh baby two years ago. Police plan to charge Hauptmann
with the baby's murder when the present trial is concluded.

Student Christian Association cab-
inet neeting Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
Please be prompt. All reports and
names of committeemen due.
Committeemen on Dr. Bell Lecture
are to meet in the office of Dr. L. W.
Blakeman, Room 9, University Hall,
Monday afternoon at 4:30.
R'indezvous Orchestra: Three saxo-
phone players wanted. Report to Al
Cowan at Lane Hall, Monday after-
no n at 3 o'clock for tryouts. Bring
instruments.
All men students interested in arch-
ery report to R. W. Webster, Intra-
mural Sports Building, Monday, Oct.
8, 4:30 p.m., for an organization meet-
ing.
All men students interested in
gymnastics meet at the auxiliary
gymnasium, Intramural Sports Build-
ing, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 4:30 p.m., for an
organization meeting.
League Social Committee: There
will be a meeting in the League, Tues-
day, 4 o'clock.
Michigan Dames: The study group
will meet on Monday, Oct. 8, 8 p.m.,
Michigan League. There will be a
special speaker. Also, plans for the.
year will be discussed and the group
formally organized.
Bridge Group of the Michigan
Dames will meet Tuesday evening,
Oct. 9, in the Alumnae room of the
League. Both Auction and Contract
will be played and all Dames who are.
interested in bridge are cordially in-
vited to come. The play will start
promptly at eight o'clock.

Research Body
Resumes Study
In footh Decay
An extensive study of the cause and
control of teeth decay has been re-
sumed by a research group of the
School of Dentistry, Dr. Russel W.
Bunting said in an interview yester-
day. This work which was curtailed
last year because of lack of funds,
has been made possible again through
the aid of a new sponsor.
Dr. and Mrs. Phillip Jay Hadley,
dental bacteriologists, Dr. Martha
Hoehne, nutritionist, and Dr. Julius
White, chemist, have been engaged
especially to aid in this research. They
are studying children at the Lucas
County Children's Home in Maumee,
O., and are also carrying on experi-
ments in the University Hospital and
in the Dental Clinic. Dr. Bunting re-
ported that decay in the teeth of
300 children already has been either
controlled, or entirely prevented.
The research group is spending
much time, at the present, attempting
to produce a vaccine that would elim-
inate all decay. "There have been in-
dications of a possibility of such a
vaccine," Dr. Bunting said, "but we
have nothing definite to announce as
yet."
Dr. White, working in collaboration
with Dr. Howard Lewis, is examining
the chemical differences in the saliva
of persons who have decay and ones
who have not.
Seyfried Jewelers
Dealers in Watches,
Clocks and Jewelry
HIGH GRADE REPAIRING
304 South Main St.

Oratorical Association Lecture Course

RUTH BRYAN OWEN
"This Business of Diplomacy"

LOWELL THOMAS
ea4dventures on the Air and
Around the World"

STUART CHASE
"The Economy of Abundance"

OEE -THDE-COUNTE

OF SEASON

TICKETS OPENS TOMORROW

AT 1:30

at WAHR'S BOOKSTORE

11,

READ THE
CLASSIFIED ADS

I

a.

A

ti
t
mlt

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
Established 1863
Oldest National Bank
In Michigan
Every Banking Service Available
Domestic - - - Foreign
STUDENT ACCOUNTS INVITED
Under U. S. Government Supervision
Member Federal Reserve System

LYMAN BEECHER
STOWE
"Saints, Sinners and Beechers"

oil
BURTON HOLMES CHESTER S. HOWLAND MARK SULLIVAN
"Around the World With "Hunting Whales in the "The Great Adventure at
Burton Holmes" Seven Seas" Washington"

j Season Ticket Prices (8 Num bers). $3.OO--$2.75--$2.50

E1

. !

_I ____i .__ _ _.. T __

_____

p ' .- r'v'1_tl..

. -.,'
~Y1

I 4~k1-1I. I- - I I ~-~----- I ~ I

c rcr J' vwr uuJ

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan