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February 28, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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TIree Killed In K1ansas When Train Hits Bus

Justice Bureau
Is Keeping Up
WithKidnapers
U. S. Reports 23 Solutions
Of 24 Cases Reported To
Federal Agents
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27.-A1-The
second anniversary Thursday of the
Lindbergh baby kidnaping will find
the justice department's bureau of
investigation more than ever deter-
mined to end the "snatch racket."
Twenty-three solutions of the 24
kidnaping cases turned over to the
department's special agents - that's
the bureau's record on its newest and
most thrilling job since the enact-
ment of the so-called "Lindbergh
law" June 22, 1932.
Meanwhile, the department is add-
ing 2,200 fingerprint records a day
to its index of who's who in crime,
,vhich at the end of last week had
1,200,000 such "calling cards" of
criminals.
J. Edgar Hoover, 39-year-old chief
of the bureau, makes criminal investi-
gation a one-man job for himself, in
a sense. H o o v e r, plump, pink-
cheeked and pompadoured, follows
personally every detail of a kidnap-
ing investigation from the time his
agents' begin it.
His 313 special agents, "D.J.'s" to
the underworld, are mostly young
men, although the staff includes
some veteran detectives. In choos-
ing new men, Hoover takes law
school graduates between 25 and 35
years old, and sometimes expert ac-
countants. All are given rigorous
training to test their ability and
capacity for work.
Tips, leads, letters, crank notes and
telephone calls begin to pour into
Hoover's office almost the moment
any person of consequence is kid-
naped. Sometimes these prove fruit-
ful, sometimes the best clew is more
or less an accident.
Hoover, who rose from a clerkship
to his present post, still has hope his
nen will solve the kidnaping of little
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.,
nearly two years ago.

-ASsocW sed Pres rnow
Shown here is the wreckage of a passenger bus in which the driver
and two passengers were killed when it collided with a heavy freight
truck in a blinding snow storm near Bethel, Kas. Four other passengers
of the bus were injured.

Professor Says
College Education
Retards Weddings
MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 27.-College
and professional groups tend to defer
marriage in comparison with the
general population, Dr. Clifford Kir-
patrick of the University of Minne-
sota said yesterday in differing with
Prof. George H. Von Tungel, Iowa
State College, who believes that more
young people are marrying and that
they are marrying younger.
Dr. Kirpatrick d e c la r e d recent
studies have shown the average col-
lege graduate does not marry until
he is 26 years old and that college
women are less likely to marry than
men. The brilliant female student
has more of a tendency to remain
single than others of her sex. This
Dr. Kirpatrick attributes to the fact
that fewer men reach the high stand-
ard of selection education has pro-
duced.
Depressed economic conditions,
Kirpatrick stated, has caused di-
vorce to decrease. He said that di-
vorce is expensive now and there is
less chance of improving one's stand-
ing therefore fewer marriages are
broken up by it.
Sunday Library Hours
Hoped For By Council
A possibility that the library may
remain open Sundays was disclosed
by Gilbert E. Bursley, president of
the Undergraduate Council, at the
second meeting of tryouts for the
Council, in room 306 of the Union
yesterday. Bursley said that many
students have requested that the li-
brary may remain open and that the
Council will work toward this end,
even attempting to raise money for
that purpose, if necessary.
Other minor matters were brought
before the tryouts before their dis-
missal. President Bursley invited
them to attend the regular meeting
of the Council later in the week and
become acquainted with the mem-
bers. Tryouts at the meeting, all of
whom belong to the class of '37, were:
Grant Barnes, Edmond DeVine, Rich-
ard Hinks, John Doelle, Robert Colas,
Gene Reichert, Edward Hutchinson,
William Dixon, Albert Grossinger,
Fred Walters, and Ronald Scott. The
third meeting is scheduled for next
Monday afternoon at the same place,

Meader Lauds
Esperanto As
Aid To Peace
International Language Is
Easy To Learn; Only 16
Grammar Rules Used
Esperanto, the international lan-
guage, was called one of the best
means of promoting peace and un-
derstanding between nations by Prof.
Clarence L. Meader in a lecture yes-
terday in Natural Science Auditor-
ium.
Speaking on the general features
of Esperanto, Professor Meader said
that it was extremely simple and
that a working knowledge of it could
be gained by the average student in
15 to 20 hours of study.
Uses But 3,000 Words
There are only 16 rules of gram-
mar, to which there are no excep-
tions, and a vocabulary of 3,000
words is sufficient to enable one to
write and converse fluently. Esper.-
anto is composed of root words tak-
en from many languages, so a large
proportion of the vocabulary is al-
ready known to everyone of medium
education.
It is estimated that there are 3,-
000,000 people in the world who
speak Esperanto, and there are about
100 periodicals published in that
tongue.
- Stresses Understanding
In speaking of Esperanto as a
medium of international peace, Pro-
fessor Meader said, "Unquestionably
one of the greatest obstacles tc
friendly relations among nations is
the misunderstanding resulting from
ignorance, distrust and hostility.
These would be greatly diminished
if all people spoke an auxiliary lan-
guage."
Professor Meader was introduced
by Dr. F. S. Onderdonk, of the Tol-
stoy League, under whose auspices
the lecture was given. Dr. Onder-
donk also passed a petition among
the audience protesting the suppres-
sion of constitutional rights in Aus-
tria; this petition is to be sent to
Chancellor Dollfuss of Austria.
According to Madame Albertine
Rasch, the model co-ed is a combina-
tion of Venus de Milo and Mae West.

I'

Says Britain Has
Per Cent No.

Four
1 Brains

(By Intercollegiate Press)
LONDON, Feb. 27-In his annual
report to the board of regents, Sir
Charles Grant Robertson, principal
of Birmingham University here, as-
serted that the combined percentage
of first-class brains in all classes of
Britain is as small as 4 or 5 per cent.
He went on to say that the suc-
cess of any university or college de-
pended on the institution receiving'
its share of these high class brains.
Perhaps 20 per cent. of the popu-
lation, he said, is subnormal in in-
tellectual capacity.
The report, it was indicated, was
the result of 40 years of experience
in educational work.
IS UTILITIES SECRETARY
LANSING, Feb. 27 .-(A)- The ap-
pointment of Peter Fagan, Lansing
newspaperman, as secretary of the
Michigan Public Utilities Commis-
sion was announced today.
He will succeed Roy Purkheiser, of
Monroe, who has held the position
for the past three years: The change
becomes effective March 15. ifl

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