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June 03, 1934 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Vistert Pitches Two-Hit Game To Defeat Iowa, 2-1

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* DUST
-By ART CARSTENS-

a

Hail And Farewell. . .
* * * .
N EVERY graduating class there are
athletic heroes among the cap-and-
gowned marchers. People point athem
out to their friends and laugh over
the incongruity of their appearance in
the voluminous robes instead of the
familiar football jersey or basketball
trunks.
They'll be there at Commencement
on June 16 again this year. Whitey
Wistert will tower inches above his
classmates, even the robes will scarce-
ly conceal Ted Petoskey's walk, and
Chuck Bernard's square figure will be
easily distinguishable. i
Walking in the black-robed col-
umns too will be other athletes who
won Varsity letters. They, however,
will not attract the attention of the
general crowd. Only their friends and
relatives will single them out, saying
to the rest of the group:
"There's Fred Ratterman. They call
him 'Michigan's hard-luck athlete' out
here. He was a high school sensation
but injuries have hampered him here.
He won only one letter, that in base-
ball this season."
"There's Louis Westover. He won
three major letters in football but was
never a regular. The headlines al-
ways had Kipke benching a star quar-
ter and giving Westover a chance, but
on Saturdays he sat on *the bench."
"There's Zit Tessmer, five-letter
man in football and basketball. Sel-
dom a regular and never a star, Zit,
hampered by injuries, had to stand
by and watch the youngsters take his
place."
"That tall fellow is Henry Kamien-
ski. He won three swimming letters
but no one ever heard of him much.
He was just a member of the free-
style relay team. Figure out some time
how much first or second places in
the relays can mean in important
meets."
"There's Ted Chapman, won six let-
ters in football, hockey and baseball.
Hardest worker I ever saw, Ted had
his heart set on being a football reg-
ular. What chance did he have with
Williamson, Petoskey and Ward all in
there? Nearly killed himself trying
to catch Wistert's pitches in baseball
this spring, splitting every finger on
his right hand in doing so."
"There's Bob Ostrander, winner of
two cross country letters. He was cap-
tain-elect of the team that the Board
in Control had to withdraw from In-
tercollegiate competition this year be-
cause of lack of funds. Some break for
him; eh?"
"There are Carl Savage and Oscar
Singer together over there., They both
won two letters in Football, both play-
ing guard. Both were over-shadowed
by their more famous teammates
playing next to them."
And so it goes every year, the hero
goes forth into the world heralded
by a fanfare of publicity. The-man-

Michigan Rises
To Third Place
In Conference
Team Finishes With .500
Mark In Big Ten; Five
Play Final Game
(Continued From Page 1)
on a ground ball. The Hawkeyes
tried a double steal, but Chapman's
throw arrived at third so fast that
Stephens looked foolish in his at-
tempted steal.
In the fifth inning wtih one out,
Schmidt beat out a hit to deep short
for the first safe blow off Wistert. He
took second on a wild pitch, and
scored on Ford's single to right. From
them on Wistert didn't allow a hit,
and only one man reached first,
ironically enough when Chapman
dropped a third strike.
Chapman split his finger in the
third inning, but he finished the game
despite intense pain which he suf-
fered. Ted had played every inning
of every game and he wanted to keep
his record intact, in his last game
for Michigan.
The victory placed Michigan in a
five-way tie with Iowa, Northwestern,
Purdue, and Chicago, for third place
in the Conference standings and the
game marked the last performance
for Artz, Chapman, Petoskey, Water-
bor, and Wistert, and ended the sea-
son for a Michigan team that had it
not made 18 errors in five of its Con-
ference defeats, would have won the
title.
Iowa

Russ Oliver Elected
1935 Baseball Captain
Russ Oliver, '35, Pontiac, was
elected captain of the 1935 baseball
team yesterday. Oliver has won
two letters as third baseman onL
the Michigan nine and is well on
his way to being a nine-letter man,1
withtwo awards in both football
and basketball. He is a good hitter
and one of the steadiest players
in the Wolverine infield.
No senior manager is to be
chosen. The following will be jun-
ior managers during the 1935 sea-
son: Warren Hill, Joe White, Bill
Eason, and Jim Kidson. Dan Ral-
ston is the alternate.
DikLutz Wins
A amps Golf
Championship
Dick Lutz, '35E, defeated DeWitt
Snyder, '36, 6 up and 5 to play yes-
terday at the University golf course
to win the all-campus golf cham-
pionship.
Lutz took the lead from Snyder on
the fifth hole of the first round and
stayed ahead until he ended the
match on the thirty-first hole. The
match was close until the twenty-
fifth hole, but Lutz unleashed a spurt
of par and sub-par at this point to
jump from 1 up to 6 up. The winner
shot an 80 for the first 18 holes, but
was only one over par figures on the
last 13.
Lutz, a transfer from Ashland Col-
lege is a well known figure in Cleve-
land golfing circles. Playing in the
Cleveland District Junior Amateur
four times, he was champion once,
runner-up once, and medalist twice.
He is affiliated with Chi Phi, while
Snyder is a member of Chi Psi.
The finalist's scores:
Par out .......545 434 434-36
Lutz outs;........ 556 434 525-39
Snyder out......548 445 534-42
Par in .........453 434 445-36
Lutz in.......454 544 636-41
Snyder in .......474 435 446-44
Second round:
Lutz out :....445 544 636-38
Snyder out......545 434 545-39
Lutz in.........354 3
Snyder in ....... 365 4
FROM RING TO BOX
Pat Malone, Chicago Cubs veteran
righthander, was a boxer before en-
tering baseball, and as a lad fought
41 professional fights as a lightweight
under the name of Kid Williams.
1.

Michigan Wins Two National,
Four Big Ten Titles In 1J933-34

(Continued from Page 8) }
on Sherf's long goal, but Minnesota's!
forward line of Munns, Grey, and
Russ was undoubtedly the finest for- I
ward combination ever to skate out
on the Coliseum ice and was able to
eke out a victory. The Gophers took
both games by scores of 3-1, and 2-1,f
and as George David said the follow-
ing day, "They were just too good."
The hockey team avenged itself a.
week later, however, when they de-
feated the Michigan Tech team of
Houghton to take the mythical cham-
pionship of Michigan. By dint of two
earlier victories over Wisconsin, Mich-
igan earned second place in the Big
Ten. Johnny Sherf was selected for
the Associated Press All-Conference
hockey team.
Basketball
Coach Franklin Cappon and his'
courtmen suffered one of the most
disastrous basketball seasons Mich-
igan has had in many years, but al-
though they finished in a tie for
eighth place in the final standings,
Michigan won four Conference games;
and dropped several more only by
very close scores, and topped off the
schedule with a 35-32 win over In-
diana.
Swimming
Once again Matt Mann succeeded
in moulding his squad of Michigan
natators into not only a Conference
championship aggregation, but also
into a well-rounded team which took
first place in the National Intercol-
legiates and was second only to the
New York Athletic Club in the na-
tional A.A.U. Dick Degener success-
fully defended his diving titles in all
these meets and Taylor Drysdale took
the backstroke title in the first two
and second in the A.A.U., and set a
new American record in the 300-yard
medley individual swim in the latter
swim.
Wrestling
The 1933-34 Michigan wrestling
team won two of its four dual meets,
took third in the Big Ten both in indi-
vidual and in dual competition, placed
Captain Art Mosier in the 145-pound.
class of the National Intercollegiates
to which they were host. The greatest
disappointment in this year's wres-
tling, at least from the fans' point of
view, was when the proposed grudge
match between Coach Cliff Keene
and Nick Londes, matchmaker of the
Arena Gardens in Detroit, failed to
go through.
Track
Coach Charlie Hoyt's fracksters
went through the indoor season unde-
feated in either dual or meet competi-1

tion. They soundly spanked Ohio
State, took a three-cornered meet with
State and Ypsi, another from Chicago
and Northwestern, and finished with
flying colors by winning both the Big
Ten indoor titile and the Butler re-
lays.
The outdoor team was not so for-
tunate. taking a second place in the
Drake Relays, two dual meets from'
Illinois and Ohio State. and third
place in the Con ference behind Ilinois
and Indiana,
Tennis
This year's Varsity tennis team, al-
though it lost four .non-Conference
matches, can claim the Big Ten dual
meet title because of her victory over
Chicago, the tournament champions
in 1933. The tennis team won dual
matches from Northwestern and Ohio
State and placed second in the Con-
ference, 21/2 points behind Chicago.
Baseball
Avon Artz led this year's Wolverine
nine to a tie for third place in the
Big Ten. Following an only moder-
ately successful eastern trip in which
the team was handicapped by a lack
of practice, the squad was stricken
by injury and finished the season
with a record of twelve victories and
the same number of defeats. Whitey
Wistert, Ted Petoskey, and Artz were
the -leading ball players on the squad,
the big tow headed first baseman
pitching several games which have
put Big League scouts on their toes,
and is expected to break into pro ball
next year if he is so minded.
Golf
The Wolverine golf team, without
the services of Captain-elect Johnny
Fischer, who left school to join the
American Walker Cup team abroad,
repeated its win of the past two-years
' in the Big Ten meet and swept
through eight dual meets without a
loss, scoring 155% points to 22% for
the opposition.
Without Captain Eddie Dayton,
confined to the Health Service, a four-
man team composed of Chuck Kocsis,
Woody Malloy, Cal Markham, and
Milt Schloss, the team set a new team
record in winning the Conference
title, as Kocsis scored a scorching 283
total to take individual honors with
Malloy close behind. A six-man team
will be entered in the National meet
at Cleveland, June 25 to June 30.

I

Stephens, 3d.
Drager, cf ..
Blackman, If.
Schutle, 2b ..
Baker, lb ....
Mason, ss ...
Claussen, rf
Schmidt, c .
Ford, p ......
Totals .....
Artz, rf .....
Oliver, 3b ... .
Petoskey, cf.
Paulson, 2b
Wistert, p . .
Regeczi, lf . .

AB
2
4
..4
..4
4
......4
.... 2
. ... . 3.4
3
Michigan
AB
4
3
3
..3
. .. . ...2
....,..3

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

H:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1

P0
1
2
0
2
8
2
0
8
1

A
0
0
0
3
1
3
0
1
2

E
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0

1 2 24 10 2

R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0,
0

H
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0

Po.
2
1
4
2
2
1
2
8
5

A
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
3
0

E'
0
0
0
0
0
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3
1
0

R

i

Waterbor, ss.......3
Chapman, c ......2
Lerner,. lb ........3

t
t

Totals .........26 2 3 27 6 4

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This saving goes DOUBLE!

HERE are thousands of easy ways to spend nihey,
Here's an easy way to save some . .. right now, when
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Greyhound's service to the Chicago World's Fair is espe-
cially attractive. Inquire at the local depot, or ask your
Greyhound student representative about convenient ex-
pense paid tours, saving time and money, both on the

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