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March 03, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

trauss, joness
Man To Choose
Book Of Month
heir Selection Will Be
Placed In Pendleton Li-
brary Of The Union,
the book of the month, as de-
mined by Professors Louis A.
'auss and Howard M. Jones of the
glish department, will hereafter be
rchased by the Union and placed
the Pendleton Library for student'
, it was announced yesterday.
Professors Strauss and Jones will
leavor to select every four weeks
it book which they consider to be
best for the period and of the
atest value to student readers.
First to be named is "The Man of
Renaissance," by Ralph Roeder.
e book concerns Savonarola, Ma-
avelli, Castiglione, and Aretino,
>laining that the four men illus-
te four phases of the moral life
their age and, taken together,
ripose the man of the Renaissance.
No thinking man who lived dur-
those four brief momentous dec-
s of the culmination of the Ital-
Renaissance, between 1494 and
0, was the same when the period
s over," the foreword states, "and
the lives of the four protagonists
the period it is possible to trace
s development; they focus and
eshorten it, and they complement
another with a logical continu-

Pu-Yi's Altar; Killer Of Rasputin; Young Smoot Quizzed
-Associated Press Photos

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Calls Teaching
Worst Paid Of
Aill Professions

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Edmonson Says Teachers
Must Enter Field For
'Joy Of The Work'

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The story of a tragedy which startled the world was told in a Lon-
don courtroom when Prince Felix Youssoupoff (left), related how he
killed the monk Rasputin. His testimony was given during a hearing
of the suit of his wife, Princess Irina Youssoupoff (right), for $2,000,000
damages against a motion picture company. She alleged the film "Ras-
putin and the Empress" libeled her by linking her identity "objection-
ably" with Rasputin.

Teaching, termed the "worst paid
and the best rewarded" of the pro-
fessions, is a field into which one
must enter for the joy of the work,
Dean J. B. Edmonson of the School
of Education stated in a discussion
of "Teaching as a Career" over the
vocational guidance program broad-
cast on the University radio hour
yesterday.
"It must be admitted that teach-
ers' salaries, in general, are limited,"
he said. "No teacher will ever be-
come rich on his salary in the way
that some lawyers, dentists, doctors,
or men in business and commercial
lines have become wealthy. There are,
however, many non-financial values
in teaching, and teaching has a
strong appeal to those who know that
a successful life and the building of
a personal fortune are not synony-
mous."
In discussing the possibilities in the
teaching field, Dean Edmonson
pointed out that while there is an
oversupply of teachers, the same con-
dition exists in every field. A teach-
er's salary tends to lag behind the
business cycle, being relatively high
in the early years of depression and
low in periods of prosperity, he
pointed out.
"It is definitely false that schools
are returning to the stage of private
control," Dean Edmonson said.
"America recognizes the need for ed-
ucation."
Dean Edmonson expressed his be-
lief that the use of the radio in edu-
cation will fill a definite need, espe-
cially in the field of adult education.
DANCING EVERY NIGHT
Except Monday at
PREKETE' S
GARDENS
above
The Sugar Bowl
No Cover Charge
109 and 111 S. Main St.

"Together they loom like so many
awgivers, raised by the age to. an-
swer its perplexities. Their lives em-
bodied the adventures of the basic
deas that men live by, and they de-
veloped them with such transparent
implicity and extreme consistency
hat they live on for posterity as
,ypes," the author has written.
In a book which is ostensibly a
)iography of four men, Mr. Roeder
ias given the whole teeming story
f Italy during the Renaissance pe-
'iod. ,The four men supply the pivot
zround which the story revolves: Sa-
onarola, the priestly fanatic, forcing
'eligion on a licentious Florence;
Vlachiavelli, the hero - worshipper,
reaching the merciless doctrine of
lespotism; Castiglione, the courtier,
tpholding the virtues of the aristo-
ratic ideal in the face of a world
hat had outgrown it; and Aretino,
he "Scourge of Princes," seeking the
Atimate truth in man himself, and
iving out his life on the bright Ve-
ietian lagoon.
U.S. Swin Toward
Inflation Predicted
By Penn Economist
(By Intercollegiate Press)
PHILADELPHIA, March 1. - Real
anger of inflation is seen in the
resent trend of events by Dr. S.
toward Patterson, professor of eco-
omics at the University of Pennsyl-
ania.
"Maybe I'm wrong. I hope and pray
hat I am," he said. "But as re-
avery goes along, bank deposits will
icrease, bank credit will have to ex-
and, and when that happens on top
f the monetary inflation I see ser-
)us difficulties.
"I lived through the inflation in
ermany. In 1923 a dollar would buy
0,000 marks. Three weeks later it
ought 4,000,000 marks. You say we
ill never do that? Yes, I know. But
xermany didn't intend to, either,
how me one country that ever
arted on the inflationary path that
id not find it, very difficult to get

This is an artist's conception of the most picturesque ceremonies incidental to the enthronement of
Henry Pu-Yi, former child ruler of China, as emperor of Manchukuo, the world's newest empire. It depicts
the emperor's sacrifice to heaven at dawn on an "Altar of Heaven" copied from the marble structure at
Peiping where Pu-Yi's ancestors sacrified for centuries. Standing atop a triple-terraced shrine, the new
ruler placed on tables sacrificial offerings of Manchurian fruit, grain and vegetables. Highest Manchukuo
officials occupied the first terrace of the alter. On the ground at either side of the steps were musicians
with instruments like those used in worship of Confucius. Behind the musicians were Manchukuo officials
of the first and second grade. This sketch was based on a diagram made by an Associated Press corre-
spondent from official plans of the "Altar of Heaven" as worked out by Pu-Yi, and also on photographs of the
Peiping model.

'Small College' Plan Considered
By Economies Students, Faculty

An effort was made recently by
faculty and students of the econom-
ics department to combine the ad-
vantages of equipment and expert
instruction offered by a large colle-
giate institution with the personal
contacts between student and in-
structor enjoyed in smaller institu-
tions.
The purpose of the meeting, which
was held at the Union and was at-
tended by the entire economics fac-
ulty, undergraduates concentrating
in the subject, and graduate stu-
dents, was to consider organization
of a discussion group and "other
matters of mutual interest." Both
students and faculty were enthusias-
tic concerning an organization of
this sort, which for the first time
would bring undergraduates in closer
contact with members of the faculty
and other students in a department.
This is the first year that the con-
centration requirement for gradua-
tion has become effective, and this
embryonic economics group is the
first organization of its kind to re-
sult from the system.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, chairman of
the economics department, said edu-
cational mass production could be
modified or destroyed utterly, even
in large universities such as Michi
gan, if plans which would permit th(
closer intellectual contacts between
students of common interests among
themselves and also with the faculty
of their department could be effected
Dr. Ruthven To Talk At
Midland Alumni Dinner
President Alexander G. Ruthven
has accepted the invitation of the
University of Michigan Club of Mid-
land to address the members of the
organization at their annual ban-
quet Thursday evening, March 8.
T. Hawley Tapping, general sec-
retary of the Alumni Association, and
Frederick S. Randall. also of the
Alumni Association, will accompany
Dr. Ruthven as guests of the club.

The organization has selected a
committee of six members divided
between undergraduates and gradu-
ates to plan the organization of the
group. Whether the two "factions"
will combine or not will be discussed
by the committee at a meeting Mon-
day night.

Piunkennes Bad TIaste
HAVERFORD, Pa., March 2 - 6P)
If students at Haverford College
do not drink esthetically, it is not
the fault of the News, their weekly
newspaper. It has printed instruc-
tions.
"Drunkenness is the height of bad
taste," it says, adding: "The man
who can tell 1921 champagne or Na-
poleon brandy should be more ad-
mirable than a total abstainer."
Also, "liquor should never be car-
ried on the him"

Ernest W. Smoot ,left), son of former Senator Reed Smoot (right)
of Utah, appeared before Senate air mail investigators to testify that
"outside interests" paid him about $19,750 while he was receiving more
than $3,000 in 1929 as clerk for his father's Senate finance committee.

- - , .
..0

1 & fr'C
~1h t4

"I admit that prices have not risen
ry much. I hope I am wrong, but
think there iseserious danger of
flation getting out of hand."
ALLAN HOOVER A FARMER {
FRESNO, Calif., March 2- (41) -
aving a "white collar" job, Allan
>over, second son of former Presi-
nt Herbert Hoover, turned today to
e business of "dirt" farming. He
.d associates have purchased a 500-
re farm which Hoover will manage.'

You hear a lot today
about balanced diet-
.. and there's something too
in the way tobaccos are bal-
anced that makes a cigarette

milder and
better.

makes it taste

I keep

coming

back to

dl

that statement on the

back

Opening

of the Chesterfield package-

DanCe

Toni ht

9

CH ESTERFIELD-
---CGARETTES
ARE A BALANCED BLEND
OF THE FINEST AROMATIC
TURKISH TOBACCO AND
THE CHOICEST OF SEVERAL
AMERICAN VARIETIES
BLENDED IN THE CORRECT
PROPORTION TO BRING
OUT THE FINER QUALITIES
OF EACH TOBACCO.
REC. U.S. PAT. OFF.

-good music... fountain service . . .
toasted sandwiches ... fresh strawberry
shortcake - fifteen cents . .
-excellent waiter service . . . and the
prices are in keepina with the tavern

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UA

We believe you'll enjoy
n-ia

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