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May 25, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIY

FRIDAY, l

VAY 25,

THE MICHIGAN DAJLY FRIDAY, lAY 25,

Dublin-Rome
Flight Halted
In British Isles
Engine Trouble Develops
In Monoplane Half-Way
Across Channel
PORT TALIBOT, Wales, May 24.-
(0)-A-Capt. George Pond and Lieut.
Cesare Sabelli, en route from Dublin
to Rome, made a forced landing at
Aberavon beach near here today.
Pond, who was at the controls of
their great orange monoplane, said
engine trouble developed as they
were crossing Bristol channel and he
decided to make a quick landing.
The plane landed gently on the sands.
The beach is. 155 miles south east
of Dublin. The landing was made
at 9:20 a.m. (4:20 a.m.; Ann Arbor
time.) The airmen hopped from Bal-
donnl Airport, Dublin, at 6:33 a.m.
local time.
Pond said it would be necessary
to send for spare parts. He ex-
pressed fear they would be held up
several more days in their oftdelayed
attenigpttocomplete the New York-
to-Rome flight started Monday, May
14.
Coast guards first sighted the plane
winging low across the bay. It cir-
cled over the dunes and then flew in
an easterly direction, but afterward
doubled back and landed safely on
the sdnd.
Sabelli, who was pale and ap-
peared somewhat agitated, was still
in the cockpit when the Associated
Press correspondent arrived at the
scene.
"All went well," the former Italian
air ace said, "until we were half way
across the channel.
"Then engine trouble similar to
that which forced us to land on the
west coast of Ireland developed again."
Fortunately the weather was in our
favor and when we saw the Welsh-
mountains we began to look for a
landing place."
The fuel line on the plane was
broken a few minutes before they
found a landing place near Iahinch
and the under-carriage was dam-
aged badly when the craft ran into
a sand bank. -

First Section Of Norris Darn Project Nears Completion

'wuTdent ilu BLIN1D; MAN'S-BLUFF through the course would be required
President W ill TOPEKA, Kan., May 24. - W) - to take a final examination. With-
The bluffers called a bluff -or was out mentioning names, he suggested
Review Fl e e t it a bluff?- at Washburn College. that the bluffers call at his ofce at-
Prof. T. L. Collier announced to his ter class.

At New York
Roosevelt To Be Saluted
By 90 Battleships During
Demonstration
WASHINGTON, May 24.--(P) -
When Prsident Roosevelt reviews the
fleet at New York on May 31, the
demonstration of the nation's "first
line of defense" is expected to be one
of the most spectacular since Presi-
dent Theodore Roosevelt sent 16 bat-
tleships around the world 27 years
ago.
Coming from war games in the
Caribbean, the long column of 90
ships will steam in from' the Atlantic
past Ambrose lightship into New York
harbor with guns roaring the presi-
dential salute, battle flags flying at
the mastheads and crews in full dress
manning the rails.
Naval officials report that the 26,-
000 men of the fleet, "every man Jiack
of them," are on their toes to make
a good showing when they pass in
review and salute the commander-
in-chief. Naval planes in snappy
formation will soar far above New
York's skyscrapers, dip down and
lay smoke screens, like billowy balls
of cotton, about the gray warships.
Added interest is attached to this
mustering of the sea power because
of the government's recent moves
to, bring the navy up to London
treaty strength and because of t4e
President's forthcoming cruise to Ha-
waii, crossroads of a Pacific ruffledl
by developments in the orient.'

educational psychology class that all A Jong line formed at the profes-
who had been bluffing their 'way sor's office door.
*.smarl ... seruiceable...
) S.popularon the continent ...
adopted bq the smart set.. ,
$.Meta
scruws
Sturdilhjconstructed, with mirrorhdle
when.
jinish aluminum and wood stick.cane ,s
"" TT in colors of black, mahogang k
blue, green, red, tan.
IOU LL WAUT ONE FOR
*Race Meets *Beaches
*rolJ matches e kTrackmeets
*Ball Camas *Polo Matches
eltegattas .Runt Meets
f% . Hikinq *Parades
*Tennismatches Foot BallQames
Shows
metal disc
quicklii
attached
for hldinq
a. f ^ 1cane in'
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when seat
is used.
- .; ft
------

-Associated Press Photo
This picture shows the progress being made on Norris dam, 25 miles northeast of Knoxville, Tenn.,
Excavation work in the first coffer dam, plainly visible, is nearly finished. Preparations now are being made
to pour the concrete which will be carried to its proper place by dunp-buckets attached to cable-way pulleys
shown in the foreground. The dam, on Clinch river, will create a reservoir 80 square miles in area.

Vangiard's To Be
Led By Weismian
Jacob Weisman, '35, was elected to
head the Vanguard Club, student lib-
eral organization, when it resumes
activity in September. The other
officers will be: Vice-president, Edith
Maples, '35; Secretary, Dorothy Gold-
smith, '35; and Karl Cannon, '35,
Treasurer.
An executive committee, composed
of I Davis Hobbs, '35g, and Kendall
Wood, '34, was also chosen at the
final meeting held Thursday night.
SCRATCHES GLASS
HALIFAX, May 28. - (/P) -The
"phantom glass-cutter is at it again.
- Two weeks ago he scratched many
down-town windows, ceasing his ac-
tivities when police began to watch
for him,
But now he has resumed his work
with a diamond or glass-cutter and
has marred forty store windows in the
shopping district, causing damage
estimated at more than $3,000.-

Believ ItOr Not,
Air. Riple ly, Snke
Has Snake Diner
Definite proof of the 'opular claim
that a blue racer snake is capable
of killing and swallowing a rattle-
snake was furnished a few days ago
when a member of the herpetology
department of the University Mu-
seums was called to witness such a
battle.
The blue racer had swallowed ap-
proximately three-quarters of the
rattlesnake and would probably have
finished his job had note his life been
cut short with a bullet fired by a wit-
ness who realized the value of the
evidence at his disposal. The bat-
tle progressed much along the lines
of the ordinaryblacksnake-rattle-
snake type until the blue racer caught
hold of the head of the rattler and
proceeded to swallow him.
As far as could be determined, the
actual swallowing was done in order
to kill rather than to appease the
I appetite. Nevertheless, after the
death of the rattlesnake, the blue
racer continued to consume his op-
ponent.
The two, preserved for posterity,
present a strange picture in that they
seem to be almost one rather than
separate. ' As the snakes were of ap-
proximately the same size, it was only
through the strange action of snake
jaws that the act was accomplished.

Consider Early
Discuission Of
Naval Affairs
WASHINGTON, May 24.-()') -
Preliminary diplomatic explorations
into the feasibility of discussing na-
val affairs prior to the 1935 Naval
Conference are under consideration
by the United States, Great Britain,
and Japan.
The explorations have not pro-
gressed to a point yet, however, where
any official statement concerning the
proposed preliminary conference or
discussions, with especial reference
to Pacific naval questions, can be
made by American officials.
It was disclosed that the United
States did not take the initiative but
that the first cautious overtures were
instituted by Great Britain or Japan.
Japan previously had made cau-
tious attempts to discern the atti-
tude of the United States and Great
Britain toward the preliminary dis-
cussions. Hiroshi Saito, the Japa-
nese ambassador, has not announced,
however, that he had made any such
overtures to the State department.
GRADUATE GETS APPOINTMENT
George L. Kolomanlehotsky, who
received his doctor's degree at the
end of last semester as a graduate
student in forestry, was selected as
assistant foresterj on. the oil ero-
ion work under the control of the
Soil Erosion Service at La Crosse,
Wisconsin. Dr. Kolomanlehotsky left
Saturday for this station.

I

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MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING
Next to the Wuerth Theatre, 322-324 South Main

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MICHIGANEN-SI1A'NS
A limited number of the
1934 'ENSI'AN
Each
UNIVERSITY
WAHR'S BOOKSTORE

(.'

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For Good Health and. Good Water
Drink Arbor Springs Water
-ORDER A CASE TODAY-
Delivered to your home in case lots of six 2-quart bottles
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

I Recreation Group

316 STATE STREET

uPe
MILK-ICE CREAM

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Plans For Summer
The Ann Arbor Vacation Recrea-
tional Association, which for the last
two summers has provided an educa-
tional and recreational program for
the children of Ann Arbor, has called
together the heads of the city's lead-
ing clubs and organizations to advise
on a similar plan for this summer.
The executive committee of the as-
sociation has held one meeting al-
ready, and formulated certain plans
for an enlarged program of summer
activities. A conference of the ad-
visers and the executive committee
has been planned for Tuesday, May
29, at the Union, in order to set
these plans before the advisers.
The committee is headed by Dean
J. B. Edmonson of the School of Ed-
ucation, and one of its leading mem-
bers is Prof. Raleigh Schorling,"also
of the School of Education.

IL

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VANILLA GRAPE - PINEAPPLE
Superior Da.i'y Company
Phone 23181

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MICHAELS STERN
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Alterations at Cost
TOPCOATS
Choice of the House
White and Pastel
HOSE
4 pai r $1.00
35c and 50c Values
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SHIRTS & SHORTS
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Sanforized SLACKS
1000 Pairs to choose from.
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STRAW HATS
$1.25 to $4.50
FLANNEL SLACKS
White, Grey and Tan
$4.50 to $6.95
Sport Coats $11.75
Sanforized SHIRTS
$1.65 value, 3 for $4

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wool worsted.
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