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June 02, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-06-02

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THTE MICHIG~AN DILTY

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VICHIGAN DAILY Possibilities In
Co-operative Buying...

--x

e-tM or nw mom e .- - ~
cshed every morning except Monday during the
sit yearand Summer Session by the Board in
>l of Student Publications.
iber of the WesternConference Editorial Association
ie Big Ten News Service.
aciated e o ucait#Q r-
'~1933 rnst4Aw ?l 1 ' vcgPAGI1934 E
s.gIMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
ublication of all news dispathces credited to it or
;herwise credited in thti paper and the local' news
hed herein. All right s of republication of special
ches are reserved.
red at the cost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Aistant Postmaster-General.
cription durint; summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
During reguLar school year by carrier, $3.75; by
'4.25.
s: Student Publlcaticns Building, Maynard Street
bor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
esentatives: College Publications Representatives.
G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
n Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue.

T HE INTERFRATERNITY Steward',
Association at Cornell Universit3
has concluded its first year of operation, having
accomplished, according to the Cornell Daily Sun
a gross saving of six and a quarter per cent for
the houses which were members of the organiza-
tion.
Considerable doubt was felt in the beginning as
to the possibility of success on the part of the co-
operative buying association in achieving econ-
omies, and only 23 fraternities, about one-third of
the total number, joined. Despite this unfavorable
start, the group enjoyed a successful year and is
now considered rather firmly established for the
future.
The association handled during the year approx-
imately $100,000 in business, and turned back at
the end a five per cent rebate to each member
house, according to figures given by the Sun. These
rebates were obtained despite the fact that whole-
sale food prices in Ithaca were at a high level and
rose markedly during the year, and they were pos-
sible only through organization and large-scale
buying.
What has been done by a few Cornell fraternities
in a single year it seems might be accomplished
equally well in Ann Arbor, especially in view of the
marked similarity of conditions in the two cases.
Washngeton
O ff T he,:,Re1,c or d
AS____

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
GINO EDITOR..............WILLIAM G.HFERRIS
EDITOR...,............JOHN HEALEY
RIAL D IRECTOR............RALPH G. COULTER
rS EDITOR. ..............ARTHUR CARSTENS
N'S EDITOR.......................ELEANOR BLUM
r EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
roehn. Thomas H. Klcene, David G. MacDonald, John
)Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
I'8 ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
aeth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
'N'S ASSISTANTS: Dorothy Gies, Florence Harper,
aor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Rosalie
ick, Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
_.TERS: Donald K. Anderson, John H. Batdorff,
rt B. Brown, Clinton B. Conger, Robert E. Deisley,
i Dewey, John A. Doelle, Sheldon M. Ellis, Sidney
er, WilliamhH. Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin
ies, Ralph W. Hurd, Walter R. Krueger, John- N.
hant, Fred W. Neal, Xenneth Norman, Melvin C.
out, John P. Otte, Lloyd S. Reich, Marshall Shulman.
ard Weissman, Joseph Yage*, C. Bradford Carpenter,
b C. Siedel, Bernard Levick, George Andros. !'red
ser, Robert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Fried-
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.;
thyBriscoe, Maryana Chockly, Florence Davies. Helen
ndorf, Marian Donaldson, Saxon Finch, Elaine
berg, Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hath-
Marion Holden, Beulah Kanter, Lois King, Selma,
a, Elizabeth Miller, Melba Morrison, ;Mary Annabel
Ann Neracher, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger, Dor-
Shappell, Carolyn Sherman, Molly Solomon, Dor-
Vale, Betty Vinton, Laura Winograd, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
ESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
T MANAGER...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
:N'S BUSINESS MANAGER ..................
.......... ....... C THRINE MC HENRY
ITMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
ce, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
['ANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
al, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
3assett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,'
naa Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve ield, Louise
z, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
on, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
:ard, Betty "Simonds..
MAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
s, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
les Parker, Roert Owen, Ted Wohigemuth, Jerome
man, Avnor, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
:e, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
ian, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
enbrook, Gordon Cohn
[GHT EDITOR: JOHN M. O'CONNELL
R A Aid Deserves
dent Encouragement...
P ROF. LEWIS M. GRAM, director of
the committee on University FERA,
ip the situation concisely when he states that
.ition to enabling 752 University students to
ue their education, the Federal Emergency
Administration has done much to improve

By SIGRID ARNE
WASHINGTON- Madame Simopoulos, wife of
the minister from Greece, has good reason to
believe friendships can bud and bloom more quick-
ly in New York taxicabs than anywhere else.
She no sooner had entered one recently than
the driver burst out about his Great Dane which
had just had 10 pups. Mme. Simopoulos smiled so
sweetly that the driver exploded:
"Say, I'll just give you one."
"But I'd have to, take him back to Washington
on the train," said Mme. Simopoulos.
"Oh, that's all right," said the driver, 'I'll give
you a nursing bottle and some milk."
But the pup stayed in New York.
On the deck of Representative Ross Collins of
Mississippi there is a gilt baby shoe with engaging
little bulges which make it look as if it had just
come off a pudgy little foot.
It was one of the baby shoes worn by Collins'
daughter who is now a young lady. He had it
stiffened with gilt.
NEWTON D. BAKER, former secretary of war,
has been here for some of Washington's ex-
tremely changeable spring weather. He says it re-
minds him of the little boy who wanted a rifle.
"Santa Claus finally brought him one,"
Baker recounts. "After that the boy's diary
read like this: 'Christmas day - got rifle. Dec.
26 - rained. Dec. 27 - snowed. Dec. 28 - too
sleety to go out. Dec. 29 - shot Grandma!'"
Life is so exciting for Mrs. Henry T. Rainey,
wife of the speaker, that she has been wearing
someone else's coat for the past two weeks without
knowing it. Now she wonders, where she got it,
and who has hers.
William E. Barrett, the writer, has a seven-year-
old son.
The boy answered the phone as one of his fath-
er's Washington friends called.
"Father isn't home," said the boy. "What do you
want?"
"I want to make a date with your father to take
him out and feed him at lunch-time tomorrow,"
said the friend.
"Oh," said the boy, "don't bother. He doesn't
need it."
Attorney-General Cummings and his wife like
dancing so well they stay late with the "youngsters"
and take a few spirited swings around the floor
when the early-to-beds have left it somewhat
clear.
As Others See It

The Theatre
.s
BESTS AND WORSTS IN
A SEASON OF LOCAL DRAMA
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
THE WORD "LOCAL" in the above title desig-
nates Detroit and Ann Arbor. Ypsilanti is
omitted for various reasons, chief of which is the
fact that I have not seen any Ypsi shows this year.
Also I have had the pleasure of seeing only 50 per
cent of the Detroit shows; but, in consideration of
the fact that I have read no notices tending to
establish any presentations as better or worse than
those which I am noting, I feel justified in includ-
ing Detroit in this rating. And, finally, two Dra-
matic Season plays are yet to be judged. You can
see readily that the value of this score card is
reduced by considerably more than I could wish
you to believe.
My ratings, then, are as follows:
Scripts: Best dramas: Elizabeth the Queen
(Maxwell Anderson) and "Hedda Gabler" (Hen-
drik Ibsen). Best comedy: "Once in a Lifetime"
Kaufman-Hart). Best musical: "Meet My Sister"
(Verneuil-Benatsky). Worst play: "The Dark
Tower" (Wolcott-Kaufman).
Productions: Best dramas: "Elizabeth the
Queen" (Play Production, directed by Valentine B.
Windt) and "Hedda Gabler" (Eva Le Gallienne)
Best comedy: "Once in a Lifetime" (Play Produc-
tion, Russell McCracken). Best musical: "Gang's
All There" (Junior Girls' Play, Russell McCracken).
Worst production: "With Banners Flying" (Union
Opera, Milton Peterson).
Amateur performances: Best drama: Sarah
Pierce as Elizabeth in "Elizabeth the Queen." Best
comedy lead: Frank Funk as Topaze in "Topaze."
Best serious character: William Halstead as St.
Claire in "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Best comic charac-
ters: William Cutting as Herman Haufenmisst in
"With Banners Flying," and James V. Doll as the
prince in "See Naples and Die." There were, in
this category, no players bad enough, by amateur
standards, to be singled out as "worst."
Professional performances: Best drama: Eva Le
Gallienne as Hedda in "Hedda Gabler." Best com-
edy lead: Walter Slezak as Eric in "Meet My
Sister." Best serious character: R. Iden Payne as
a derelict cabbie in "The Pigeon." Best comic char-
acter: Olive Olsen as Irma in "Meet My Sister."
Most misconceived performance: Ainsworth Arnold
as Don Pedro in "Much Ado About Nothing."
High consistency ratings: Direction: Russell Mc-
Cracken for his excellent work in farce comedy.
Performances: Robert Henderson for five beauti-
fully played roles; Ainsworth Arnold for his effi-
ciency as a trouper: he will take any kind of a role
and give his best to it, making an interesting job
of it when direction and his natural limitations, will
permit him; Frank Funk for several grand inter-
pretations.
Most promising player: Sarah Pierce, whose fu-
ture is great if she learns to control a voice of
tremendous potentialities.
Although the paragraph about to be inserted is
irrelevant, it may possibly be considered legitimate
in a swan song. I want here to apologize for certain
instances in which rapid writing has led me inad-
vertently to insert personal remarks of .a cutting
nature. My judgments, however faulty, remain my
judgments, but occasionally they have been poorly
and offensively phrased. I want also to thank the
players in campus theatre for their comprehension
that I have tried always to write impersonally, and
for their resultant cordiality to me. It has been
a grand year for Ann Arbor theatre-in many ways
one of-the most significant on record - and I have
been truly fortunate in the opportunity to study
and appreciate the fine work which. has been done
by local thespians during the past season.I

BLUE STAR
Brand
SALT

TRY_
the Blue Star Water Soft=
aner Salt recommended by
all makers of softeners,
hand or automatic.
Sold.exclusively by
Herder Bros.
Michigan Salt Works
Marine City, Mich.

II

Nl0 S. Ashley

Dial 2-1713

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l'hone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department,
The classified columns close at Aive
o'clock previous to day of insertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance--lie per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
1=c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line for
one or two insertions.
14: per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line- 2 lines daily, one
month.. ... .... .....8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 +months ......3c
2 lines daily, college year ......7c
4' lines E. 0. D., college year ....7c
100 lines used as desired......9c
300 lines used as desired.......8c
1,000 lines used as desired..7
2,000 lines used, as desired .. 6e
The above rates are per reading line.
based on eight reading linCsrer inch of
71,x point Ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per line to above rates for
bold face capital letters.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox. darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
WANTED
TWO PASSENGERS wanted. Uni-
v'ersity mean and wife driving to
-New York or Boston and Vermont,
June 12-15. Phone 5023. 499
STUDENT, driving to Niagara Falls
Monday, June 4, desires passenger.
Call 8578, 498
FACULTY MEMBER wants student
chauffeur too drive car to New Ha-
ven, Conn. June 19. Call 5881.
497

Enjoy these pleasant hours out of doors
in the fresh air and sunshine. We sug-
gest you take one of our Genuine Old
Town Canoes and paddle up the beauti-
ful Huron River.
Saunders C anoe Livery
Phone 93 13

_.________Y

iClassified Directory
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING

FRIDAY & SATURDAY
9 A.M. to 1 AM.

OPEN DAILY
9 A. M. to 12P.M.

WE DO OUR PARt_ WE DOOURPART
A T R UST F U ND
with a reputable bank is the best method of pre-
paring for the future. Throughout the years
that we have served the people of Ann Arbor,
we have -given satisfaction to our customers.
We can heip you pleasantly and efficiently.
"The Deposits in this bank are insured by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation in the manner and to
the extent provided by the Banking Act of 19'3."
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Main at Huron 707 North University

WANTED: Two passengers to drive to
New Hampshire around June 12.
Call A. L. Wood, 5602. , 493
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 5x
WANTED: Used clothing. Best prices
paid for men's clothes and shoes.
Phone 3317. I Friedman. 468
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black key case, seven keys, be-
tween Thompson St. and Majestic
or in theatre. Tuesday morning. Call
2-3281. 492
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Furnished cottage on
island near Sault Ste. Marie. Kit-
chen, sitting-room, 3 bedrooms,
bathroom, garage. Electric lights,
telephone. Consult H. Scranton,
phone 8344. 500
THE MONROE , at 522 Monroe ( -
block west of Law Quadrangle) of-
fers 2 two-room furnished apart-
merits. Electric refrigeration, pri-
yate bath, soft water, hot water;
storage lockers. Mrs. Ferguson.
Phone 2-2839. 496
FOIE RENT: 928 Forrest. Pleasant
airy rooms for Summer School.
Phone 2-1767. 495
FOR RENT: 721 Church. Apartment
for 3 students or married couple.
Electric refrigeration, private bath,
porch. Everything furnished. Ga-
rage. 494,
SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS.
Room and board at the Lambda Chi
Alpha house for $1.00 daily. Phone
7142. 493

- -
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
For sheer nonsense, we present direct from
English 2 examination at the University of In-
diana a list of suggested titles for themes.
These titles are supposed to inspire freshmen
to great impromptu essays. We don't know how
they will affect you, but if they are read
slowly, giving the imagination free play, they
should at least provide a few chuckles.

R-eligi'ous Actiites

iversity officials should be complimented on
way they have handled the various projects
Care was taken to choose students to do tasks
hich they were particularly fitted. These stu-
benefitted not only from the financial aid re-
d, but from doing work they enjoyed and from
lose faculty associations 'they made.
culty men doing research work say that with-
he FERA students helping them, they could
nave gone nearly so far in such lines of en;
ar as they did. Those assisting in the State-
planning project have amply repaid their
nment. If the use of our resources is to be
ied in the future, much has been accomplished
could not have been done without FERA help.
ents who worked as faculty assistants also
d greatly, saving professors from bothersome
Is.
s to be hoped that national recovery will pro-
far enough so that the FERA will not be
ed in the fall. Federal agencies of this type are
ictly emergency experiments. If students are
to continue their education without govern-
subsidies so much the better. However, .it is
probable, that further aid will still be neces-
when school convenes again in September. If
tie reinstitution of the FERA in universities
olleges would be most beneficial.
e Federal Emergency Relief Administration
ique in that it is almost the only one of the
r governmental relief agencies that directly
ies education. Surely economic conditions in
h students are not able to attend college con-
e an emergency worthy of relief. The founda-
for true national recovery can begin+ in -no
r place than in higher educational institu-

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

College Life versus Education.
Liberty - Where Art Thou?
What Eccentric Men, These Professors!'
Who's Who in My Family And Why,
Without Benefit of Rhetoric.
Safety Valves in University Life.
On Being a Sophomore; A Prophecy.
* * * T
MEN ONLY READ THIS

NO MORE AMERICAN ARMS
IN THE CHACO
If any more American-made munitions are sold
in this country to Bolivia or Paraguay for use in
their war over Gran Chaco, it will be in violation
of a law of the United States, and the offender will
be subject to imprisonment for two years arfd a
fine of $10,000. Thanks to the order of President
Roosevelt, in accordance with the authority grant-
ed him by Congress, that bloodiest of traffics is
now outlawed in so far as it affects the United
States and these two South American states.
To appreciate the historical importance of this
humane step, one has only to recall how difficult it
has been in the past to get even a hearing for such
proposals. The armaments lobby has wielded its
powerful influence and, with specialists in interna-
tional law divided as to the propriety of an arms
embargo, workers for peace have hitherto known
only delay and defeat. Indeed, in the present case,
it was held by administration advisers that an out-
right embargo on munitions would run counter to
treaties providing unmolested movement of ex-
ports by the United States and the countries at
war. Thus, the ban was so phrased as to prohibit
sales in this country.
No one needs to be told that the stand of the
United States has its weaknesses. But whatever the

puTq aq ITAT omIt iJao
aCII -slTV peal 11m 866, ',uauamo 0009 JO nO
Caption under a picture of an American foot-
ball game in a German newspaper:
"A rough fight scene from the American foot-
ball, which makes understandable the high acci-
dent rate in this sport. The captain of the unbeaten
team of Oregon has jumped on the shoulders of
fellow players to catch a long distance shot from
the opposing team. Football differs from the Ger-
man "Fussball" not only by its rules, but especially
by its wild methods.
The Intercollegiate Chatter names the following
as favorite sayings of the last 44 years:
1890 - Oh, I don't know!
1900 - You're the candy kid.
1910-Who let you loose?
1915-Go jump into the lake.
1920 - Good night, nurse.
1925 - So's your old man.
1930 - Oh yeh! - Prosperity's just
around the corner.
1933-34 - How'm I doin'? - Come up

First Methodist
Episcopal Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship.
Sermon subject,
"SEEING THE
INVISIBLE GOD"
sermon by
DR. FISHER
STALKER HALL
For University Students
6:00 P.M.-- An open discussion on the
subajcct, "Does Our Education Ed-
ucate for a New Social Order?"
led by Bob McCullough.

YOUR CHURCH
DIRECTORY
for your
CONVENIENCE

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A.M. - Bible School- Topic:
"Jesus Responds to Faith"
9:00 A.M. -- Service in the German
language.
10:30 A.M.-- Sermon:
"GETTING INTO THE
KINGDOM'"

---4. .,.. ..

St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
9:30 A.M. - Sunday School and
Bible Class.

DO NOT
N EGLECT
YOUR,

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets

ii

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