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May 31, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY ATAT 31,

THE MCHIGA DAIL THURDAI.IAYP31

Pond Charges
Ship Damaged
Before Leaving
LONDON, May 30. - (A-) - Capt.
George A. Pond charged today that
the airplane in which he and Lieut.
Cesare Sabelli recently flew the At-
lantic had been maliciously tam-
pered with before they left New York.
Claiming that he had definite proof,
Pond traced trouble the flyers en-
countered to the alleged sabotage be-
fore the takeoff. He said he would at-
tempt to fasten the guilt on someone
when he returns to New York.
"We have evidence of three types
of tampering," Pond said. "There
were strips of cardboard in the oil
tank and a tin 'fillercap' in the oil
line. The main feed line from the
rear of the gas tank was definitely
shut off and the water canteens,I
one of which I filled myself, were
emptied.
"Fortunately foreign articles in the
oil tank line did not prevent oil from
getting through, though they may
have restricted the flow somewhat.
Tampering with a gas tank is most
serious and could not possibly have
happened accidentally."

Hand Lettering Of Diplomas Is
Student's Means Of Employment

By JOHN J. FLAHERTY
While seniors are hard at work
preparing for the last hurdle before
receiving diplomas, there is one man
working just as hard preparing the
diplomas for them.
In the basement of University Hall
a man sits at a desk from early in
the moiing until late at night pains-
takingly lettering names and degrees
in beautiful old English script on
square pieces of sheepskin.
This man is Dwight Gadberry, il-
luminator and letterer of manu-
scripts.
A few years ago when the Uni-
versity was not as large and lettering
was an art studied by engineers, it
was no problem at all to prepare di-
plomas, most of the work being done
by students. However, when the
number of graduates increased to ap-
proximately 2,000 and lettering be-
came more or less of a lost art a
problem was created that finally had
to be solved in a mechanical manner.
This was not a satisfactory method
in that the quality of work was in-
ferior to that done by hand, and the
diplomas lost a certain personal
touch which they had formerly pos-
sessed.

This year the diplomas will once
more be lettered by hand and the
personal touch will be that of Gad-
berry, who is using this unique meth-
od to work his way through school.
Before coming to the University he
worked as a letterer and an illustra-
tor in New York City and has sam-
ples of manuscripts that he has il-
luminated that are not unlike me-
dieval monastic work. And as he
sits bending over a desk in a cell-
like room at the end of a twisting
corridor in University Hall basement
the analogy of the monk is eren
closer.
There are drawbacks to the job,
Gadberry says. For instance he has
not been able to enjoy a spring for
six years, for it is in spring that there
is the greatest demand for hand let-
tering, and the lettering, he says, is
not the, easiest job in the world on
the eyes.

TollFrom Memorial
Day Fires Is High
CHICAGO, May 30.-(P)-The tra-
ditional verdancy of Memorial Day
woodlands dried *to tinder by a long
drought was marked by a series of
forest fires and the drabness of with-
ered grain crops throughout the coun-
try.
Scattered fires burned over Minne-
sota and Idaho. A huge marsh in
parching sun, and whole fields of
growing grains curled in the heat
which ranged from 90 degrees to a
searing 108.
One of the fires swept more than
10,000 acres of valuable timber lands
near Saranac lake in New York with
flames on a 10-mile front menacing
two villages.
Wheat soared to more than a dollar
a bushel in Minneapolis.

Death Of Naval
Hero Mourned
By AllJapan
TOKIO, May 30. --(/P)-- Admiral
Marquis Heihachiro Togo, "the Nelson
of Japan," whose humble home in
Tokio became a national shrine, died
today.
Death came to the valiant old war-
rior at the age of 86 after a slow but
losing fight against cancer of the
throat.
Admiral Togo was the last of the
heroes of the Russo-Japanese war. It
was he, standing on the deck of his
flagship, who directed the fleet to a
decisive victory over the czar's navy
and from that triumph Japan emerged
'as a world power.

_ .

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